Solved dram frequency / ram timing / 1:1 ratio

Kingston Hyperx 4gb pc2-8500 ddr2 dimm m...
April 16, 2012 at 19:54:57
Specs: Windows 7 64 service pack 1, Intel core2 quad q9550 /4gb ddr2 pc2-8500
My ram is 1066 MHz and in my bios it always shows 800 MHz, but when I open up CPU-Z it shows my dram at 400 MHz with timings at 5-5-5-18 and the ratio is 5:6. When I change the setting in my bios to get my frequency to 1066 MHz and load up, CPU-Z shows my dram at 533MHz and my timings change to 5-6-6-27 and my ratio is something strange, can't remember the exact numbers. Are my changes making my ram run slower? Should I try to get my ratio as close to 1:1 as I can or should I just leave all my settings at stock and not mess with it? Any help getting my ratio as close as possible would be very much appreciated. Also, my motherboard is a gigabyte p35-s3g.

See More: dram frequency / ram timing / 1:1 ratio

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#1
April 16, 2012 at 22:49:39
Setting the FSB:RAM ratio to 1:1 would set the memory frequency to 1333MHz, which might result in system instability because you would overclock the memory.

I think you should leave your memory at 1066MHz (533MHz in CPUz), which is the default frequency for your memory.

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#2
April 17, 2012 at 05:00:43
✔ Best Answer
Ratio is based on frequency. Don't confuse frequency with the bogus QDR/DDR ratings. Your Q9550 runs at 1333MHz FSB which is 333MHz frequency. For a 1:1 ratio, the RAM should also run at 333MHz frequency (667MHz DDR). An even better ratio for a Core 2 system is 1:2, but you would need DDR2-1333 for that. Anything else is less than optimal but the performance hit will be minimal.

You said CPUZ is showing a ratio of 5:6. That's with the CPU at 333MHz (1333MHz FSB) & the RAM at 400MHz (800MHz DDR). In other words, 333:400 which reduces to 5:6.


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#3
April 17, 2012 at 16:06:47
ok when I set my system memory multiplier in my bios to auto it shows my ram frequency as 800MHz and CPU-Z reports my dram at 400MHz with a 5:6 ratio and my memory timings at 5-5-5-18, but when I change my system memory multiplier to 3.2 it shows my ram freq at 1066MHz and CPU-Z reports my dram at 533 with a ratio of 5:8 and timings at 5-7-7-24. I'm not sure if my bios is lowering my memory by default for some reason and I'm actually overclocking by changing my memory multiplier to 3.2 to get it up to 1066MHz. ultimately I guess what I'm asking is which setting is faster?

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#4
April 17, 2012 at 16:17:23
I apologize for the long winded question and I know I'm probably splitting hairs as far as performance goes, I just want to make the best with what I've got.

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#5
April 17, 2012 at 18:16:31
"when I change my system memory multiplier to 3.2 it shows my ram freq at 1066MHz and CPU-Z reports my dram at 533 with a ratio of 5:8"

Don't confuse the DDR rating with frequency. Your RAM does NOT run at 1066MHz frequency, it runs at 533MHz frequency. 1066MHz is the double data rate, which is frequency x2.

Obviously 5:6 and 5:8 aren't 1:1. You need to change the memory multipler to 2.0 to get the RAM to run at 333MHz. Or better yet, crank up your CPU frequency to 400MHz (1600MHz FSB) & run the RAM in sync at 400MHz (800MHz DDR).


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#6
April 17, 2012 at 18:30:37
I'm sorry I didn't mean to say frequency. My motherboard is....I guess stubborn might be the word, and it won't let me raise my cpu frequency past 338. at 339 and up it does an auto restart with default settings. I think I may just have one of those motherboards that won't allow a higher overclock. I wish I was smarter with this kind of stuff so I could play around with it more and make it OC higher. I changed my memory multiplier to 2.0 and I'm gonna try that for awhile and see how it works. thank you both very much for your input. I really appreciate your time.

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#7
April 17, 2012 at 19:47:35
You need to fix your PCIe at 100MHz.
You need to disable Spread Spectrum, Speed Step, and C-States.
You probably need to raise your Vcore voltage a notch or two.
Try backing down on the CPU multiplier a little temporarily so you can set your Frequency at 400MHz and memory multiplier at 2.0 and make sure everything else is running stable. Then raise the CPU multiplier one step at a time until you have trouble, then raise the Vcore voltage one or two small steps at a time until you are stable. Make sure you are monitoring your temperatures at the same time to keep you out of trouble. Your Vcore range is 0.85V - 1.3625V so stay within that range and as low as is stable.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
April 22, 2012 at 16:32:09
I changed my PCIe to 100MHz but I've never heard of spread spectrum, speed step or c-states. I did try lowering my CPU multiplier a few times with different settings and I just never have been able to find that set of magic numbers. I've tried both leaving my Vcore voltage on auto and doing it manually and can never get it to boot. I've read on various sites that the bios for this motherboard is very temperamental in most of the bios versions except for a specific release (the exact one escapes me). I think I'm just going to buy a motherboard that's made for overclocking or at least one that makes it much easier.

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#9
April 22, 2012 at 20:00:04
On this post: http://www.computing.net/answers/cp... There was a similar issue and it was explained for one of the older Gigabyte motherboards, especially the text I copied from their manual in #10 that might help you understand.
If you DO end up going with a new motherboard, I like the quality and value on the Gigabyte boards, the P43 I have overclocks well. Just keep in mind that this is still a few generations behind the newest technology so avoid spending too much in it since you will probably be itching for a newer machine/build before long.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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