Solved i7-950 Running VERY Hot

November 14, 2011 at 01:36:56
Specs: Windows 7 64-bit, i7-950 3.06/12Gb
i7-950 3.06Ghz running extremely hot in all situations. Idle ~60C, loaded ~90C. Have CoolerMaster HAF 912 case, Gigabyte X58A-UD3R rev. 2, XtremeGear Water Cooler (120mm), GTX 480 (not over-clocked), 12GB ADATA Triple Channel 1800Mhz RAM, two intake fans, two exhaust (plus GTX 480, so 2.5?). CPU just won't stay cool under any circumstance. Reapplied Arctic Silver 5 tonight, no change. Have seen this thing idle in BIOS at 67.9C. Passed the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool (can post results if needed). I have over-clocking disabled in the BIOS. Don't really know what else to check, other than water cooler (gonna buy a new one tomorrow). I've scoured the net and find others with similar, some exact, setups but no discernible solution at the end of the thread. Anyone with advice?

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#1
November 14, 2011 at 03:51:29
✔ Best Answer
Found this:
http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/forum/f...
so it could be a bad watercooler, but make sure that you plug the water pump into the CPU fan spot and the fan for the radiator into one of the case fan spots and set THIS one in BIOS to manual high setting or use an adapter from a power supply aux/acc plug.

Make sure you applied the thermal compound as per:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_a...

Sometimes too many fans disrupt the air flow through the case, especially side fans, experiment without those and see if there is any change (probably not if your component temps are fine but the CPU is hot).
My gut says that the water cooler is either faulty (low fluid, bad pump, etc.) or not installed correctly since only the CPU is hot and with water, you would expect the opposite.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
November 14, 2011 at 06:47:35
IMO, water cooling is a complete waste of money. Anyhow, it seems to me there are 3 possibilities:

1. the watercooler is defective
2. the watercooling setup is installed incorrectly
3. the temperature reporting is inaccurate

"Reapplied Arctic Silver 5 tonight, no change"

The i7 requires the "vertical line" method. If you did it differently, you did it incorrectly.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/app...


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#3
November 14, 2011 at 10:34:47
Lots of obvious information here, so I assume this is going to be a quick fix. Fingers, I did touch the paste with my finger tip when the credit card was leaving a bare line. Teehee! Taking it to my PC repair where they'll do another re-paste. riider, lots of information online suggests that stock cooling is just not adequate when getting ready to over-clock. Do any facts or recorded tests prove your opinion about water cooling's ineffectiveness? Subsequently, I hope to determine if I need a new water cooler after the re-paste. Thank you two for your input. Will follow up by end of day.

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#4
November 14, 2011 at 20:22:21
I am currently running two Core 2 Duo machines, both are overclocked, both are running stock Intel heat sinks, both are running reasonable temperatures (details below). While more extreme overclocking, especially with quads, may require a more efficient heat sink with a larger fan, but air cooling has been demonstrated to handle overclocking very well. Furthermore, with an air cooled system, you have only 2 parts, the heat sink (in your case probably copper core), and a fan that can be clearly observed to work or not. This makes it more reliable and more obvious if/when something (the fan) stops working. I have nothing against water cooling personally, and for some extreme overclocking it may be needed, but a custom liquid cooled system is what would be called for in that case anyway. For a serious gaming rig it appears you are making, 100% reliability of everything is essential, so an aftermarket air cooled system may be a better choice.
EP43-UD3L
E8200 @3.2GHz
GeForce GTS 250 (mild OC)
4GB Kingston 800DDR2
Stock Intel Heat Sink
Core temps typical 45C Max around 55C
GPU typical 40C Max around 48C
other:
Gigabyte G41 MB (going from memory on specs)
E7500 @ 3.54GHz
GTS 9600 (mild OC) but PCIe only 8x on this board (sadly)
Stock Intel Heat Sink
and temps have always been similar to above and this one is almost always on as the 'family computer'.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
November 14, 2011 at 21:36:01
I see your point, Fingers. After my trip to a buddy we discovered I did not apply the thermal paste correctly. I came back home, did some more research and found that most threads suggested the "pea sized dot in the center" method. I added some fans and reversed my water cooler radiator fans so they now are in-taking cooler ambient air to pass through it. Temps dropped a lot, but still not getting the comfortable high 30s low 40s I've seen reported. Idle is now down in low to mid 40s while full load is hovering mid to high 70s. I did purchase a replacement water cooler, Antec25 Kuhler H20 620, so am going to open it up and try it out. Will report back in an hour or so after running benchmarks. Thanks for the continued interest.

As a side story, one suggested possibility was that my CPUs Metal cap was warped or bowed. Got a second opinion and it shows to be quite normal. /phew


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#6
November 15, 2011 at 01:50:51
Update! 3:44am here and things are running quite cool, although side panels are still removed. Running two instances of my favorite MMORPG and hardware monitor is reporting Min 43C and Max 60C (between all cores), current Value is 43C to 52C (between all cores). What did I do? Replaced the Water Cooler with the Antec25 Kuhler H20 620, and applied thermal paste as per Antec's directions (thanks for the link Fingers). Will let it run overnight and record the Min/Max again. After work, if I wake up and make it there, I will try to run 3DMark11 demo. Hopefully, things are settled. Wish me luck.

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#7
November 15, 2011 at 02:53:30
When it comes to applying thermal paste SMALL dot method outperform other methods.
Artic silver 5 is conductive(it can short circuit components if not applied well) + it's harder to spread. Try Artic cooling mx-4.

@Fingers
Do u know there is very tiny difference between PCIe x8 and x16?
Most video cards can't use the full bandwidth of PCIe x16. If i mess with a power cord i can make my galaxy 9600GT(sadly it's not overclocked) run at PCIe x8 and tried to run mass effect 2 i only loose 1 or 2 fps.


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#8
November 15, 2011 at 21:17:03
@Kuwese
On the G41 board with the 8X PCIe when I run a simple game such as LBreakout (opensource), and a lot of things are going on at the same time (bricks blowing up in a chain reaction, high speed ball, and other things at the same time, the graphics are overloaded for a moment and the paddle will freeze or the ball will go right through the paddle before returning to normal. but on the P43 board with the 16X PCIe and the newer graphics card, it does not do this. If it was a really hot 3D game, I would assume it was the graphics card, but this game should not be able to surpass the ability of the GTs9600 even without the mild overclock and it is even worse with Space Invaders OpenGL. Am I wrong on this? Are these modernized retro games that graphics intensive? I do now play more on my P43/E8200/GTs250 that I built a while back but more recently as MINE rather than the family's in general, so I care less now that when I was originally very frustrated by it. ((Now I would like to build a new one with an i5-2500K, but I have no real reason (justification) right now. Maybe an Ivy Bridge one day....))
Edit: The board really has a PCIe 4x slot, which is why I am getting results this bad. Sorry.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
November 17, 2011 at 09:42:12
Well, core temps are running normal. Fingers, you hit the bulls-eye with this one. Now on to my next issue... T_T

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