Solved Problem with preformance of cpu upgrade

October 15, 2013 at 10:47:06
Specs: Windows 7
Hello experts. I have a Asus P5P43TDPRO with 2x2gb Corsair 1333mhz, 9-9-9-24. I am in the process of upgrading my cpu. I'm going from a Intel E7500 2.93 core duo to a Q9505 2.83 Quad. I had the 2.93 OC'd at 3.3 with just a bump from the fsb. I can only get the 2.83 to 3.06 (8.5 x 360) without blue screening. I'm not an expert so I am asking what other adjustments to make besides adjusting the FSB. Everything is set to auto. Right now the 2.93 is preforming better with my daw so I am disappointed. If I could get a little more performance I'd be grateful. Thanks.

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#1
October 15, 2013 at 12:31:36
First see if your memory has EPP settings that will easily allow you to run them at 1600 (800freq) (good ratio). If the memory does not have the extra settings or your motherboard does not support them, you can manually overclock the memory now or after the CPU OC is stable (for better performance). You will probably need to raise the memory freq., loosen (slightly raise) the timings, and probably raise the memory voltage (1.5V to 1.65V). If they can, then you should first turn up the CPU freq. to 400 and back down on the multplier (400x7=2.8GHz; 400x7.5=3.0GHz; 400x8=3.2GHz; 400x8.5=3.4GHz, etc). Once you can run your FBS at 1600 and confirm stability on CPU and memory (400x7 & 1600) your should slowly raise the multiplier on the CPU. If you get instability, just raise the VCore a notch or two to gain back your stability while watching your temperatures.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
October 15, 2013 at 21:56:55
Hi Fingers. Thanks for ur reply. I have now changed the ratio to 7. and was able to change the mem to 1600 and FSB to 400.. There is no memory voltage readout in the bios but there is a manual setting for overvoltage .Would I just fill that with a .15 to get me to 1.65v? Also am I damaging the memory by not uping the voltage? I'm a little shaky about uping voltages as I dont want to cause damage. And the memory timing? Would I go to 8-8-8-20. Just read someone mention that at newegg in the feedback for my Cosair mem. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ... I'm surprised I even have to OC a 2.83 x4 to get me to where I was 2.93 x 2 OC @ 3.3. Thanks again for ur help.

message edited by ShawnyM


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#3
October 16, 2013 at 07:19:11
✔ Best Answer
A couple of things to know for Core 2 setups....

- the CPU:RAM frequency ratio should be either 1:1 or 1:2
- the higher the FSB, the better the performance
- try to take advantage of the motherboard's capabilities

Here's your board specs: http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P5...

Here's the E7500 specs: http://ark.intel.com/products/36503/

The E7500's default clock settings are 11 x 266MHz & it has a max safe voltage of 1.3625v. Your board is capable of at least 1600MHz FSB (400MHz). Unfortunately your RAM is only DDR3-1333 (667MHz) - if it won't overclock to 800MHz (1:2 ratio), you can underclock it to 400Mhz (1:1 ratio) to allow a better CPU overclock. The advantage of the underclocked RAM is that you'd be able to tighten up on the timings.

If it were my system, I would shoot for either 3.6GHz (9 x 400), 3.8GHz (9.5 x 400), or 4.0GHz (10 x 400) with the RAM at 400MHz with tight timings. No need to play with the RAM voltage but you would likely need to increase the CPU voltage to stabilize the overclock. As long as you keep it within the safe voltage range & the temp remains reasonable, it should be OK.

Here's the Q9505 specs: http://ark.intel.com/products/42920...

The Q9505 won't overclock as high as the E7500. It's default clock settings are 8.5 x 333MHz & also has a max safe voltage of 1.3625v. However, the lower multiplier puts it at a disadvantage. Increasing the CPU frequency from 333MHz to 400MHz will only put the clock speed at 3.4GHz therefore it won't perform as well as the OC'd E7500, except possibly on multi-threaded apps that can make full use of the additional cores.

In other words, your upgrade may actually be a downgrade.

message edited by riider


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#4
October 16, 2013 at 08:12:19
Hi Rider, Thanks a lot for ur input. So ur suggesting bagging the 2.83 quad and doing a better OC on the 2.93 duo. If I could get to 3.8 that would be enough. But I only have the stock cpu heat sink + fan, or a cooler master tx3 evo I had on a AMD phenom quad that originally sounded like a jet engine.It's quite but not much of a cooler. Any suggestion on the mem timings? Reaper is the DAW I've been using lately and like most it will use whatever cores are available. I'll wait for Fingers reply before I switch back to the 2.93 duo. But let me know about my heat sink situation and the ram timings if u have time. Thanks!

message edited by ShawnyM


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#5
October 16, 2013 at 08:27:22
"So ur suggesting bagging the 2.83 quad and doing a better OC on the 2.93 duo"

Not necessarily, but it doesn't appear you pushed the E7500 nearly as far as you could have. What were your temp readings with the stock cooler?

"Any suggestion on the mem timings?"

Try running CPUZ & look at the SPD tab, the timings will be listed for the various frequencies. For example:

http://www.bjorn3d.com/Material/rev...

Download it here: http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-...


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#6
October 16, 2013 at 15:59:52
Riider has it right. I was just trying to give you the best options for the quad that you appear to have wanted. The E7500 will OC better with less heat than the quad but which you stay with will be your choice. If the E7500 is still in the system, you may want to try a better OC on it, but if the Q9505 is currently in then you might as well see how much you can push it. You CAN try for the best OC on the quad before even touching the memory settings, but if CPUZ (SPD tab) does show that the memory has the advanced settings, they are a no brainer for your OC so go with them (either set the EEP in BIOS or copy the settings from CPUZ and enter them manually). Once you get the best OC and the optimal memory settings (800/1600), then see how you like it during normal use. If not, then try the best for the E7500 and see if that is better for you.
I currently have the E7500 as well as the E8200 (not a great OC'er) but the E7500 is not in the motherboard that supports FSB1600 so I am limited but to switch them, I would have the E8200 running at stock settings.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
October 16, 2013 at 21:02:05
Ok. I've got the E7500 back in and have dropped the multiplier to 9 and the fsb is at 400 and I have no problems. I've got the Dram on auto. The manual selections are 667, 800, 887,1002.1066,1111,1335. I don't see a 400. I'm taking a guess to select 800 then check CPU-Z for the available timings. Should I proceed with the mem adjustments even though Its running fine? Core Temp says # 0 is maxing at 70c at 90% load. Normal working conditions is about 60% load. Do I still need a cpu v bump? I never thought to drop the multiplier and raise the fsb. Thanks for that tip.

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#8
October 16, 2013 at 21:57:58
Tried to go to 9.5 but it blue screens as Win7 loads. Selected 800 in Dram still blue screens. back to 9 again, mem at 800, Cpu-z coulum1 has top to bottom 444mhz, 6.0,6,6,16. Should I input this info into the bios for the mem timing? Thanks

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#9
October 17, 2013 at 20:14:57
DDR means Dual Data Rate that means that the actual memory speed of 400 yields an effective memory speed of 800 so the 800 is the one unless you can go with 1600 which is an actual speed or 800. Either is good to keep the CPU/RAM ratio correct.
CPU freq 400 x multiplier 400 x 9 = 3.6GHz
Memory freq 400 (or 800) x 2 = 800MHz (1600MHz)
CPU freq 400 x 4 (FSB multiplier) = FSB1600
With your base frequencies the same or the correct multiples or each other, you are running your components in sync with each other for the best interface and the best performance [CPU:RAM Ratio 1:1 or 1:2]. Good job.

As far as running it at a multiplier of 9.5 or possibly above, you now have to carefully watch the temperatures and test for stability. Post your temperatures at these points: Idle, normal use, Your max normal use (Gaming or extreme multitasking), and under Stress Testing. The reason for this is if your normal daily use numbers are reasonable and the stress numbers are far enough below the CPU maximum, you then can increase the VCore (CPU core voltage) one or two small notches and retest the system at the 9.5 multiplier. If it passes the stress test, observe the temperatures and decide then if you want to continue higher. Remember that both the CPU speed and the voltage can raise your temperatures. As long as the voltage is in the safe range for your CPU (0.85V - 1.3625V) and the temperature is in the acceptable range, you are fine. Once it gets hot too fast, you either need to back down on the VCore and probably the multiplier (as needed) or purchase an upgraded heat sink.
http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
October 18, 2013 at 00:17:46
Almost there. Win7 loaded at 9.5 after I adjusted the CPU vcore to 1.3. But as soon as I tried to load a program it blue screened. It would not load at 6-6-6-16 but did at 6-6-6-18. I don't see any ratio setting for CPU:RAM Ratio [CPU:RAM Ratio 1:1 or 1:2] . I am now back to 3.6 with the vcore at 1.3. The max temp under working conditions at 3.6 is 65c. Not sure how much higher it will go at 3.8. but the link u posted says 74c is the max. Here r some readings at 3.8.http://img29.imageshack.us/img29/3093/ox0a.jpg. FSB 400. Ratio 9.5 Dram 800, Manual timing 6-6-6-18 and vcore set to 1.3. everything else on auto. Not sure what to do at this point.

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#11
October 18, 2013 at 05:53:34
Your spd tab shows that the timings you are using are OK for 444 so they should be safe for 400 as well. At some point later, you can experiment with lowering some or all to 5's, but for now, it is not your problem with the OC so we can ignore it I think. The problem is that when you get past the very early stages of OC'ing you must adjust only one setting and then test it. Did you stress test it at 9.0 multiplier with a program like Prime95 or other stress tester? If not, then you need to go back and do that now. Once you establish that a setting will boot and do some basic things, you need to put it under stress to see if the setting is really good before going on, or you will never know what the issue is when it becomes unstable. It may be that you can go higher than 9.0, or it may be that you cannot and if you cannot, you then try lowering the VCore a bit and seeing if the stability is maintained. The reason for this is that if that is as high as you can go, you want to run it as cool as you can. If 9.0 is not stable 100%, you might need to increase the chipset voltage a very tiny bit and seeing it that has the desired effect. Remember, one adjustment and test. If 9.0 (3.6GHz) is your best 100% stable and the temps at that setting are good (not maximum with Prime95 and significantly lower the rest of the time), then that is not a bad OC for daily use (remember, you are looking for a computer to use, not a speed record or an expensive frying pan).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
October 22, 2013 at 22:42:58
Ok. My MB ASUS P5P43TDPRO died. Settings were FSB 400, ratio 9.5, Ram at 800/400. Timings 6-6-6-16. Vcore 1.34. Coolermaster heatsink. Max temp 55c. WHY? I'm looking for another board now. How bout the Gigabyte GA-EP43T-USB3?

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#13
October 23, 2013 at 15:50:09
I have had good results with the Gigabyte motherboards for these Core 2 CPU's. That should be a good OC board unless you can find the P45 series which will be slightly better.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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