Overclocking? Not sure that is what i am doin

Asrock / K7vm4
April 2, 2010 at 04:28:07
Specs: Windows XP, 1.6gb/2gb
Hi i have asked about the cpu before but someone suggested that i change a jumper on the mb and change bios settings therefore getting the cpu to run faster. I have no experience in this area. Is it overclocking? I bought the pc new some years back and it is advertised as XP2000 and runs at 1.6ghz according to the bios.
I still have the manual and founf the part where i think i am supposed to do the jumper thing on the MB. There are 3 options if you will for a jumper to be used or not. There are 3 pins called FSO and when i looked there is no jumper in place which according to the manual means that it is at 200mhz. I can put a jumper in place on the last two pins and it would be 333mhz or the first two and be 200mhz.
In the bios FS... said that is was auto but can be changed to manual then undernealth that it could be set from o-248mhz. I am supposed to set what the jumper is and the bios the same but if i want the highest i don't see how.
What i did do is just that. Bios at the highest and the MB with the jumper the same and now i get blackness on the screen. Should i just tell the bios 200mhz and the jumper on the MB?
On the first boot after the change i went into the bios and it said XP2600 instead of the previous XP2000.

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#1
April 2, 2010 at 06:03:48
Your explanation is a mess.

There are no Athlon XPs that run at 200MHz FSB. They all run at either 266, 333 or 400MHz FSB, depending on model. Look again at your manual. If no jumper is in place, it means the FSB is set at 266MHz, not 200MHz...that is correct for an AXP 2000+. To change to 200MHz FSB, the jumper must be on pins 1-2...to change to 333MHz FSB, the jumper must be on pins 2-3. Leave the jumper off!

What speed RAM do you have? With an AXP system, it's very important that the RAM runs at the same speed at the FSB. You *should* have DDR266. To successfully overclock, there are numerous settings that have to be changed.

- Spread Spectrum should be disabled
- CPU Host Frequency should be set to manual
- DRAM Frequency should be set to 133MHz (DDR266)
- CPU voltage may have to be increased. Unfortunately, your board doesn't allow for voltage adjustment.
- AGP should be locked at 66MHz, PCI at 33MHz. Unfortunately, you board doesn't allow for these adjustments.
- the lack of voltage control & PCI/AGP locking means that overcocking will be severely limited on your setup.

All you can really do is increase the FSB a little at a time & see what happens. Remember that with an AXP system, the FSB is "double-pumped", meaning that the true CPU frequency is 1/2 of the advertised FSB. So your CPU at 266MHz FSB is really running at 133MHz frequency. Your safe range for overclocking is 133-150MHz. If you go higher than 150MHz, the PCI/AGP will go to far out of spec & you'll encounter problems with the video, sound & anything else that runs on the PCI bus. That includes the IDE devices so you'll be risking data corruption on your hard drive.

Overclocking should be down carefully & methodically. Increase the frequency 3-5MHz at a time, save your settings, then reboot & test for stability.


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#2
April 2, 2010 at 06:12:09
In the manual under Jumpers setup>FSO it is says 200mhz/266mhz and 333mhz. I have it in front of me.

I reported what i saw wherever i stated so i don't understand anything more.

Ram is DDR400 i think. 2 gig all up. 1gig in each slot.

OK i am not sure about most of that but i think i should take out the jumper and redo some of the things as nothing is going to improve by the bios alone.

Will come back online in a sec as i have to shut both machines down to acheive anything.

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#3
April 2, 2010 at 06:42:09
OK I am back. I took the jumper out and got back into the bios. I took the CPU hos frequency back to Auto which it says the actual frequency is 133mhz.
Spread spectrum is disabled....i never touched that before.
Where is the cpu voltage in the bios?
DRAM frequency is on auto. Are you sure i should change that? The options are 133mhz(DDR266) or 166mhz(DDR333).
Where in the bios do i change the AGP and PCI thing. I can't find it. I have a AGP Nvidia card in the machine btw.

OK still not sure what your saying about changing the FSB a little at a time. Is that that thing that is at a maximum of 248mhz?

This is why i have never tackled or asked about overclocking before as anything i have read doesn't make sense to me. Maybe they haven't written something for beginners.

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#4
April 2, 2010 at 06:43:01
I have the manual right in front of me too. I downloaded it from the ASRock website earlier this morning. Page 12 states that pins 1-2 = 200MHz FSB, no jumper = 266MHz FSB, pins 2-3 = 333MHz FSB.

And I already told you what to do. Take the jumper cap off & leave it off! And if you have DDR400 RAM, change the setting to make it run as DDR266. You're only hurting performance by running the CPU & RAM out of sync...they need to both run at the same bus speed.

I've been overclocking for about 15 yrs & have a hell of a lot of experience with AMD socket A setups. If you want to attempt to overclock, do as I explained in my other response.


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#5
April 2, 2010 at 07:11:48
OK the manual is different then. I have the paper one that came with the....hang on it is the quick installation guide...sorry.
Ah well it wouldn't be much different? I dunno the info is as i said so...
OK odd....

The jumper cap is off. I said that!

OK changed the ram to run at DDR266.

I never changed this setting before so no blame here. I mean the DDR....never changed the setting in the bios.

I don't know what you said in the other response that i can understand. That is why i said that in my last response.
I know that some people like yourself are a hell of a lot better than me at computers and that is why i come here.

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#6
April 2, 2010 at 07:16:08
Oh one other thing....there was a warning and it said to put the cap on the jumper things to make it match what is change din the bios......the warning was in the bios when i went to change the 'actual frequency'. That is why i asked

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#7
April 2, 2010 at 07:18:52
OK now i understand about upping the thing....sorry my medical condition doesn't allow me to take in everything at once.....my brain says 'too much information and shuts down'. OK am taking it up little by little. What should i look for as far as stability when i boot? Something in particular?

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#8
April 2, 2010 at 07:39:07
FSB & DDR speeds are bogus...they are theoretical, not actual. You should always work with actual frequencies.

On AMD socket A systems, FSB = frequency x 2. So when you see 266MHz FSB, simple divide by 2 to get the actual frequency. 266/2 = 133MHz.

On Intel socket 423, 478 & 775 systems, FSB = frequency x 4. So when you see 800MHz FSB, divide by 4....800/4 = 200MHz frequency.

ALL DDR RAM (DDR1, DDR2, DDR3) speeds should be divided by 2 to get the actual frequency. DDR400/2 = 200MHz. Or if the RAM is rated by bandwidth, PC3200 for example, simply divide by 16. PC3200/16 = 200MHz frequency.

AMD systems are relatively simple to configure. All systems prior to the Atlon 64 should be setup with a CPU:DRAM frequency ratio of 1:1. In other words, for best performance, the CPU & DRAM frequencies should always match. If the CPU is at 133MHz, the RAM should be at 133MHz...if the CPU is at 145MHz, the RAM should be at 145MHz, & so on.

Athlon 64 systems don't have a FSB so none of the above applies.

Unfortuinately, your board doesn't have all the necessary options for decent overclocking. That is tyical of most VIA based boards. There's no voltage adjustment & no way to lock the PCI/AGP, so that severely limits what you can accomplish. Just do as I explained. Start with both the CPU & RAM at 133MHz (aka 266MHz FSB & DDR266), then increase the CPU frequency a little at a time. The RAM will automatically overclock along with the CPU. Start by raising the CPU freq from 133MHz to 140MHz & see what happens.


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#9
April 2, 2010 at 07:40:39
"What should i look for as far as stability when i boot? Something in particular?"

If it blue screens, it's unstable...if it locks up, it's unstable...if it becomes unbootable, it's unstable. Believe me, if you take it too far, you'll know it.


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#10
April 2, 2010 at 07:54:49
Ohhhhh ok now i understand!!!! Thanks your good at explaining that!

OK maybe that is why no one suggested overclocking to me before. Ah well i am keeping an eye out for another machine but i will take my time. The machine seems to be working well and i don't expect a lot out of it anyway.

I have gradually overclocked all the way to 150mhz and everything seems to work well. I did a video capture...smooth! No blue screens or anything so i am happy with that. The bios is reporting XP2200 now.

Yeah I was a bit afraid before when the screen was black before i asked for your help so i am glad i jumped on computing.net!

:0) Thanks!!!!

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#11
April 2, 2010 at 12:55:37
I test my Athlon XP overclocks with toast. It tortures the processor and doesn't take all day to give a good idea if the overclock is stable. Run it for at least 10 minutes and watch temperatures closely.

http://majorgeeks.com/Toast_d867.html

To monitor temps, try MBM5; it supports your motherboard.

Toast will usually push your processor to it's max temperature in about 6 or 7 minutes so make sure you're watching Motherboard Monitor temps while Toast runs. If Toast locks up or you get a blue screen, reboot and back off a little until you can run Toast for at least 10 minutes...longer is ok too.

http://majorgeeks.com/Motherboard_M...

Skip


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#12
April 6, 2010 at 09:37:04
Well toast was run for over and hour with no problems so i guess i am set?!

I will download the other thing tomorrow. Downloading something else right now!

Thanks :0)

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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#13
April 10, 2010 at 21:27:34
OK got the Motherboard program. Not sure what to do with it. Seems really complex. I see it can make a log file. Interval log or SysLog.

"The meaning of life is to be happy and useful" Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama


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