Solved CPU overheating despite new thermal paste, fan etc

January 15, 2016 at 10:00:00
Specs: Windows 10, AMD Athlon 64x2 / 4gb RAM
Hi all,

In my old age I'm spending some time messing around with all the various computer components we had lying around the house. I've come across a bit of a problem though.

A few weeks ago I popped an AMD Athlon 64 x2 6000+ 3100mhz CPU into a Geforce6100sm-M V1 motherboard. It replaced a CPU that was 5000+ 2600mhz.

Since that point the CPU has never been lower than 57 degrees and quickly gets hotter. The PC switches itself off within about 10 minutes, less if it's under any kind of load. I reapplied thermal paste (Arctic Silver) according to the instructions but it's only giving me an extra 10 minutes or so before I get the same cut out. The fan seems to be running without any issue and is free of dust etc.

Can anybody provide any advice on how to stabilise performance, bar simply going back to the old CPU? In a previous post I noticed a helpful user pointed out that the new CPU required 89w of power rather than 65w. However, I'm not clear on how to change this (if I need to) or whether there are other settings in the BIOS that need manual intervention.

I've been into the BIOS but any settings related to voltage all appear to be greyed out with no option for me to take manual ownership and change them.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts/comments.


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✔ Best Answer
January 16, 2016 at 06:16:13
Personally, I would have just kept the 5000+ & overclocked it. They can generally handle up to 3.2GHz without too much fuss.

Anyhow, the only possible cause of overheating is inadequate cooling. 57C is awfully warm for a CPU at idle so either the paste is applied wrong, the heatsink is installed incorrectly (not properly seated & fully locked in place), or you used a 65W rated heatsink on a 89W CPU. But even if you used the wrong heatsink, I wouldn't think it would cause the CPU to shutdown, but it would run hotter than normal.

Some heatsink locking levers need quite a bit of force to lock them in place. Make sure you're pushing it all the way down.

http://www.pcstats.com/articleimage...

http://www.pcstats.com/articleimage...



#1
January 15, 2016 at 10:41:23
Is your BIOS the latest level?

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#2
January 15, 2016 at 11:12:06
Hi ijack,

It is - but it's still pretty ancient, it dates back to 2008. If there's a newer version than what I've got I'm afraid I can't find it.


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#3
January 15, 2016 at 13:06:46
Most likely you applied the thermal paste incorrectly. All AMD A64 CPUs (& newer) use the middle dot method. Do NOT spread the paste, it will spread by itself when you lock the heatsink in place.

Here's a pic: http://blog.corsair.com/wp-content/...


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Related Solutions

#4
January 16, 2016 at 00:54:33
Thanks riider. I can confirm that it's not a thermal paste issue as the paste is newly applied in the way you mention. Could it be related to too much/too little power? And if so, is there any way to adjust it?

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#5
January 16, 2016 at 06:16:13
✔ Best Answer
Personally, I would have just kept the 5000+ & overclocked it. They can generally handle up to 3.2GHz without too much fuss.

Anyhow, the only possible cause of overheating is inadequate cooling. 57C is awfully warm for a CPU at idle so either the paste is applied wrong, the heatsink is installed incorrectly (not properly seated & fully locked in place), or you used a 65W rated heatsink on a 89W CPU. But even if you used the wrong heatsink, I wouldn't think it would cause the CPU to shutdown, but it would run hotter than normal.

Some heatsink locking levers need quite a bit of force to lock them in place. Make sure you're pushing it all the way down.

http://www.pcstats.com/articleimage...

http://www.pcstats.com/articleimage...


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#6
January 17, 2016 at 05:34:27
Agreed, if you are using the original heat sink from the older CPU then replace it with a higher thermal model. Make sure that you clean off old thermal compound properly without scratching the surfaces, do not handle surfaces after cleaning (oil on your fingers), and make sure that you do not apply too much compound.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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