manufacturing technology

August 18, 2009 at 12:41:25
Specs: Windows XP
hi all im wondering what this means manufacturing technology is see this mentioned in the cpu info i.e. 90nm which is the best to go for if its an important factor..??

also what is the core stepping bit..??

basically i have a 2.8ghz processor at the mo intel p4 but its only a 533mhz fsb and i have 3200 transend memory so im going for an 800mhz bus to complement the memory as i believe its better to do this so im told

but i dont really want to buy a processor that is crap..!!!

any help hill be great

by the way its a 478 socket cheers


See More: manufacturing technology

Report •


#1
August 18, 2009 at 13:07:01
Socket 478 is obsolete.......

Does your Motherboard support 800fsb ??

What versions of Socket 478 Celeron/Pentium 4 does you motherboard support ??

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_4

What do you hope to achieve ???


Report •

#2
August 18, 2009 at 14:06:53
yes i know 478 is old cpu now...!!! the mb is an asrock p4vm890 and yes it supports 800mhz cpu's

any further help is great


Report •

#3
August 18, 2009 at 14:25:54
The fastest Northwood C (800Mhz) you'll find is 3.4Ghz. The board also supports Prescott processors but stay away from those; they gobble power and run hot.

You'd be nuts to spend more than 10 bucks on a faster 800Mhz processor; the fsb increase and raw Mhz increase just won't translate into a performance increase you can "see".

Skip


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 18, 2009 at 14:42:31
hi thank's for the info....yes i know its not very much increase to be honest i found a cpu but i thought i was very expensive especially for a second user cpu... £49.99 gbp big buck's

all im looking for is a little compliment towards the memory i have just put in it..!!

also my cpu temp is around 85 degrees which im sure is to hot


Field Value
Sensor Properties
Sensor Type Winbond W83697HF (ISA 290h)
GPU Sensor Type Diode (NV-Diode)
Chassis Intrusion Detected No

Temperatures
Motherboard 41 °C (106 °F)
CPU 85 °C (185 °F)
GPU Diode 46 °C (115 °F)
Seagate ST3160212ACE 38 °C (100 °F)
Seagate ST340016A 38 °C (100 °F)

Cooling Fans
CPU 2428 RPM
Chassis 3342 RPM

Voltage Values
CPU Core 1.58 V
+3.3 V 3.34 V
+5 V 5.13 V
+12 V 11.73 V
+5 V Standby 5.04 V

thats data took using everest


Report •

#5
August 18, 2009 at 15:01:09
Wow, £50 should buy the whole durn machine...not just a processor.

85°C is very hot; enough to have an effect on performance. Have you blown the dust out of the heatsink and checked the heatsink fan speed? 41° is also elevated unless it's awful warm in your house. If your case gets intake air from a little "vacuum cleaner" slot at the front bottom, make sure it's not sitting on carpet.

Skip


Report •

#6
August 18, 2009 at 15:03:22
yep cpu fan speed is shown there and cpu cooler is clean to be honest i am going to take it out and re apply some thermal paste i think...!!!! cheers for that..!!

Report •

#7
August 18, 2009 at 15:20:53
Good instructions to follow regardless of the brand of compound you use...

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/app...

I'd be looking for idle temps in the 30's and full load temps in the 60's for a Northwood B; higher if it's a Prescott core. Let us know what the sSpec number is on the processor; 5 digits starting with "S".

Skip


Report •

#8
August 18, 2009 at 15:46:54
im sure it was sl6pf but i may be wrong.....

Report •

#9
August 18, 2009 at 15:53:39
got it its sl6hl

Report •

#10
August 18, 2009 at 23:16:25
To put it in perspective, you can buy a reasonable spec P4 478 3000mhz (Hyper Threading) Tower for £60-70, I sell them with 15" TFT monitors £90-100 (also sell Skt754 3000+ for similar dosh).

http://www.friday-ad.co.uk/AdRef/YI...

Anything older than 1996 has had it day when it comes to upgrading economically.............. ie thats Socket A / 478 / 754 / 939


Report •

#11
August 19, 2009 at 07:16:03
2e0saf,

You need to understand a few things about your system.

The P4 is a highly inefficient CPU. One way to partially make up for that inefficiency is to run the RAM at a higher frequency than the CPU. For CPU's other than the P4, the optimal CPU:DRAM frequency ratio is 1:1, but for the P4 it should be either 3:4 or 4:5, depending on the base frequency of the CPU you're working with. In the case of a 533MHz FSB P4 (133MHz freq), you should be using the 4:5 ratio. That would put the RAM freq at 166MHz (DDR333, aka PC2700).

If you were to get an 800MHz FSB CPU (200MHz freq) to pair up with your PC3200 RAM (200MHz freq), the ratio would be 1:1. Your system would perform better due to the FSB increase from 533 to 800MHz, but it wouldn't perform optimally because the ratio wouldn't be optimal.

You have to look at the BIG picture. You have a board that's based on a VIA chipset, a 533MHz FSB CPU & PC3200. So not only is your system obsolete, it's poorly configured. The saving grace is that both the 2.8GHz Northwood & your board are highly overclockable. So rather than wasting your money on a new CPU, why not just overclock what you have & optimize the settings at the same time?

But before you proceed, you need to get the temperatures under control. The board of 41C is high...what is your average room temp? And 85C for the CPU is extremely high...you're at the point where the CPU will begin throttling. Where are you getting these readings from...software? Check the BIOS. I suspect those readings are incorrect.

http://processorfinder.intel.com/de...

http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.a...


Report •

#12
August 19, 2009 at 08:20:24
hi jam thanks for all that info...!! here are the last reading's from everest

Field Value
Sensor Properties
Sensor Type Winbond W83697HF (ISA 290h)
GPU Sensor Type Diode (NV-Diode)
Chassis Intrusion Detected No

Temperatures
Motherboard 42 °C (108 °F)
CPU 41 °C (106 °F)
GPU Diode 47 °C (117 °F)
Seagate ST3160212ACE 39 °C (102 °F)
Seagate ST340016A 39 °C (102 °F)

Cooling Fans
CPU 2446 RPM
Chassis 3375 RPM

Voltage Values
CPU Core 1.57 V
+3.3 V 3.34 V
+5 V 5.13 V
+12 V 11.73 V
+5 V Standby 5.02 V


but i still wouldt say they are acurate but i did cool the cpu right down

and here is everest overclock info

Field Value
CPU Properties
CPU Type Intel Pentium 4
CPU Alias Northwood
CPU Stepping C1
Engineering Sample No
CPUID CPU Name Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 2.80GHz
CPUID Revision 00000F27h

CPU Speed
CPU Clock 2800.1 MHz (original: 2800 MHz)
CPU Multiplier 21x
CPU FSB 133.3 MHz (original: 133 MHz)
Memory Bus 100.0 MHz
DRAM:FSB Ratio 3:4

CPU Cache
L1 Trace Cache 12K Instructions
L1 Data Cache 8 KB
L2 Cache 512 KB (On-Die, ECC, ATC, Full-Speed)

Motherboard Properties
Motherboard ID 63-181-0000010-00101111-072407-VIA$P4M89181_P4VM890 BIOS P1.90
Motherboard Name ASRock P4VM890 (3 PCI, 1 PCI-E x16, 1 AMR, 2 DDR DIMM, Audio, Video, LAN)

Chipset Properties
Motherboard Chipset VIA P4M890
Memory Timings 2.5-2-2-5 (CL-RCD-RP-RAS)
Command Rate (CR) 2T
DIMM2: Transcend 1 GB PC3200 DDR SDRAM (3.0-3-3-8 @ 200 MHz) (2.5-3-3-7 @ 166 MHz)
DIMM4: Transcend 1 GB PC3200 DDR SDRAM (3.0-3-3-8 @ 200 MHz) (2.5-3-3-7 @ 166 MHz)

BIOS Properties
System BIOS Date 07/24/07
Video BIOS Date 10/13/08
DMI BIOS Version P1.90

Graphics Processor Properties
Video Adapter nVIDIA GeForce 8400 GS
GPU Code Name G98GS (PCI Express 1.0 x16 10DE / 06E4, Rev A2)
GPU Clock (Geometric Domain) 567 MHz (original: 567 MHz)
GPU Clock (Shader Domain) 1400 MHz (original: 1400 MHz)
Memory Clock 351 MHz (original: 350 MHz)


i have never over clocked the thing because really im not sure how...!!!!

any help there would be great thank.s regards sean


Report •

#13
August 19, 2009 at 08:22:48
jam i forgot to mention the temp readings are the same in the bios as well...!!! cheers

Report •

#14
August 19, 2009 at 08:28:17
I didn't need to know any of the above....I already know your system configuration. What are you temperature readings from the BIOS??

Apparently you're not into gaming? If you are, you made a poor video card choice.

EDIT: I see you posted about the BIOS readings while I was responding. But I did spot something wrong in your settings. You're running the CPU at 133MHz & the RAM at 100MHz? And the ratio is reported as 3:4. The ratio would be 4:3. In actuality, the CPU should be at 133MHz & RAM at 200MHz with the ratio reported as 2:3.

I don't know if you're copy/pasting that info or you're keying it in, but something's definitely wrong. And if that info is correct, your BIOS settings are a mess.


Report •

#15
August 19, 2009 at 10:28:06
so how do i get the cpu and memory to read correctly.... yes just copied an dpasted from everest program..!!

Report •

#16
August 19, 2009 at 10:47:07
i made a few changes in bios and now getting this reading...!!!

Field Value
CPU Properties
CPU Type Intel Pentium 4
CPU Alias Northwood
CPU Stepping C1
Engineering Sample No
CPUID CPU Name Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 2.80GHz
CPUID Revision 00000F27h

CPU Speed
CPU Clock 2822.1 MHz (original: 2800 MHz)
CPU Multiplier 21x
CPU FSB 134.4 MHz (original: 133 MHz)
Memory Bus 168.0 MHz
DRAM:FSB Ratio 5:4

i have the cpu freq on auto 133mhz



Report •

#17
August 19, 2009 at 11:00:40
and this is the readings i get with the memory set at 200mhz ddr400 and auto cpu setting 133mhz

Field Value
CPU Properties
CPU Type Intel Pentium 4
CPU Alias Northwood
CPU Stepping C1
Engineering Sample No
CPUID CPU Name Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 2.80GHz
CPUID Revision 00000F27h

CPU Speed
CPU Clock 2800.1 MHz (original: 2800 MHz)
CPU Multiplier 21x
CPU FSB 133.3 MHz (original: 133 MHz)
Memory Bus 200.0 MHz
DRAM:FSB Ratio 6:4

im now not sure what else to set up...!!!

cheers for your help jam....

p.s. where are you located


Report •

#18
August 19, 2009 at 11:36:58
Normally the ratio is given as FSB:DRAM in which case the proper ratio for your setup would be 2:3. Your ratio is being reported in reverse - DRAM:FSB - so it should be 3:2. Regardless, you now have it right at 6:4 which reduces to 3:2.

I'm in western NY.


Report •

#19
August 19, 2009 at 12:01:56
great so how do i over clock the cpu... or would still benefit from buying a better cpu i can get a 3.2 800mhz fsb northwood reasonable price... SL6WG or would a prescott cpu be ok i believe they are power hungry tho and someone did mention to steer away from those cpu's cheers again... im in uk jam i was actually going to give you my phone number to call if you were in uk however any help would be great... regards sean...!!!

also if you have a better solution like replace the complete main board i would consider this if you cold give me some idea's i use ebay.co.uk and they do quite a few bundles on there fairly well priced maybe the same form factor tho would be a bonus..!!! cheers


Report •

#20
August 19, 2009 at 12:21:24
I'll download the user manual for your board & get back to you with some overclock suggestions a little later. Hang in there....

Report •

#21
August 19, 2009 at 12:27:16
ok jam thank's regards sean

Report •

#22
August 20, 2009 at 19:27:11
Doesn't this board have Untied OC Technology where the pci-e and pci busses are locked?

Turn off any Spread Spectrum settings in BIOS and just start bumping up the fsb from 133Mhz. 3-5Mhz at a time would probably be safe.

Keep a close watch on cpu temperatures. You can test for stability with a program like SuperPi. CPU temps for a P4 will have a large variation from idle to full load. Don't be alarmed if you see 70°C when running SuperPI.

http://files.extremeoverclocking.co...

You will run into a wall somewhere...we just don't know when.

142 or 143Mhz will give you a 3Ghz machine; 152Mhz would be needed for 3.2Ghz, and so forth. Don't get in a big hurry and a notebook of your changes and the results will come in handy.

Skip


Report •


Ask Question