Solved Old cpu, overclock or get new?

October 15, 2011 at 16:34:13
Specs: Windows XP, Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 3.00GHz // 2GB ram
Hello, i currently have a "Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 3.00GHz" cpu on a "Dell Dell DXP051" motherboard (or at least this is what Everest calls it). Chipset: "i945G/P".

It has been getting too slow in general for the newer games / high cpu applications (3D software & such) since it already is 6 years old.
Can i overclock it to gain back enough speed to run the newer games decently & how much % performance gain could i get?
Is it even worth overclocking such a old cpu? If i need a new one i'm thinking about getting a "Intel® Core™2 Duo Processor E7500 (3M Cache, 2.93 GHz, 1066 MHz FSB)", any idea if this would fit on my motherboard?

Some extra info:
Original clockspeed: 3000 Mhz

Front Side Bus Properties:
Bus Type Intel NetBurst ---- i heard this was "old/inefficient"?
Bus Width 64-bit
Real Clock 200 MHz (QDR)
Effective Clock 800 MHz
Bandwidth 6400 MB/s



See More: Old cpu, overclock or get new?

Report •

✔ Best Answer
October 16, 2011 at 09:50:11
"maybe it would be cheaper to just replace the entire motherboard"

Not gonna happen. Unfortunately, you have an outdated BTX system, meaning the board & case are azz-backwards. It was a brainstorm idea of Intel to help with the cooling of the Prescott based CPUs. The BTX format was short-lived & died a quick death.

As I stated in my other response, a big part of your performance problem is the graphics. The 7300GS was an entry level card when it was released 5-6 yrs ago & certainly hasn't gotten any better. It's only a minor step up from onboard graphics, it is NOT a gaming card. To put it bluntly, it's a low end piece of crap. It's not going to hold you over for another 2-4 yrs. There are plenty of cheap gaming cards on the market & being that your board has a PCIe slot, that it where you should be spending your money. Even if you have a low wattage power supply, there are a few cards that should work & still offer decent gaming performance. Here's one example:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...



#1
October 15, 2011 at 18:23:15
If you have a Dell, you're not going to be able to overclock it, so you can scratch that idea. And you are correct about the netburst architecture used for the P4 & it's derivatives. It's old, inefficient, & just plain sucks. The P4 was probably the worst CPU Intel ever produced. However, gaming relies on the graphics card so if you're still using the motherboard's onboard Intel graphics, that's a good part of your problem. What model Dell do you have?

Report •

#2
October 15, 2011 at 18:27:45
I have a Dell DIMENSION 9150.
The graphics card is one i bought more recently, a NVIDIA GeForce 7300 GS

Report •

#3
October 15, 2011 at 20:03:14
Look at this:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/2...
Your specs:
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...
So probably not.
You could do a lot better for gaming with a better graphics card, if your power supply can support it, or you plan to upgrade that too.
BUT this is a very old system, so I really would not recommend spending too much on it. Spend the minimum that will make you happy for now, but plan/save for something newer, better, faster.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
October 15, 2011 at 20:18:12
Hmm, maybe it would be cheaper to just replace the entire motherboard (instead of getting a new PC). Both the graphic card & HD are less then 2 years old, so they should run fine for at least another 2-4 years.
After that, the only old part would be the suppy (and the casing lol).

If that is possible of course, as i don't see much motherboards being sold seperately.


Report •

#5
October 16, 2011 at 09:50:11
✔ Best Answer
"maybe it would be cheaper to just replace the entire motherboard"

Not gonna happen. Unfortunately, you have an outdated BTX system, meaning the board & case are azz-backwards. It was a brainstorm idea of Intel to help with the cooling of the Prescott based CPUs. The BTX format was short-lived & died a quick death.

As I stated in my other response, a big part of your performance problem is the graphics. The 7300GS was an entry level card when it was released 5-6 yrs ago & certainly hasn't gotten any better. It's only a minor step up from onboard graphics, it is NOT a gaming card. To put it bluntly, it's a low end piece of crap. It's not going to hold you over for another 2-4 yrs. There are plenty of cheap gaming cards on the market & being that your board has a PCIe slot, that it where you should be spending your money. Even if you have a low wattage power supply, there are a few cards that should work & still offer decent gaming performance. Here's one example:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


Report •

#6
October 16, 2011 at 11:29:34
While my graphic card isn't the greatest either, the current bottleneck of my system is the CPU (same program that lags badly on my PC works fine on a other PC with similar grapics card & better CPU)

If replacing the motherboard is impossible, i'll just get a entire new PC as Fingers recommended.

Thanks a lot for your help, you saved me from buying a new motherboard only to find out it wouldn't fit in my case :D


Report •

#7
October 16, 2011 at 12:25:27
"the current bottleneck of my system is the CPU"

I'm definitely not a fan of th P4 or Pentium D, but I don't think the CPU is your problem. Your video card sucks & you only have 2GB RAM. I have no idea what you have installed, whether you've ever tweaked XP for best performance (turned off indexing, disabled system restore, disabled themes, etc), whether you have a lot of crap loading at startup, whether you have any toolbars installed, whether you're using a lightweight security program or crapware such as Norton or McAfee, etc, etc. There are a LOT of things that you can do to clean up excess/useless garbage & significantly improve performance.


Report •

#8
October 16, 2011 at 12:43:09
I checked my CPU in this list: http://www.speedtraq.com/?s=1 which gives it a Rating Time of about 4x
One of the things that lag is playing HD video's (using media player classic & CCCP codecs), checking in the task manager, video's start to lag after reaching the 50% CPU cap (which i believe comes from fully using a single core?)

Same for games, single process, caps at 50% cpu, starts to lag.

This should be unrelated to any startup processes / antivirus (which is AVG free btw) / etc... ?


Report •

#9
October 16, 2011 at 20:36:46
"video's start to lag after reaching the 50% CPU cap (which i believe comes from fully using a single core?)"

You must be using some pretty old codecs. I've never used MPC, but I can recommend VLC. It is multi-threaded, so it should use both CPU cores. But an even better H.264 decoder is CoreAVC. It's so efficient that I can play 720p MKV files on a 1.8GHz PIII. CoreAVC isn't free, but perhaps you know a little more about obtaining software for free than I do...

"Same for games, single process, caps at 50% cpu, starts to lag."

Older games were mostly single-threaded, but I suspect that your video card is holding you back.

"which is AVG free btw"

Microsoft Security Essentials is much better.

Socket 939 | Dual-core Opteron 185 @ 3.2GHz | 4GB | 1.0TB | Win7 x64
GeForce GTX 460 1GB | X-Fi Ti Pro | A8N32-SLI Deluxe | Antec P182


Report •

#10
October 18, 2011 at 18:12:41
@jackbomb, thanks :D
CoreAVC really boosted the performance, most 720p runs smooth now.

I remember not really liking VLC when i used it several years ago but gave it a try again. some movies lag in 1 player while working fine in the other, guess i'll keep both of them around :)


Report •

Ask Question