Solved Upgrading CPU = Reinstall Windows?

September 13, 2014 at 20:46:08
Specs: Windows 7, 2.1Ghz
Im planning to change my cpu which is an amd a6-3500 to an amd athlon 2 x4 651 because it's the fastest cpu supported by my cpu (ga a75m-ds2 rev 2.0). So if I change my cpu, do I need to reinstall Windows?

This PC will never be as fast as yours.


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✔ Best Answer
September 15, 2014 at 05:50:13
"I don't have that much knowledge on OCing"

Maybe you should look into it & gain that knowledge. It would have saved you from buying a new CPU when the one you already have is capable of the performance of the new one.

"I also have a 650W PSU and I guess that's too much"

You can never have "too much". If your system only needs 250W, that's all the PSU will produce. Problems arise when the PSU & the system needs are "too close", such as using a 300W PSU for a 250W system. In that case, the PSU is running very close to max capacity & has a higher chance of failure. A 650W would be running at less than 50% capacity so is much less likley to fail. Of course, that's assuming good quality PSUs are being used. Regardless, wattage rating is not how you should judge a PSU, you should consider ALL the specs, especially the amperage ratings, amperage distribution, whether it's a single +12v rail or multi +12v rail design, whether it has an 80 plus efficiency rating, active PFC, etc.

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#1
September 14, 2014 at 03:20:47
No. That's only necessary if you change the entire motherboard.

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#2
September 14, 2014 at 07:17:41
Have you tried overclocking the A6? Are you running an actual video card or are you using the integrated graphics? The 651 has no integrated graphics so you will have to run a video card. Also, the 651 is a 100W CPU, the A6 is only 65W, so that means it will draw an additional 3A from the +12v rail...make sure your power supply is up to it. If you plan on overclocking, get the 651K (unlocked multiplier) rather than the 651. Regardless of the CPU (including the A6), you should be running DDR3-1866 RAM.

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#3
September 15, 2014 at 00:52:40
I am running an actual video card which is a GTX 550ti. I'm not really into overclocking because I don't have that much knowledge on OCing so I guess I'll get the 651. I'm also running a 4GB DDR3-1866 RAM which I'm also planning to add another 4GB. I also have a 650W PSU and I guess that's too much.. Thanks for the replies!

And typo from my original post it was supposed to be "supported by my motherboard". Don't know why it became cpu.

This PC will never be as fast as yours.


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#4
September 15, 2014 at 05:50:13
✔ Best Answer
"I don't have that much knowledge on OCing"

Maybe you should look into it & gain that knowledge. It would have saved you from buying a new CPU when the one you already have is capable of the performance of the new one.

"I also have a 650W PSU and I guess that's too much"

You can never have "too much". If your system only needs 250W, that's all the PSU will produce. Problems arise when the PSU & the system needs are "too close", such as using a 300W PSU for a 250W system. In that case, the PSU is running very close to max capacity & has a higher chance of failure. A 650W would be running at less than 50% capacity so is much less likley to fail. Of course, that's assuming good quality PSUs are being used. Regardless, wattage rating is not how you should judge a PSU, you should consider ALL the specs, especially the amperage ratings, amperage distribution, whether it's a single +12v rail or multi +12v rail design, whether it has an 80 plus efficiency rating, active PFC, etc.

message edited by riider


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