Overclocking Core 2 Duo E4600

December 9, 2010 at 16:55:13
Specs: Windows 7
Could I be able to overclock my Intel Core 2 Duo E4600 from 2.40 Ghz to 3.00 Ghz on Gigabyte G41M-ES2L? If so, how should I go about doing this?

PC Specs:
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo E4600 2.40 GHz
RAM: Trancsend DDR2 2GB (x2)
Motherboard: Gigabyte G41M-ES2L (Dual Bios)
Graphics Card: nVidia GeForce 9400 GT XFX (1GB)
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate x64
HDD: Maxtor 160GB S-ATA (Internal) Maxtor: One Touch 1TB USB (External)


See More: Overclocking Core 2 Duo E4600

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#1
December 9, 2010 at 18:44:52
Unfortuantely, you will not be able to run the coveted 1:1 ratio due to the way the "System Memory Multiplier" is tied to the CPU default FSB. Try these settings for 3.0GHz:

CPU Clock Ratio = 12x
CPU Host Clock Control = enabled
CPU Host Frequency = 250MHz
PCI Express Frequency = 100MHz
System Memory Multiplier = 2.66
Memory Frequency = 667MHz 667MHz


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#2
December 9, 2010 at 19:18:30
If u play new games buy another v-card(gaming video card).

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let him who desires piece prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#3
December 9, 2010 at 19:55:09
You will need to learn about OC'ing because it is a process rather than just plugging in numbers. It often requires experimentation and some combinations do not post and you will need to reset your CMOS. Look up this in your manual so you know ahead of time what to do and where to find it. You will see on your board and/or your manual's picture of it that you have to close the contact on the CMOS jumper (near the 'coin' battery) if it fails to post and fails to recover (it usually will recover on your board due to Gigabyte's dual BIOS) only after removing the power plug on the back of your computer.
That said, you should be able to reach your target number (only because you are using a separate graphics card) though you failed to list the speed of your RAM. This will matter in calculating the best possible combinations to use on your settings. Assuming you already know how to access your your BIOS, you will need to turn off Speed Step and C1E and make some adjustments manually. Depending upon the speed of your RAM, there are some possibilities:
If 800MHz RAM:
CPU Clock Ratio:9X** Key number you will need to adjust as you adjust Host Freq.
CPU Host Clock Control: Manual
CPU Host Frequency:333** Key number you will need to 'play' with.
PCI Express Frequency:Manual:100 (always set to 100 for overclocking)
System Memory Multiplier:Manual:2.0(if available) 2.4(workable but not as good) *Note if you only show a higher memory multiplier available, we you will need to start with a lower Host Freq. and a higher CPU Multiplier. You do not want the right memory frequency number to higher than the speed your memory is rated at.
333x9=3GHz
If this fails to post, or resets to default settings, then set everything but temporarily with a lower CPU multiplier (try 7X). if it posts fine, try using the 8X multiplier, BUT raise your Vcore voltage manually ONLY one small step up and see if that posts. If it does, then try the 9X multiplier. If it does not post, then reset again and try a second small step up on the Vcore voltage. When you get a good post and boot into Windows, you will need to run a few utilities (download and install ahead of time) CPU-Z to check your results and your RAM speed and Speedfan to monitor your internal temperatures (VERY important when overclocking). If everything is set according to your specs and your temperatures are reasonable, you will need to stress test your new setting for stability while monitoring your temperatures. Prime95 is a very popular test to prove your stability.
If 667MHz RAM:
Use above except:
CPU Multiplier:11
CPU Host Frequency:278
Memory multiplier 2.40
278x11=3.06GHz
Post back results for more advice. Read up on overclocking.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
This site is about helping people, lets keep it that way.


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#4
December 10, 2010 at 04:31:51
I tried both suggestions by mickliq and Fingers, unfortunately for me, I can't OC my processor. BIOS error says the voltage is too high. Guess I'll have to live with low res gaming (800x600). I'll just probably buy a new desktop with better specs. Thanks to all that answered.

EDIT: Any suggestions for a better gaming desktop?

P.S. I'm not a newbie when it comes to computers, just to OCing. Just want some more ideas before I go buy a new desktop. As the expression goes "Two heads are better than one". Thanks in advance for any feedbacks.


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#5
December 10, 2010 at 05:00:45
"Memory multiplier 2.40"

I didn't think the 2.40 multiplier was an option with an 800MHz FSB CPU? That's why I went with 2.66.

"BIOS error says the voltage is too high"

You don't need to touch the voltage settings, if you did, change the settings back to AUTO.

"I'll have to live with low res gaming"

Your poor gaming has nothing to do with the CPU, the problem is the video card. The 9400GT is NOT a gaming card.

"want some more ideas before I go buy a new desktop"

You don't need a new desktop, you need a gaming video card. Have a look at this article:

Best Graphics Cards For The Money: November 2010


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#6
December 10, 2010 at 08:30:44
U didn't bother read my response #2.

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let him who desires piece prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#7
December 10, 2010 at 13:56:06
That board has a tendency to raise the core voltage too high when it is on automatic. See what the voltage is at stock settings, then if you try to OC again, set to Manual and keep the voltage at stock or a minimum step or two above it. I originally used that board with an E2160 (I think it was around 2.7GHz) and now with an E7500 @3.52GHz and I noticed that tendency just before someone warned me about it. Sorry I forgot to mention it before.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
This site is about helping people, lets keep it that way.


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#8
December 10, 2010 at 22:14:22
So I should set the voltage to 1.3 or less?

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#9
December 11, 2010 at 08:11:28
I don't know the stock vcore for c2d e4600 but i do know the safe range (1.162-1.312v) if it exceed 1.312v u will damage cpu.

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires piece prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#10
December 11, 2010 at 16:44:28
You could set the BIOS to 'load optimum settings' and save, then go back in the BIOS and write down default voltage setting, then set to manual, then try holding the voltage at that setting, bringing up a little if you need to. The 'safe range' voltages kuwese refers to above are definitely safe, but you will find that on the Overclock Forums they are taking about voltages of 1.45Vcore and even higher when doing EXTREME overclocking with liquid cooling (or even liquid Nitrogen). You are probably looking for a stable overclock for everyday use and should not approach that range. The MOST important thing to watch is your temperatures since a high temperature will fry your CPU faster than a little extra voltage (within reason). Your cooling method will limit your overclock to a practical level.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
This site is about helping people, lets keep it that way.


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