How can I fix my Dell Precision T3500's overheating problem?

April 3, 2017 at 03:02:31
Specs: Windows 10, Xeon W3503 / 8 gigs
Hello all!

I have recently acquired a used Dell Precision T3500 but have been experiencing overheating problems. In SpeedFan it reads my core temps at 40-50 degrees at idle (i don't know if these are normal temps). After 10 minutes or so it shuts down without warning. After re-booting it displays the message "previous shutdown due to thermal event" and in the bios logs it says cpu/chipset overheated.

So naturally I reapplied thermal paste to the cpu thinking that would have solved the problem but it still shuts down to thermal events. I felt the heatsink on the chipset and it was hot to the touch, so I zip tied a case fan to it and now it's cool but it's still shutting down! So I thought maybe the heatsink wasn't cooling the cpu enough so I added 2 fans on either side of the heatsink but to no avail.

But for some reason when I boot in safe mode, it can run for hours. So I tried a fresh install of Windows 10 but yet again, thermal event.

I have a new cpu coming soon so I'll try that and see if it's the cpu but other than that I have no clue what else I could try, is there anything I might have done wrong or am doing wrong? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Cheers!

Specs:

Intel Xeon W3503 2.40Ghz cpu
Dell 0XPDFK Mobo
Intel X58 chipset
8GBs ddr3 ram
Geforce GTX 750 ti gpu
WD 320GB hdd

I have also tried almost all heating solutions for this particular model I could find on the internet

message edited by Mihaere


See More: How can I fix my Dell Precision T3500s overheating problem?

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#1
April 3, 2017 at 06:49:16
Find your CPU on this list and reread the proper application of thermal compound for your CPU:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_a...
If you apply too much it is as bad as not enough because it becomes an insulator. If you spread it you get air bubbles under the CPU which also acts like an insulator.

Did you clear the CMOS, reset defaults, and then gone back in to make sure all is set correctly for your CPU. Since this is used, someone may have tampered with the settings and your voltages (VCore especially) may be too high.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
April 3, 2017 at 09:43:39
You neglected the power supply specs.

The Xeon W3503 is a 130W CPU so it needs decent cooling & the thermal paste MUST be applied correctly. If you didn't use the "vertical line" method, remove the heatsink, clean off all traces of the old paste, then do it over.

https://cdn2.pcadvisor.co.uk/cmsdat...

http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_a...

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Xeon/...


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#3
April 3, 2017 at 16:11:38
I have already read that and applied the vertical line method. And I just tried clearing the cmos but it still is shutting down. My Xeon W3550 has just been delivered so I'll install it and see what happens from there.

Oh and it's a stock dell 525 watt psu

Update: I've just installed the W3550 and used the vertical line method as per the guide but it is still shutting down. Does anyone have any clue what could be the source of the problem?

message edited by Mihaere


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Related Solutions

#4
April 3, 2017 at 20:51:37
Check the voltages in HWMonitor or in BIOS to make sure that they are within 5% of their nominal values (12V+/- 5%, etc.).

Read and report the Amperage on each of the different voltage rails. I am assuming that you are lacking on your 12Volt rail which powers high draw components like the CPU and Graphics card.

If your voltage is not within the norm, drops off under load, or there is not enough available current to the 12Volt rail, your machine will shut down independent of the heat issue.

As for the overheating.... Please report what cooling your case has. I am now suspecting you have insufficient case cooling in your stock case. Replacing the exhaust fan with a higher CFM model should help if this is the case. Adding a front intake fan if there is a space for it will also help. Going with an aftermarket air cooled heat sink may end up being necessary depending on how much improvement the case cooling helps.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
April 4, 2017 at 03:08:27
I have no idea as to how I should go about doing that so I'll just post the records I saved from HWMonitor.

http://www.docx2doc.com/download-fi...

And I keep my case open and on it's side to let any hot air "float" out of the case. There's 2 120mm intake fans in the front but no outtake fans as I don't see a need for one with how the case positioned. The heatsink is a copper one like:

http://i.imgur.com/iIMqlok.jpg


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#6
April 4, 2017 at 10:01:35
I didn't think the new CPU would make a difference. CPUs work or they don't; there generally is no "in-between".

Running with the side panel off defeats the purpose of having the fans. They need a closed environment to do their job. Move at least one of the 120mm fans to the rear as exhaust & put the side panel back on.

From the article below: "A single rear exhaust fan produces the best results overall. This flushes the theory of more is better right out the door."

http://tech.icrontic.com/articles/p...

Another possibility is the power supply. The Dell 525W isn't necessarily a bad unit, but I believe it has three +12v rail at 18A each rather than a single +12v rail with high amperage. And being that the T3500 is somewhat old (approx 2008), check the motherboard for leaking or bulging capacitors.

http://en.community.dell.com/suppor...

message edited by riider


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#7
April 4, 2017 at 15:26:57
Your heat sink photo doesn't show any CPU fan. Is there a side mounted fan and duct to the CPU area?

As riider has already stated, you shouldn't run with the side panel off. I also agree with riider about the front fans without any rear fan. considering you got this computer used, the parts may have been cobbled together. 130W CPU requires some decent cooling. The current heatsink alone probable isn't enough.

Click on the link below for an example of a heatsink/fan combo. That is a good cooler, if it will fie in your case.

If you haven't already done so, blow out the inside of the case, including the power supply. Blow out using compressed or canned air. Be sure to blow out the power supply from both ends.

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...

message edited by OtheHill


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#8
April 4, 2017 at 20:58:37
Note that I put the single exhaust fan FIRST for a reason because it is the most important one!
A semi-closed system is what you need, cool air coming in LOW in the front, moving over the HOT components picking up heat. Rising as it moves up and back and the hottest air being forced out high up in the rear. This is a smooth flow and is necessary. A good heat sink fan is also important to allow the cooling fins to continue pulling heat out of the mass of the heat sink by moving air purposefully over them.
I remember an old Pentium 4 which is notorious for running hot that I overclocked but was able to keep cool with a single exhaust fan (a slight upgrade from the stock fan).
The only reason I mention front intake fans is for those using big graphics cards and multiple hard drives to force some additional air over them. It does not add any cooling help for the CPU at all, that comes from the CPU heat sink fan and a strong suction from the exhaust fan. Never an open side and Never a side fan.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
April 4, 2017 at 21:50:50
The 120mm are attached to each other so I can't move any but I'll take one of the 80mm fans off the cpu heatsink and use that as an exhaust, put on the side panel and see if that works.

As for the capacitors, I checked all of them and they seemed to be in good condition but 1 or 2 around the cpu socket rose but I just pushed them down and it seems fine.

I did everything in the first paragraph and now I'm not getting thermal events but it is still shutting down with out warning, then stays off for 1-2 seconds then boots up again with no message or anything. At this point I'm thinking of getting a replacement mobo, would this be advised?


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#10
April 5, 2017 at 00:43:37
1 or 2 around the cpu socket rose but I just pushed them down and it seems fine

By this do you mean that they were bulging at the tops or that they had physically risen out of the motherboard? in either case that's not good, all electronic components are extremely sensitive and built for certain tolerances, if the capacitors were bulging then they are no longer functional and therefore cannot provide the CPU with the power it requires when it requires it. They need to be replaced. This is a fairly straight forward process as long as you have

A soldering iron
Good quality solder
Flux
replacement caps
Tweezers

If you are not comfortable doing this then I guess the easiest option would be to replace the mobo, though id recommend giving it a try.


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#11
April 5, 2017 at 05:33:46
So, the heat sink photo you linked was taken after you removed fans? If so, restore BOTH fans and buy a fan for the rear or the case. Install the largest fan you can fit.


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#12
April 5, 2017 at 12:11:55
Yeah I'll give it a go. Know where I can buy capacitors that ship to NZ? If this fails then I'll just get a replacement mobo. Thanks everyone!


The photo was just a reference, the heatsink doesn't come with any fans, I had them zip tied on there. But overheating isn't a problem now.

Get HWMonitor at the link below. Looks like you downloaded something else.

https://hwmonitor.en.softonic.com/


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#13
April 5, 2017 at 16:14:48
In #12 you show the voltages but not the temperatures.
Do NOT remove fan from CPU heat sink.
Put a NEW fan for exhaust at the top rear of the case and as mentioned, the largest that will fit. Case fans are not expensive. Fans on the side do not help remove the heat that is naturally rising in the case so it needs to be rear and near the top.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
April 6, 2017 at 14:44:13
Get HWMonitor at the link below. Looks like you downloaded something else.

https://hwmonitor.en.softonic.com/

I didn't add this.

I have done what you said, Fingers but it's still shutting down. I have also removed the mobo to look at the capacitors but all of them look fine. Someone on another thread I made said it maybe the front I/O panel. They said the front panel has a thermal probe that maybe damaged causing this problem, or the usb inputs maybe be damaged. Would this actually cause the pc to shutdown?

Edit: It seems like every time the cpu is put to hard work it shuts down.

message edited by Mihaere


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#15
April 6, 2017 at 20:45:35
Mihaere

I inadvertently added that. It was suppose to be added to my post. Sorry about that. The reason I posted the link was because you didn't post any voltages so I thought you may not have actually used HWMonitor.


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#16
April 6, 2017 at 20:49:05
No to your last question, it does not make sense.

Your power supply has three 12V rails at 18A each (if really 18A available under load).
Does your GTX750Ti use a 6Pin Aux power connector (some OC'd ones do, some do not, mine does)?
If your graphics card uses a 6pin connector, how is it connected? Does your power supply have a 6pin PCIe connector (doubtful)? Are you using a Y connector that plugs into two 4pin Molex connectors? If using a Y connector to power it, are you plugging it into two Molex connectors on the same power supply wire run? If you are then you MUST change it to be connected to one Molex connector from two DIFFERENT wire runs off the power supply! This is important for two reasons. First, both connectors on one run are assumed to be off the same 12Volt rail and you need to draw current from two separate 12Volt rails to reliably get enough current to the graphics card AND not starve your CPU (if they happen to be on that same 12Volt rail). Second, a cheaper power supplies, typically those with multiple 12Volt internal rails, probably have thinner wire that may not be able to even deliver ALL of the 18Amps on the same pair of wires. Basically using the Y connector on two plugs on one wire run is the same as not connecting the second plug at all.
This seems the most likely scenario at this stage. The best fix is to get a better power supply but the graphics card is not really a high draw card so evening out the load should make a big difference.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#17
April 7, 2017 at 06:38:00
Running HWMonitor and verifying the voltages would go a long way to solving this issue.

The voltages of concern are the +12V, +5V, +3.3V.


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#18
April 7, 2017 at 12:41:55
Run it for a little at idle and then with a game running. Then bring it up and record the min & max voltages.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#19
April 7, 2017 at 15:56:26
No my gpu doesn't require external power, I have the asus strix oc edition. All I have connected to the psu is 1 harddrive, the mobo and the cpu power.

Oh and 3 80mm fans

I'll do those things, thanks Fingers & Othehill

message edited by Mihaere


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#20
April 10, 2017 at 02:31:57
Sorry for the late update, I haven't been home to do those things but here they are:

At idle:
http://i.imgur.com/64vIyaq.png
http://i.imgur.com/PlaEx5F.png

After a game:
http://i.imgur.com/QIjhuSb.png
http://i.imgur.com/0IdmnrX.png


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#21
April 10, 2017 at 07:41:00
Mihaere

I am not sure what you intended to post, but you still have not posted any voltages other than the CPU voltage.

What we need is the 12V, 5V, 3.3V. You can just type those values into your response here.


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#22
April 10, 2017 at 13:43:17
That's all the readings that were in HWMonitor. Could you give me an example of what to post and where to find it?

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#23
April 10, 2017 at 15:30:17
When you open HWMonitor the first listing is Voltages. You need to expand that option by clicking on the + sign to the left of the word Voltage.

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#24
April 13, 2017 at 14:36:34
There is no option to expand voltages, there is no voltages tab.

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#25
April 14, 2017 at 06:28:26
What is the version of HWMonitor that you are using? While HWMonitor is open, click on the Help tab and Then "about HWMonitor". Also, there is a slider on the right edge. You may not be viewing the entire screen.

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#26
April 15, 2017 at 10:05:06
For any type of laptop overheating problem causes because of the fan or motherboard gum is dried. Motherboard gum is one of the most important factors of the overheating problem. Supergeek answered overheating problem. check it out- https://supergeek.com.au/computer-r...

message edited by DustinDeTorres


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#27
April 15, 2017 at 12:44:29
Dustin

What is motherboard gum, never heard of it? Do you mean thermal paste?

Also, this computer is not a laptop.

message edited by OtheHill


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#28
April 16, 2017 at 23:05:25
I'm using version 1.31.0 and no there isn't a slider, the screen is maximized also. The only thing that seems to be giving voltage readings is the gpu.

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#29
April 17, 2017 at 06:19:13
Do you see any labeling of the computer model, or the mainboard make and model listed at the top of HWMonitor?

I guess it is possible the program is not picking up the data.

I don't understand it though. I am running the same version and the very first item listed are the voltages.

Have you checked the voltages and temps in the BIOS?

message edited by OtheHill


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#30
April 17, 2017 at 06:25:08
Try downloading Speccy from the link below. The Motherboard module should show you the voltages.

https://www.piriform.com/speccy


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#31
April 19, 2017 at 02:04:28
The BIOS doesn't have a temp reading section. I downloaded Speccy but I don't see any voltages listed other than the pci/pci-e voltage outputs.

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#32
April 19, 2017 at 04:49:31
In Speccy, expand the motherboard listing. The voltages and the system temperature are listed there.

Under CPU, the core temperatures are listed there.


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#33
April 24, 2017 at 15:19:38
Sorry about the wait but this is all that's in the motherboard section of speccy: http://i.imgur.com/pEFwrVY.png

Cpu: http://i.imgur.com/1Wh0lGK.png

I do get this error when starting the program though:
http://i.imgur.com/jCp9l8P.png


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#34
April 25, 2017 at 05:37:02
Mihaere

Without reviewing the entire thread, can you see voltages in the BIOS (setup) screens?


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#35
April 25, 2017 at 13:23:11
No I can not :/ there's no voltage readings (that I could find) in the bios

message edited by Mihaere


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#36
May 28, 2017 at 13:19:30
You can buy a modified heatsink on ebay that is a Dell original heatsink with a special fan mounted on it. You might get some ideas on how to mod your own heatsink. For details go to ebay and do a search for: T3500 Super Heatsink

message edited by jmsandrsn


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#37
May 28, 2017 at 16:14:14
Please note that the last time the OP posted a reply was over a month ago. It does not appear to matter at this point any longer.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#38
June 29, 2017 at 12:20:26
I have a Dell T3500 and had serious issues until I added a fan to the rear of the heatsink and started using Speedfan to make the fans in the front of the T3500 go faster than 600RPM which is default until your system reaches 80C which is way too hot.

Once you get Speedfan, there is a box in "options" called "Use Dell laptop" ( I know the OP doesn't have a laptop, it's just what the option is called ) click it. You should now have complete control over your fans. I keep mine at 1200 RPM though they will go all the way to 3,000 if you push it to 100%


http://www.almico.com/sfdownload.php

For whatever reason Hardware monitor does not or cannot display voltages with Dell workstations.

I've seen the modified heatsinks for Dells on Ebay, I don't like that it looks as though the builder shaved a good portion of the aluminum fins off to make the fan fit. If you get the right size fan , you can plug it into a molex, tie it on the rear and save money. Mine looks janky but stays cool.

message edited by Rodnoid


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#39
August 25, 2017 at 12:09:37
My father had the same problem ...

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