PCChips M848a v5 OC BIOS

March 3, 2009 at 13:18:13
Specs: Windows XP
I have a PCChips m848a v5 motherboard and I'm looking for a BIOS that will allow me to overclock. I flashed with the Cheepoman chb127 BIOS, but it wouldn't let me change the voltage enough or the multiplier at all. What's worse is that I believe it to be reporting the CPU temp wrong now (77 C instead of 44 C with the official BIOS).

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#1
March 3, 2009 at 14:51:40
You can't change the multiplier on the vast majority of AMD socket A CPUs. It has nothing to do with the motherboard/BIOS, the multiplier is locked (on the CPU) at the factory. The only way to unlock it is to mod the CPU or the CPU socket. There's several different ways of doing it. Try googling unlock athlon xp...I assume that's what you have? And regardless of the Cheepoman BIOS, your board is a low end piece-o-crap based on the weak SiS 746FX chipset. You'd be much better off with a different board, preferrably one based on the nForce2.

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#2
March 3, 2009 at 21:02:47
It's an Athlon XP-M. The multiplier is supposed to be unlocked. That was one reason I bought it. The guy has screenshots of CPU-Z with it up to 2600 MHz (200 x 13). What boards are still for sale with that other chipset you mentioned, and which are good for overclocking??

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#3
March 3, 2009 at 21:21:40
The Asus A7N8X or ABIT NF7-S are two that come to mind. Beware; some models of the above boards aren't as good as the ones I listed. Gigabyte is another supplier but I don't know of a specific model. These boards are no longer made...you'll have to buy used or luck onto a vendor with a nos (new old stock) board.

jam will be along with the skinny on the A7N8X.

On a good board, a higher fsb and lower multi will perform better than 200X13.

Skip


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#4
March 5, 2009 at 07:35:33
I had an AXP-M 2400+ (actually I still have it) & ran it in an ASUS A7N8X-X, then moved it to a Shuttle AN35N Ultra. Both boards are based on different flavors of the nForce2. The ASUS board is based on the single channel nForce2 400 & the Shuttle board is based on the nForce2 Ultra 400 which supports dual channel. Both overclock well & are decent boards but I preferred the ASUS.

As Skip said, nForce2 boards generally aren't available anymore so eBay would be the place to look, or vendors that deal in NOS hardware.

If you feel like doing some reading, here's several old articles I have saved. If you don't read any of the others, make sure to check out the one in bold:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...


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#5
March 6, 2009 at 06:27:48
Interesting reading. Only a few of those can push a processor to 2+ volts. I'll need 1.9something volts to get this XP-M as high as the guaranteed speeds from the guy I bought it from. Do either of your recommended boards have BIOS updates that allow you to go beyond the 1.85v listed in the specs?

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#6
March 6, 2009 at 07:25:05
Why would you wanna push the CPU to it's limit? Don't get me wrong, I'm all for overclocking, but I'm not an extremist. Heat & voltage are the two things that can kill a CPU. I would be comfortable with the CPU at say, 2.4GHz @ 1.85v, but if I needed to overvolt to 2.0v to get it to run stably at 2.6GHz, I wouldn't do it. The extra 200MHz isn't worth the risk. Also, the nForce2 boards perform much better than the crappy SiS you have now, so the change in board/chipset alone will increase performance.

That being said, you're working with outdated hardware. IMO, unless you can get this stuff really cheap, you're just wasting your money. When you consider that you can get a low end dual core CPU, motherboard & 2GB DDR2-800 for about $100 & even at the default speed it will blow away your overclocked XPM, it is really worth doing what you're doing?


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#7
March 6, 2009 at 09:42:19
Even 1.85v on a continual basis makes me shudder. A Tbred can really make some heat with voltages like that and require a good cooling solution.

The extra .350v to get to 2.000v doesn't sound like much, but it's an immense amount in the processor world.

I'm all for an overclock that's "just crazy" but not for an overclock that's "just stupid".

Now, a comment on the "crappy SiS" and the like. VIA and ALi chipsets are also notorious for not having the ability to overclock. For your purpose, consider any chipset that is not an nForce2 off limits.

Skip


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#8
March 6, 2009 at 10:58:37
This is the chip I bought:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...

I think I will probably end up running it on the 2500 MHz settings, but if I can do more (stably), I want to have that option. If I kill it, I still have my Barton 2500 to use, so I'm not worried about it. Though if I do fry it, then I can learn from my experience and perhaps give a little boast to the 2500.

I bought this XP-M to experiment with over-clocking and to make my old system last a while longer without having to build a whole new one. I already have 2 gigs of Corsair PC3200, and I thought I could overclock on the board I have. I guess I was wrong. Instead of spending even more money on a whole new system, if I can get a good board that will make everything work together well, it's cheaper when considering my recent expenditures as sunk costs.

I certainly appreciate your concerns, but don't worry about it. I bought these things with my tax return ;)


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