Solved Which CPU (codename) will replace i7-2600K?

Micro-star international / Ms-6714
June 15, 2011 at 04:02:27
Specs: Windows XP, 2.4 GHz / 1527 MB
If I was planning my desktop build for next year and wanted to buy a CPU in the same price category and similar to the Sandy Bridge i7-2600K, which CPU would I be looking at?

Nothing helps man to overcome troubles and to survive like the knowledge of a task to complete.


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#1
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#2
June 15, 2011 at 06:57:10
Hi, Cloudcentric.

Thanks for the links.

Quoting from Wikipedia:
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_...)
“Ivy Bridge, the codename for the 22 nm die shrink of Sandy Bridge, ...”
“Ivy Bridge processors will be backward compatible with the Sandy Bridge platform.”

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_... , Ivy Bridge should be released 2012.

So, being new to the computer world, I am wondering if, say I was planning to build a computer Q2 next year, 2012, it would be better to wait for Ivy Bridge, than to buy the i7-2600K now?

Nothing helps man to overcome troubles and to survive like the knowledge of a task to complete.


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#3
June 15, 2011 at 09:00:02
I think top ivy brigde cpu will perform similar to i7 2600k e.g i7 965 and i7 2600k.

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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Related Solutions

#4
June 15, 2011 at 09:15:20
Hi kuwese.
Thanks for your reply.

“I think top ivy brigde cpu will perform similar to i7 2600k e.g i7 965 and i7 2600k.”

It should fall in the same price category than the i7-2600K then?

Nothing helps man to overcome troubles and to survive like the knowledge of a task to complete.


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#5
June 15, 2011 at 11:00:21
kuwese, or anybody,

My case is as follows:

I want a motherboard with the required PCI-e lanes to accommodate more than a 16 x PCI-e nVidia card with CUDA support to enable hardware MPE acceleration (so that when I add a hardware controller from Areca the video card does not drop from x16 to x8), but with the present P67 and Z68 platform there is already a slight performance degradation when adding a hardware controller. The first X79 boards that were on show at Computex this month also don't have the required PCI-e lanes.

To the system that I want to build, I want to add an Areca hardware controller, but the latter is expensive, so I cannot see that happening soon. Areca does not expect the new generation of PCIe-3 boards before Q1/2012 anyway.

The $1000 Sandy Bridge E, to be released soon, also seems out of reach for me financially for a while. Eventually I want to upgrade to Sandy Bridge E (or maybe there will be an Ivy Bridge successor to the Sandy Bridge E), but at this stage it looks like I may have to settle for a CPU in the price category of the i7-2600K at first, and then upgrade to the Sandy Bridge E or similar at a later stage.

So I am concerned that if I buy the i7-2600K now, with socket 1155, with no board yet available to fit my PCI-e requirements, my upgrade plans may be limited for what may come next year - Adobe Premiere Pro does not yet utilize full bandwidth, but if Adobe releases CS6 and things change with new drivers, who knows what will happen.

If I was planning to build my editing system Q2 next year, 2012, would it be better in my case to wait for Ivy Bridge and its new platform (socket 2011), than to buy the i7-2600K with socket 1155?

Nothing helps man to overcome troubles and to survive like the knowledge of a task to complete.


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#6
June 15, 2011 at 16:32:24
From what I have read the new Ivy Bridge CPU's will run on the 1155 socket BUT will need a new chipset than the ones currently available for the Sandy Bridge CPU's. Backwards compatibility will come in the form that the new chipsets will also operate the Sandy Bridge CPU's as far as I can tell from the bits and pieces that are out there. With the E-series arriving this year I think the Ivy bridge will probably be introduced first in the mid to upper mid range first with the lower range staying with the Sandy's for now and the Sandy-E's being in the upper range, but what AMD does in the mean time will probably effect this prediction depending on the popularity and effectiveness of their new line. Most of this is pure speculation, I do not have any tie into the grape vine on this anymore than anyone else here (possibly less, but those who know are being very quiet). I think that anyone who is getting any real information has been threatened with not receiving their free advanced unlocked test chips to play with.
As far as the PCIe 16x's, the Z68 chipset appears to have the extra independent lane you appear to need, Look at these motherboards:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
They are listing PCIe specs like 16x,8x and 16x,8x,4x and even 2 at 16x or 4 at 8x
I remember reading that the 'Z' series chipset at least (not sure about the P or H series though) for the Ivy's will loose support of PCI and go completely with PCIe slots.
The new 3D architecture should give major a improvement to the speed of processing eventually, but I have not heard whether this will need a major rewritting of software to take full advantage of it. An example of this is getting 6, 8 or more cores when most software can use only 2 or possibly 4 cores so the advantage is mainly in running multiple applications.

I am interested in others opinions of my synopsis and especially any hard facts they may be able to share.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
June 15, 2011 at 19:54:46
It should fall in the same price category than the i7-2600K then?
The first genearation of core i7 processors are still expensive but they suprised me with their second generation of core i7(i didn't expect the new chips will be that cheap). I hope they continue to drop down price.

Areca hardware controller
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
Looks like u don't need expensive board to run areca controller card. U need a board with PCIe x16 and x1 slots.

If I was planning to build my editing system Q2 next year, 2012, would it be better in my case to wait for Ivy Bridge and its new platform (socket 2011), than to buy the i7-2600K with socket 1155?
With ivy bridge don't expect bigger performance increase over current sandy bridge. Why do u think u need high end hardware to perform heavy tasks?

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#8
June 16, 2011 at 02:26:29
Fingers,

Thanks for pointing out the extra independent lane I appear to need and the link to Z68 boards.

"... so the advantage is mainly in running multiple applications."

Agree. Running multiple applications with Adobe CS5 demands much from a system. The Premier Pro Benchmark Results show the number of cores editors have for their editing rigs.
http://ppbm5.com/Benchmark5.html
from
http://ppbm5.com/Benchmark5.html

“Backwards compatibility will come in the form that the new chipsets will also operate the Sandy Bridge CPU's as far as I can tell from the bits and pieces that are out there.”

That's interesting, I wish I knew this for certain.


Thanks for sharing your synopsis, it helps. Looking forward to any hard facts.

Nothing helps man to overcome troubles and to survive like the knowledge of a task to complete.


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#9
June 16, 2011 at 09:33:41
kuwese,

Thanks for your reply.

"The first genearation of core i7 processors are still expensive but they suprised me with their second generation of core i7(i didn't expect the new chips will be that cheap). I hope they continue to drop down price."

Yes, especially considering that the much cheaper four core Core i7-2600K, which theoretically doesn’t belong to the top product category, at third the price of the most expensive processor in the market, the 1000-dollar six-core Core i7-990X Extreme Edition, managed to outperform many pricier products for a higher-end LGA1366 platform”, and is “just as good as the six-core Core i7-990X Extreme Edition “in terms of performance in the majority of popular applications” and “can boast much higher relative performance per core”.

Page 13 of “Core i7-990X Extreme Edition vs. Core i7-2600K.”
http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/cp... l#sect0
Core i7-990X Extreme Edition vs. Core i7-2600K.
http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/cp...

Supposing that it is so that the “new chipsets will also operate the Sandy Bridge CPU's” (quoting from post#6 above), and that they wont have “bigger performance increase over current sandy bridge” (quoting from post#7 above), who would want to buy Ivy Bridge if their price was higher or even the same than Sandy Bridge?

“Looks like u don't need expensive board to run areca controller card. U need a board with PCIe x16 and x1 slots.”

Thanks for the link.
I may need something like an Areca ARC-1880ix-16 PCI-Express 2.0 x8 SATA / SAS later along the line,
http://www.ipcdirect.net/servlet/De...,
but since Areca does not expect the new generation of PCIe-3 boards before Q1/2012 anyway, I will wait to see what boards follow those that were on show at Computex this month.
http://www.techpowerup.com/146582/G...
http://motherboardnews.com/2011/05/...
http://www.anandtech.com/Gallery/Al...

“With ivy bridge don't expect bigger performance increase over current sandy bridge. Why do u think u need high end hardware to perform heavy tasks?”

I am not so much after “a bigger performance increase over current sandy bridge” (although according to Wikipedia “Intel is targeting a 30 percent graphics performance and 20 percent CPU performance boost compared to Sandy Bridge” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_...),
because the Sandy Bridge i7-2600K, though it theoretically doesn’t belong to the top product category, managed to outperform many pricier products in editing rigs, (http://ppbm5.com/Benchmark5.html),
but what interests me is that the new performance line will support PCI Express 3.0 and, from what I read, will have double the PCI lanes (and double the memory channels and double the L3 cache).

Nothing helps man to overcome troubles and to survive like the knowledge of a task to complete.


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#10
June 17, 2011 at 20:38:36
a 22nm fab process thats like each transistor the size of an atom.it cant go any smaller than that.so its either bigger processors or just sitck with the ivy bridge for a looooong looooong time

Intel Core 2 Duo E2180 @ 2.00 GHz

2 GB DDR2 DAM

XFX Radeon HD 4650

250 GB HDD


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#11
June 22, 2011 at 05:22:17
masterofnocrack,

Referring to your post #10 above,
“a 22nm fab process thats like each transistor the size of an atom.it cant go any smaller than that.so its either bigger processors or just sitck with the ivy bridge for a looooong looooong time”.

According to the semiconductor manufacturing processes 22 nm will be followed by 16 nm, which will be followed by 11 nm, which will be followed by 6 nm, which will be followed by 4 nm.
See:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4_nano...

According to YONHAP NEWS, 31 May 2011, yesterday 3 weeks ago, a transistor that's 2 nm in size was created, which happens to be the smallest in the world to date.
See:
http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/bus...
and
http://gizmodo.com/5807151/2+nanome...

So, masterofnocrack, it is NOT “either bigger processors or just sitck with the ivy bridge for a looooong looooong time”.

Nothing helps man to overcome troubles and to survive like the knowledge of a task to complete.


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#12
June 25, 2011 at 10:17:53
Excuse me if I am missing the point??

The Areca controller you are looking at is a PCI-e SATA controller yeah? It can do Raid 1 & 0 through JBOD controller. It only has 2 SATA ports.

The link in post #6 has mobos listed a newegg. If you look at the GIGABYTE GA-Z68XP-UD3-iSSD it has 4 of the new 6Gb/s sata controllers, 2 of which will support RAID 0 & 2. IT also has another 4 SATAII controllers that will do Raid 1,5 and 10.

Why do you need a sata controller? I understand the performance and large storage requirements for Adobe CS5 but surely the built in RAID 1 controllers and you possibly looking at getting SSD's later would be a better implementation for your performance requirements?

Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3P
Intel Core 2 Duo E6420
2x1Gb Corsair XMS2 DDR2-800Mhz
Sapphire x1950Pro
500GB Cavier Blue
500W FSP Bluestorm PSU


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#13
June 25, 2011 at 20:01:45
....And if the SATA/Raid controller is already built in to the board, then the BIOS already supports it and the drivers are already included with the MB drivers. Compatibility 100% guarantied by the MB mfg.
That sounds better to me, just purchase a motherboard with all of the features you need and minimize the add ons and possible compatibility issues.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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