Solved replacing a p4 procedure

July 17, 2011 at 21:08:20
Specs: Windows XP
I have a Dell dimension 8300 with a 3.0ghz P4. Purchased replacement motherboard on Ebay due to issues with USB ports and SATA drive lockups. Moving CPU / heatsync seems tricky. Wanna get it right! Could use some help on the procedure.

See More: replacing a p4 procedure

Report •

#1
July 18, 2011 at 04:41:45
✔ Best Answer
Assuming that the motherboard fits you case (no guaranty unless same model), what motherboard did you purchase?
Basically:
Warm the CPU surface by using the computer at least 30 min. (easier thermal compound release)
Shut down and unplug, open case
Unlock heat sink
GENTLY turn heatsink left and right a little while lifting it off
Leave the CPU in the socket until you are nearly ready to reinstall
You need to carefully clean the old thermal compound off the CPU and the mating surface on the heatsink without making scratches on the surfaces. Use a quality rubbing alcohol and an old credit card as a scraper to help but do this carefully. It appears you have the older 478 socket which means you have straight pins on the bottom of the CPU and you will need to make sure you do NOT bend any of them while doing this (you may want to leave the CPU in the OLD socket until the worst of the compound is removed). When the CPU is clean, inspect the bottom of the CPU to be sure the pins are straight and they are clean of compound also (straightening pins can be done but it MUST be done carefully, an empty mechanical pencil has been suggested as a good tool but be gentle).
READ THIS on applying thermal compound to the P4:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/app...
It will apply to any thermal compound you purchase. I would suggest installing the CPU as soon as it is clean so you reduce the chance of bending pins (the safest place for the CPU is in the socket). Dell MAY have used standard heat sink lock downs, if so it will fit most boards, IF they used proprietary lock downs, it may only fit one of their boards.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#2
July 18, 2011 at 05:58:45
Thanks! yes it is a near identical MOBO, Specifically, the target (new one) is a Dell G0728 Dimension 8300 Motherboard. FYI, the original was a "craigs list" machine which always had an issue with its USB ports, and intermittent (but very annoying) issues with its SATA ports. I'll seldom get through a direct SATA-SATA drive clone, even with something reliable like a bootable Acornis CD, and everything seems to point to the mobo. (References to the southbridge chipset have frequently come up in discussion). Anyway, the part I was uneasy about... definitely in the "better safe than sorry" department, was that "turning left and right a little" you suggested while lifting. Even with the locks removed, the whole heatsync is shrouded in a metal barrier on all sides, that doesn't SEEM to provide much "wiggle" room. So, before I apply so much as a pound of force, I wanted some guidance.

Hopefully this will go smoothly, and I'll end up with a more reliable and more fully functional system. Thanks again!


Report •

#3
July 18, 2011 at 06:51:59
The system is pretty outdated. Hopefully you didn't pay much for it. Did you pay more than $20 for the replacement board?

http://support.dell.com/support/edo...


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
July 18, 2011 at 07:23:44
$29.95 including shipping. Not bad I don't think, and worth the investment for a few reasons. First of all, I have an an awful lot of expensive software that works well for me, and the number of interconnections and expected behavior and interaction between my many applications is not insignificant. A new machine is going to mean a LOT of time re-installing and rebuilding all those bridges. Further, call me old fashioned, but I've always been slow to upgrade OSs. I just get tired ob being told I need a new kind of hammer with special nails everytime I need to build a new shed. So I'm still back in XP-Sr3. While Windows 7 looks tempting, a lot of my more expensive software will require upgrading,because Microsoft just refuses to maintain backward compatibility. When i go to Win-7 it will have to be in a fresh machine. In the mean time, for my XP-sr3 setup, its been my understanding that Microsoft was somehow refusing (or forbiddding) board level XP drivers for newer machines. So eve though I wouldn't mind migrating my existing XP system to more up to data hardware, its tough to know when you're looking for bargain equipment which once can be reverted to XP, and a which ones can't

Report •

#5
July 18, 2011 at 07:51:15
I was referring to the hardware, not the OS - socket 478 CPU, Intel 875P
based board, DDR1 memory, AGP, etc. You could have easily migrated your HDD into a more modern system & simply done a "repair installation" of XP.

Report •

#6
July 18, 2011 at 08:02:06
I think I'd like to do both! Then when the new machine is fully set up and stale, this one I'm repairing now can become a useful backup machine. But will there be an issue as I described? Would I have a hard time finding XP board level drivers for certain better machines?

I'll likely have some more questions for everyone when I do that, but as I'm always a bargain hunter, thats where I have to start... if I get a machine that has the hardware I want, but maybe has Vista installed, is there any reason to doubt that board level XP drivers could not be found if i attempted suc a migration? Pardon my ignorance here. This all stems from a few years back when I was looking in Best Buy for a machine. I knew they were all VISTA off the shelf, but when i asked about having them supply it with XP for me, their "geek squad" said that Microsoft wasn't allowing that, and the the board level drivers were not being made available by the mfgrs.

I realize this is a totally different subject, but what's the truth here?


Report •

#7
July 18, 2011 at 12:45:20
What he is trying to say is that you probably can find a socket 775 board that will support a core2 CPU and DDR2 with PCIe16 that is not too old but would have drivers available for XP (check the manufacturer's websites)

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

Ask Question