Solved How much can I take from it?

June 15, 2015 at 14:09:18
Specs: Windows 7
Hi guys,

I'm trying to overclock my Intel Pentium E5200 on my Asus P2-P5945G (Asus P5L8L-SE motherboard) and I have never done it before.. What can I do to take as much performance out of it as I can? I can't figure what's the maximum FSB of my Motherboard, not in the MOBO, not in the manual, so I really need some help here..
With stock cooler (80mm ≈1000rpm Asus quiet track) my cores go up to 57ºC on Prime95 stress test, so I'm thinking of upgrading it anyways.

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✔ Best Answer
June 18, 2015 at 11:48:07
I'm saying that for "optimal performance", if the CPU frequency is 200MHz, the RAM frequency should be either 200MHz or 400MHz. And don't confuse DDR ratings with the actual frequency. 533MHz (DDR2) RAM runs at 266MHz frequency, 667MHz (DDR2) RAM runs at 333MHz frequency.

If you use either of those RAMs (& assuming no overclocking), the ratio with DDR2-533 would be 200:266 (3:4) & the ratio with DDR2-667 would be 200:333 (3:5). The system will run fine with the "wrong" RAM, it just won't be "optimal"...in other words, the system will take a minor performance hit.

And you cannot damage any hardware by overclocking - not the CPU, not the RAM. If you crank up the settings too high, the computer simply won't boot. Voltage and/or heat can damage components, not over-overclocking.



#1
June 15, 2015 at 20:29:57
Overclocking an OEM computer is almost always a bad idea. They lack just about everything necessary for safe and effective overclocking. Manufacturers awa well aware of this and usually omit the BIOS settings that would be necessary. This saves you from failures and them from the resulting warranty claims.

Overclocking should be confined to home built systems where you control the specifications and quality of the components.


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#2
June 16, 2015 at 05:52:26
Thanks man, really apreciate it.
You might as well have saved from making anything stupid to my PC and I really need it.
Once again, thank you.

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#3
June 16, 2015 at 09:41:58
"With stock cooler (80mm ≈1000rpm Asus quiet track) my cores go up to 57ºC on Prime95 stress test, so I'm thinking of upgrading it anyways"

Your temp under load is fine, not even close to being a problem. No need to waste money on aftermarket cooling.

As for overclocking, your motherboard would have to support overclocking thru the BIOS or you'd have to try overclocking software. The E5200 stock clock speed is 2.5GHz & the clock settings are 12.5 x 200MHz frequency (800MHz FSB). The main issue affecting overall performance is the slow FSB speed. Ideally, you should lower the CPU multiplier & raise the CPU frequency while keeping the overall CPU clock speed within about 20% of stock. Here's some examples:

12.5 x 200MHz = 2500MHz @ 800MHz FSB
9.5 x 266MHz = 2533MHz @ 1066MHz FSB
7.5 x 333MHz = 2500MHz @ 1333MHz FSB
6.5 x 400MHz = 2600MHz @ 1600MHz FSB

You would also need to configure the CPU:RAM frequency ratio to run at either 1:1 or 1:2. Once you get the the FSB & CPU:RAM ratio where you need them to be, you can consider raising the CPU multipler to increase the overall CPU clock speed. Are any of these settings available to you thru the BIOS?


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#4
June 17, 2015 at 05:31:56
On my BIOS settings I have this "JumperFree Configuration" and there I'm able to change de FSB and I have 4 options for RAM clocks, one of them being the Auto one and then 3 options for manual clocks, but I don´t have any option for CPU:RAM ratio.

It seems like I´m not able to change the multiplier as well because I can't access the multiplier settings, so it's probably stuck on 12.5. And that’s it for the settings, the only thing I have more is the “PCIExpress Frequency” wich I have no idea what it does.


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#5
June 17, 2015 at 09:00:51
I managed to find the manual for your system & reviewed the BIOS chapter. Is "AI Overclocking" listed under the JumperFree menu?

http://www.tekwind.co.jp/backup_uc/...

EDIT: very odd looking motherboard: http://interloper.com/graphics/moth...

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#6
June 17, 2015 at 10:28:19
That's the motherboard. That space that's empty wich gives it that "L" shape is where the PSU goes. It's a compact pc so it has everything really tightened up, there's almost 0 space to work on compared to the towers I had before, I almost have to tear it apart just to remove the disk..

There is an AI Overclocking setting wich right now is set to "Standard", once you get it to "Manual" you have access to the "CPU Freaquency" setting and the "DRAM Frequency".

P.S.: This is not an OEM pre-built PC, it basically only came with the chassis, motherboard and a power supply that I had to change later, all the other parts, the CPU, RAM, Disk, OD and Cooling it was all put together by me with some spare parts I had.

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#7
June 17, 2015 at 16:09:58
If the multiplier unlocks when you go to manual then you are all set.
Follow Riider's recommendations and you will be fine.
For the Ratio, you need to understand a little bit more. If you are running FSB1600MHz then you are running a Base Frequency of 400MHz (4 times to get FSB) and your ideal memory speed would be 800MHz DDR2 (base freq. 400MHz, 2 times to get DDR2 number) so the base frequencies are the same or a 1:1 Ratio. On boards with DDR3 memory you would go with 1600MHz DDR3 (base freq. 800MHz) and a ratio of 2:1 (or is that 1:2, I forget which way it goes) which is also correct.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
June 18, 2015 at 07:09:03
Thanks Fingers for the explanation about CPU:RAM ratio, very helpfull.

Unfortunately, even when I change the AI Overclocking setting to manual, it doesn't unlocks me the ratio setting, wich is on the CPU Configuration... I can't access it anywhere else.

Also, bringing the Voltage up is good for what? And how can I have access to it?

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#9
June 18, 2015 at 09:15:53
It can confusing when you start talking frequency vs FSB. I try to stick with frequency to make things easier. The most optimal CPU:RAM frequency ratios are 1:1 & 1:2 for all Intel CPUs prior to the Core-i series. The only exception to that rule is the Pentium 4 series. It was found that due to the inefficiency of the P4 architecture, it would perform better if the RAM frequency was higher than the CPU frequency.

"when I change the AI Overclocking setting to manual, it doesn't unlocks me the ratio setting, wich is on the CPU Configuration"

I believe the CPU Configuration menu is for information only. If there's no multiplier setting in any of the other menus, all you can do is try raising the CPU frequency a little at a time. The 1st thing I suggest is that you get CPU-Z so that you can monitor your settings from Windows:

http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-...

Overclocking isn't an exact science. There's a lot of trial & error involved, so don't get frustrated if you encounter problems along the way. All you'll need to do is use the Clear CMOS jumper to reset the BIOS, then start over again. It's almost impossible to damage the hardware unless you increase the voltage too much. Here's a link to your CPU specs so that you can get a look at the safe voltage range:

http://ark.intel.com/products/37212...

The only time you would need to increase the voltage would be to stabilize the overclock. Make sure to lock down the PCIe at 100MHz & if there are any Spread Spectrum settings, disable them. Then try increasing the CPU frequency from 200MHz to 210MHz. Save the settings & reboot. Your CPU should then run at 2.625GHz. Use CPU-Z to check the CPU speed. Also have a look at the RAM speed, it may increase along with the CPU.

Here's where the voltage increase comes into play. Let's say you tried the CPU frequency at 210MHz, then 215, then 220, & all is well. Then you try 225MHz & the system becomes unstable or unbootable. You would then have the choice of either backing off to 220MHz & calling it quits, or increasing the CPU voltage slightly & trying for 225MHz again. Always increase voltages in small increments & it's generally best to stay within the voltage range supplied by the manufacturer. Also, voltage increases usually raise the CPU temp so keep watch on your temp readings.


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#10
June 18, 2015 at 10:04:48
So what you are saying is that if I have my CPU Frequency at 200MHz, my RAM Frequency should be at 400MHz, since I don´t have any lower, and not at 533MHz or at 667MHz, is it?

Another question, if I raise my CPU Frequency wich will then probably raise my RAM Frequency, is there any possible harm to my RAM sticks?

Even though I have the values in wich the CPU voltage may vary, that unfortunately I can't change, does the MoBo has these voltage values as well (not the same, but some)?

And for final, what is the maximum safe value that you think my CPU will run without crashing or anything having in mind that I can't change voltage?


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#11
June 18, 2015 at 11:48:07
✔ Best Answer
I'm saying that for "optimal performance", if the CPU frequency is 200MHz, the RAM frequency should be either 200MHz or 400MHz. And don't confuse DDR ratings with the actual frequency. 533MHz (DDR2) RAM runs at 266MHz frequency, 667MHz (DDR2) RAM runs at 333MHz frequency.

If you use either of those RAMs (& assuming no overclocking), the ratio with DDR2-533 would be 200:266 (3:4) & the ratio with DDR2-667 would be 200:333 (3:5). The system will run fine with the "wrong" RAM, it just won't be "optimal"...in other words, the system will take a minor performance hit.

And you cannot damage any hardware by overclocking - not the CPU, not the RAM. If you crank up the settings too high, the computer simply won't boot. Voltage and/or heat can damage components, not over-overclocking.


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#12
June 18, 2015 at 11:55:48
Ok man, thanks for your time to explain this newbie how to make things work properly.

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