Upgrading Optiplex G110

Ibm Pentium iii 1.26ghz processor
July 9, 2009 at 22:37:56
Specs: Windows XP
My friend loaned me his computer earlier
today, because I had some spare parts I'm not
using, and he wanted me to perform upgrades
on it for him. I did all the research online and
found that I have a Pentium III 1.2GHz lying
around which would fit his old Optiplex 110's
socket 370 slot.

Brought his computer back to my house,
plugged it all in, and it worked fine. I backed
up some files, turned it off again, opened off
the case, and dismantled the unique fan/heat
sink setup it had inside. I took out the old
866MHz Pentium III that was installed in it, put
in the new one, and tried to close it all back up
like a routine upgrade. Only to find that the
heatsink had to be clipped onto the processor,
and it would not fit now.

I went and retrieved a heatsink that would fit
from another computer I have and put it in, but
now that wouldn't fit into the big green plastic
case (which sort of fits over the fan and
heatsink and directs the air current.)

I tinkered with it for a while, but no luck.
Finally I decided to put it back together just
the way I found it, and work with it more in the
morning. Put the old processor and heatsink
in, plugged the fan back in, snapped the big
green plastic case on it. But the moment I
plugged the power cord in, the computer came
on. Nothing appeared on the monitor for a few
seconds and I could smell burning, so I
immediately unplugged it again.

This is my friend's only computer and while he
signed a contract agreeing that I'm not liable if
the computer is somehow damaged ... he's
going to be really pissed at me if I can't fix
this. What do I do? HELP!!!


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#1
July 10, 2009 at 01:00:43
You can upgrade that CPU! You have to remove the green thing and install a regular heatsink and fan though. In order to install a new fan you'll have to very carefully pull the black plastic shroud away from the fan header pins. Use a pliers and pull straight away from the board. Don't wiggle, bend or twist the shroud - the tiny PC traces will break. And to install the cpu you'll have to use the right kind of heat sink! You can't use just any old heatsink or the CPU will burn up.

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#2
July 10, 2009 at 01:16:35
It wasn't just any old heatsink, though; I cannibalized it and a
fan from my old computer, which used the exact same model
of P3 chip (socket 370). And still it wouldn't come on properly,
just the front light came on and I could smell it burning.

I did a bit more research and I realized that I need to apply
some kind of heat conductor gel to the chip and the heatsink.
If I go out and buy some of this gel stuff and try and upgrade
the computer again using it, do you think it will work, or is the
computer gone for good and I should just stop trying?


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#3
July 10, 2009 at 05:54:11
"I did all the research online and
found that I have a Pentium III 1.2GHz lying
around which would fit his old Optiplex 110's
socket 370 slot."

You didn't research very well. The P3 866MHz is a Coppermine/FC-PGA packaging, the P3 1.2GHz is a Tualatin/FC-PGA2 packaging. They are not interchangeable.

"While the Coppermine uses a FC-PGA packaging, the Tualatin uses the newer FC-PGA2 packaging. What does this all mean? It means that if you want to be able to use the Tualatin, you have to upgrade the motherboard as well. Users looking for a quick upgrade for their Pentium 3 Coppermine will not be able to use the Tualatin. "

http://www.tweak3d.net/reviews/inte...

"Put the old processor and heatsink
in, plugged the fan back in, snapped the big
green plastic case on it. But the moment I
plugged the power cord in.....I could smell burning, so I
immediately unplugged it again."

Did you completely remove any old thermal material & apply a fresh dab of thermal paste? Are you 100% sure you installed the HSF properly? Supposedly the P3 is thermally protected but you should probably pull the CPU & check for signs of scorching.

Another possibility is that you fried the board due to using the wrong CPU.


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#4
July 10, 2009 at 10:38:40
Apparently I didn't do all the research I should have, then. I've
tested it further and it seems like the motherboard is fried. We
have decided to give up on the upgrades and acquire /
purchase him an entirely new computer ... which we probably
should have done in the first place!

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