Solved well a 5oo watt power supply work good to game on!?

November 29, 2013 at 17:47:36
Specs: Windows 7, 8gb
i have a AMD FX-4130 Zambezi 3.8GHz, with a MSI 970A-G43 AM3+ mobo, and G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB, and a 5oo watt cool max power supply, ow and a hd 777o sapphire graphic card for it. i was just wanting to verify that this power supply will be sufficient for my gaming and over clocking needs thanks!

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✔ Best Answer
December 1, 2013 at 20:50:34
riider is saying to save the money on the aftermarket cooler and thermal paste and spend it on a good power supply. IF you have a heating problem that you cannot solve otherwise and the money is available, you can always add the more expensive heat sink, but your build or upgrade should focus on the most important components for now and there is nothing more important than a good power supply. Especially on a gaming machine.

According to the test riider linked to, that power supply should be rated as a 250Watt model, and should never be used on a modern system, being of a very cheap and very old design. If you try using it, you will be risking many of your components and if you carefully read the article, you will see that when higher currents were drawn (at least as far as it could go), it often could not keep the voltage stable and 'clean' enough for computer use.

In summary, hold your build until you can get a proper power supply and if you can get your money back on that one, do it immediately!

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
November 29, 2013 at 17:52:27
ow and i was also wondering what would be the cheapest and best cpu fan to go over my processor?

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#2
November 30, 2013 at 05:56:46
500W doesn't tell us anything. CoolMax isn't a top quality brand & you didn't list the model number or the specs. And the cheapest CPU cooler is the stock AMD cooler.

"G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB"

Is it DDR3-1866? It should be....

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Bulld...

message edited by riider


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#3
November 30, 2013 at 11:50:31
1 x G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL8D-8GBXM

1 x AMD FX-4130 Zambezi 3.8GHz Socket AM3+ Quad-Core Desktop Processor FD4130FRGUBOX

1 x MSI 970A-G43 AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard

1 x COOLMAX V-500 500W ATX Power Supply

1tb 7200 rpm hard drive 16 mb cache

sapphire hd 7770

can i have some tips on installing the proceessor along side with updating the bios so i can properly over clock


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Related Solutions

#4
November 30, 2013 at 14:38:25
The V-500 is a low end cheapie. It's based on an older design with multiple +12v rails, it's not 80 Plus efficient, it has no PFC (power factor correction), & doesn't have enough connectors (only 2 SATA plus it's lacking a 6-pin PCIe plug for video cards). I wouldn't risk it, especially since you plan on overclocking.

Here's a couple of snippets from the following review article:

"The Coolmax V-500 is a textboook example of why you should not buy a USD 20 power supply."

"A perfect weapon of mass destruction. Stay away."

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/arti...


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#5
November 30, 2013 at 15:27:26
well since im low on cash could i still use it just for gaming? i like to play games on ultra so would that ok without the overclock of any component

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#6
November 30, 2013 at 15:29:33
should i use the stock thermal paste for the processor or would it be better to use Arctic Silver CMQ2-2.7G Céramique 2 Tri-Linear Ceramic Thermal Compound - OEM instead of the orginal?

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#7
November 30, 2013 at 15:43:48
Save the money on the expensive thermal compound and purchase a GOOD power supply like this one:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
Though this one is a good buy also:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
November 30, 2013 at 15:59:04
well the thermal compound is already paid for, i was wondering if it would be safe to use this power supply (cool max) and the the thermal compound for now till i get the money i just want to play some games until then, and dont want anything to be ruined in my computer you know! thanks again!

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#9
November 30, 2013 at 16:00:57
Rather than wasting your money on an aftermarket cooler & Arctic Silver, just use the stock AMD cooler & paste & invest in a decent PSU. Fingers linked you to 2 excellent deals. If you try using the Coolmax & it fails, it could possible fry the board or CPU, then you'll be out several 100 dollars. Besides, the V-500 doesn't even have the 6-pin PCIe connector required for your video card.

"i like to play games on ultra"

I don't know if that's gonna happen with the HD 7770. It depends on your monitor size, gaming resolution, & the complexity of the game.

EDIT: if you haven't already done so, I highly suggest you go back & read that review about the V-500 & what a total piece of crap it is. Don't say you haven't been warned.

message edited by riider


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#10
November 30, 2013 at 16:10:34
well i have a cable that uses the molex power connector to a six pin for the graphic card. everything in this list is all new except for the graphic card which is out my old computer. so your saying its better to use the stock thermal past that came with my processor instead of the arctic silver?

and would crossfiring sapphire hd 7770 be better to play games on ultra im really thinking about purchasing another one


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#11
November 30, 2013 at 16:15:07
Nevermind, you're not even paying attention. Good luck.

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#12
November 30, 2013 at 16:47:22
yes i am paying attention, thanks for the help!

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#13
December 1, 2013 at 20:50:34
✔ Best Answer
riider is saying to save the money on the aftermarket cooler and thermal paste and spend it on a good power supply. IF you have a heating problem that you cannot solve otherwise and the money is available, you can always add the more expensive heat sink, but your build or upgrade should focus on the most important components for now and there is nothing more important than a good power supply. Especially on a gaming machine.

According to the test riider linked to, that power supply should be rated as a 250Watt model, and should never be used on a modern system, being of a very cheap and very old design. If you try using it, you will be risking many of your components and if you carefully read the article, you will see that when higher currents were drawn (at least as far as it could go), it often could not keep the voltage stable and 'clean' enough for computer use.

In summary, hold your build until you can get a proper power supply and if you can get your money back on that one, do it immediately!

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
December 1, 2013 at 22:57:31
thanks alot Fingers! i understanding on what i should do now great advise!

are kentek 600 watt psu great for what i need ?


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#15
December 2, 2013 at 06:22:55
Still not a good choice. When I look at the specs I see only 70% efficient, 40Amps on the 5volt rail and 25Amps on the 12volt rail (another site shows it as 22A on 12V), two SATA connectors, possibly a PCIe connector and a one year warranty. One site lists approvals including FCC (radio noise) and CSA (Canada) but no UL listing, so it really is not approved/intended for the US market. It is still a $20. cheap power supply. The 430Watt Corsair model I linked to has nearly twice the available 12Volt Amperage of this supposedly 600 Watt model and the inflated 5Volt and 3.3Volt amperage ratings (if real) can never be used since all of the high draw components on a modern system draw from the 12 Volt rail, not the lower voltage rails. Understand that all cheap power supply manufactures do this inflating of these numbers to show higher overall wattage ratings, but even if these ratings are real, they cannot be used by you and more often are not real. Apparently it is much easier and cheaper to offer higher amperage numbers at these voltages and when you have trouble later, they can point out that they told you that the 12 Volt amperage was not sufficient for your graphics card (never mind that a decent 430Watt unit can provide more usable amperage than their 750Watt model at a more energy efficient level and with a warranty three times as long). A good power supply has a 3 year warranty because the manufacturer has more confidence in the quality of their product and a few of their best models have even a 5 year warranty.
I repeat, DON'T GO CHEAP !!!
Spend a little bit more and save a lot more money in the long run.
If chosen carefully with a lot of looking at reviews, a $20. power supply MIGHT be able to power an inexpensive off-the-shelf computer a few years out of warranty (like the one that probably was included), but not a gaming machine. Once you add a graphics card and use the machine for more than the basics (web, email, office work), you are in a different world. Cheap is cheap. Don't do it.

Note, you did ask at one point about using two graphics cards, if you do end up going this route, you will need to get up into good high wattage power supplies that will be over $100.00, where either of those I linked would handle a really decent single graphics card which would be a better overall upgrade when the time comes.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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