Solved Intel CPU upgrade not at full speed

June 11, 2011 at 09:49:56
Specs: Windows XP, Windows 2000, Intel Pentium e5800 @3.2GHz, 2GB DDR2 SDRAM (2x1GB,800MHz PC-6400
Hello,

I have just installed an Intel Pentium e5800 to replace a slower Intel Pentium e2140. Anyways, the CPU never runs at full speed. Ever. According to Core Temp 0.99.8 and CPU-Z it always stays at 1.2GHz even when I ran Orthos Prime 2004 (uses 100% CPU). This computer:

- is a Lenovo 3000 J200 9690-5AU
- has said processor from above (Socket 775/Socket T)
- has 2GB RAM (DDR2, dual channel, PC-6400 @ 800 MHz)
- has a GeForce G210 (Yes, I know, it stinks, but I'm fine with it)
- has a 280W LITE-ON PSU
- has a Hitachi Deskstar HDT725032VLA380 320 GB SATA 3.0Gb/s HDD
- has integrated sound and Ethernet networking capabilities.

Anything? It's rather annoying.


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✔ Best Answer
June 14, 2011 at 19:00:06
I could not find much on the machine as far as CPU support, but I did find out what chipset it uses and that is the Intel 645GC Express and that does have a CPU support list:
http://www.cpu-upgrade.com/mb-Intel...
While some CPU's supported by the chipset will not be supported by your BIOS, none of the CPU that are NOT on the list can be supported and the one you have is NOT on the CPU support list.
This means for you is that IF it is recognized at all by your board/BIOS it will not run properly and probably at a much lower setting than the CPU is designed to run at. This is exactly what you found out when you purchased a CPU without first checking if it was supported by your board. You will need to either purchase a different CPU that is on the list (link above) for a chance that it is supported by your BIOS (check with the mfg. support first to be sure) or purchase a board that supports the CPU you purchased (and possibly other components). This is still an older machine with older technology so do not get in too deep spending a lot of money to upgrade it since you will probably not be very happy with it for too long anyway. Better would be to save up for a new machine or a completely new build.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
June 11, 2011 at 11:31:27
Is it officially supported they are different cores etcetera, see:

http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/s...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...

The IntelĀ® 945GC Express Chipset supports the following:

http://ark.intel.com/chipset.aspx?f...

It appears you bought on Socket not BIOS Support ???


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#2
June 11, 2011 at 11:38:19
SpeedStep (EIST) is most likely enabled & doing it's job. When you look at CPUZ, what is shown for the CPU multiplier? Is it x 6.0 ? Under Specification, does it show E5800 @ 3.2GHz?

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#3
June 11, 2011 at 12:20:44
mickliq, does it not depend on Chipset support as well ?, just curious !

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Related Solutions

#4
June 11, 2011 at 13:42:42
SpeedStep IS enabled, multi is at 6.0, but even under full load it doesn't change a bit. CPU-Z, Core Temp, Windows AND the (lousy) BIOS say it is an e5800 @ 3.2 GHz.

At least at that mode my cpu temp doesn't go over 40 degrees C. ._.

EDIT: Any way to disable EIST (SpeedStep)?
Lousy OEM bios has no options i know of.


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#5
June 11, 2011 at 13:59:00
In non of my research does it state that the CPU you installed is officially supported, and yes if you buy a crippled OEM PC you have to live with limitations !!

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#6
June 11, 2011 at 14:49:15
I think the CPU is faulty...

- Full load always keeps e5800 at 1.2 GHz
- Intel Processor ID Utility, Core Temp, CPU-Z all say 1.2 GHz as well

Anyone?


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#7
June 11, 2011 at 22:45:13
There's nothing wrong with the CPU. How are you load testing it?

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#8
June 12, 2011 at 15:44:01
Just ran CPU-Z with Prime95, and Task Manager states 100% cpu usage on both cores. No change in frequency whatsoever. Also used Orthos Prime, 100% CPU, both cores, same speed. I also reseated the processor and applied new thermal paste, to no avail.

In normal usage, it also feels a bit sluggish. The old E2140 didn't (and doesn't) have the issue. I'll be getting a replacement soon...


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#9
June 12, 2011 at 18:10:24
When you changed the CPU did you reset the CMOS through jumper or by removing the 'coin' battery for a number of seconds (power disconnected)? You need to do this for the BIOS to completely erase all of the prior settings of the previous CPU and detect them from scratch. Then just to be sure you can 'reset defaults' or 'reset optimal settings' in BIOS.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
June 13, 2011 at 12:40:11
I'll try that idea later on, fingers. Will report if it works.

Meanwhile I have the e2140 in the pc right now, it does run at full speed occasionally and slows at idle, so EIST works there.

Otherwise, i hate the stock cooler. Looks and performs wimpy.


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#11
June 14, 2011 at 04:35:43
Cleared CMOS prior to install of the E5800, no avail. Was required to reset the RTC and stuff (duh)

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#12
June 14, 2011 at 19:00:06
✔ Best Answer
I could not find much on the machine as far as CPU support, but I did find out what chipset it uses and that is the Intel 645GC Express and that does have a CPU support list:
http://www.cpu-upgrade.com/mb-Intel...
While some CPU's supported by the chipset will not be supported by your BIOS, none of the CPU that are NOT on the list can be supported and the one you have is NOT on the CPU support list.
This means for you is that IF it is recognized at all by your board/BIOS it will not run properly and probably at a much lower setting than the CPU is designed to run at. This is exactly what you found out when you purchased a CPU without first checking if it was supported by your board. You will need to either purchase a different CPU that is on the list (link above) for a chance that it is supported by your BIOS (check with the mfg. support first to be sure) or purchase a board that supports the CPU you purchased (and possibly other components). This is still an older machine with older technology so do not get in too deep spending a lot of money to upgrade it since you will probably not be very happy with it for too long anyway. Better would be to save up for a new machine or a completely new build.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
June 16, 2011 at 13:09:59
Well...crap.

Wonder what to do now... but I won't need help for that!
Thanks to all who helped.


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#14
June 16, 2011 at 14:03:36
Response #12 well I stated that in response #1 it is not supported, so it took that long and no one read what I linked to...

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#15
June 16, 2011 at 18:39:25
Cloud... Sometimes it is better to explain it clearly, in this case it took many more words but the message got through. Just stating that it is not supported and giving the link would be enough for someone who understands it better, but then they would not need reminding that they need to check the support list in the first place. It did take some looking around though to find even the chipset it used, and by the time I reviewed the entire post for where he went wrong, I actually missed your link also.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
June 16, 2011 at 21:29:40
#5 "In non of my research does it state that the CPU you installed is officially supported, and yes if you buy a crippled OEM PC you have to live with limitations !!"


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