What are the dangers of overclocking?

Self build / HOME MADE
January 4, 2011 at 22:12:40
Specs: Windows 7, Phanom 2 x 4 3.4 ghz
I would like to know the dangers of overclocking if your CPU is not over heating? The temps of my Phanom 2 3.4 ghz processor are amazing. I had this processor overclocked at 3.8 ghz and the temps were between 27-35 C degrees. I use that huge round copper Zalman for the processor cooler. Anyway I choose the past tense words had and were because I got spooked and backed the timing down to about 3.6 ghz. I am an experienced computer repair person with many years at computer repair and use. However, I am totally new at overclocking and have always been told that over heating and frying your processor was always the chance you took when overclocking and the very reasons I stayed away from this till a friend sorta changed my mind. So my question is, if your processor is not getting hot then what are the other chances are you taking?

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#1
January 5, 2011 at 00:49:14
Overclocking cpu isn't dangerous(if u do it right), over volting cpu is dangerous(it can fry cpu or reduce cpu lifespan). I believe u have phenom II X4 965 BE for eg. The safe voltage range for your x4 965 is 0.850 - 1.425v if u increase it to 1.5v that is overvolting.
The cpu temp is fine so why 3.6ghz(instead 3.8ghz)?

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#2
January 5, 2011 at 05:01:13
Modern CPUs all have thermal protection circuitry so it's virtually impossible to overheat one to death. Overvolting is a completely different issue. A CPU can fry if the voltage is raised too high.

Assuming you have a Black Edition CPU, all you need to do to overclock is increase the multiplier & possibly the voltage. If you have a standard CPU, the multiplier is locked from being raised, but it can be lowered. Overclocking a standard CPU is more difficult because you have to deal with numerous other settings - CPU reference clock, CPU multiplier, CPU voltage, RAM settings, HT bus, PCI/PCIe bus, Spread Spectrum, etc.


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#3
January 5, 2011 at 06:43:54
I have no desire to increase the CPU voltage as it seems to be stable enough by increasing the multiplier alone. For me going from 3.4 to 3.8 is a very big jump and I have no desire to go any higher. I do not believe in tempting fate. I do have the black edition Phenom 2, to answer someones question. So from what I am understanding then I can do this with little to no harm to my motherboard and CPU. If that is the case then I will crank it back up to 3,8 ghz. Thanks for your answers so far.

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#4
January 5, 2011 at 06:50:09
Overclocking is operating the CPU outside the parameters established by the manufacturer. Even when temperatures are normal there is no guarantee the processor will be able to operate reliably when overclocked. If the CPU makes a mistake this could mean an application or system crash. Some processors have a greater tolerance for this than others. There is no way of knowing what the tolerance will be without testing.

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#5
January 5, 2011 at 09:45:16
"For me going from 3.4 to 3.8 is a very big jump and I have no desire to go any higher. I do not believe in tempting fate"

You are not tempting fate. Black Edition CPUs are offered as a "gift" to overclockers/enthusiasts. Here's was what AMD says about it's Black Edition CPUs - "designed to help you unleash the maximum potential of your system with tunable performance that delivers enthusiast-grade megatasking and phenomenal features at the right price."

http://game.amd.com/gb-uk/unlock_ph...

A 400MHz increase to a 3.4GHz CPU is roughly a 12% overclock. That's not bad, but it can certainly go higher. And if you leave Cool 'n' Quiet enabled along with the CPU's built-in thermal protection, you'll have very little to worry about in terms of "tempting fate".

I've been overclocking CPUs since the socket 7 days when I clocked my Pentium 166MMX up to 233MHz. And I've overclocked every single system I've owned since then. I have NEVER fried a CPU due to overclocking. Some folks claim the overclocking reduces the lifespan on the CPU, but realistically, how long is a CPU expected to be in service before it's considered outdated? 5 yrs?


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#6
January 5, 2011 at 21:04:22
Thanks for your reply and your experience with overclocking. I have decided to stick with the 400MHZ increase and leave it at that. The reason for the change of heart in overclocking is I buy those Que computer books and even that writer has changed his mind about overclocking. He expresses to use caution but he does not totally advise against it like he use too several volumes ago. So I am going to take a moderate plunge and see what happens. Thanks for all your answers.

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#7
January 8, 2011 at 01:16:45
Thank you for all your help. I got the information I needed.

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