Solved Computer Randomly Shutting Off - Possible Internal Damage?

April 30, 2016 at 11:42:28
Specs: Windows 8.1, AMD FX-6300 6-Core
A few weeks ago my PC started shutting off completely when a game client (Battlefront, Payday 2, etc) was running for about 30 minutes. Whenever I turned it back on, it gave me an 'Over Temperature Error' that was near 190 degrees Celsius. Once this became a regular thing, I checked all the fans to see if there was a blockage. Turns out I had a fan on the bottom of the chassis that was almost completely blocked with fuzz and dust. I cleaned it out, hoping the temperature errors would stop. They did, in a sense; the PC still shuts off when running certain clients, except I no longer get a temperature error.

Did I somehow damage an internal component from the overheating? Or is it possible temperature is still an issue?


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April 30, 2016 at 17:56:27
"I've never actually opened up the chassis in the 1.5 years I've had it"

Wow, I blow mine out at least twice a year. Do as Fingers suggested - give it a good thorough cleaning & add a hardware monitoring program - & it should be fine.

I checked your power supply specs. It's not a bad unit but it lacks several features that we normally recommend - it has dual +12v rails, it lacks active PFC (power factor correction), & it's only 72% efficient. We generally suggest units that have a single +12v rail, active PFC, & are rated 80% plus efficient. There's no need to replace the PSU unless it's gone bad, but you could have done better.

http://thermaltakeusa.com/products-...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

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#1
April 30, 2016 at 12:46:47
There's no way ANY component in your computer reached 190C (374F) so obviously your temp readings are out of whack.

You should be more specific about which fan was loaded with "fuzz & dust". Some cooling fans are extremely important (CPU, motherboard chipset, graphics card, power supply) & others not so much (case intake & exhaust fans). Being that you said the fan was at the bottom, I suspect it was the power supply. How did you go about removing the blockage?

What I do with mine is unplug all the cables & take the tower out to my garage. I then remove the side panels & give the insides a good blasting with my air compressor nozzle. If you don't have a compressor, invest in a can or two of compressed air. You may have to use a small soft brush to loosen the crud that's stuck to the fan blades. Whatever you do, do NOT use a vacuum because it can cause a electro-static discharge that can fry electronics.

Another possibility is that your power supply that can no longer handle the load. It's difficult to say because you didn't post any detailed specs.

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#2
April 30, 2016 at 13:44:52
Right, so about that vacuum...I did use that. I haven't noticed any frying though, so I guess that's...good enough? Anyway, I've never actually opened up the chassis in the 1.5 years I've had it, so the only cleansing going on has been external.

I know that the affected fan was in fact the power supply fan. As for the power supply itself, it puts out 500w, which may or may not be enough. However, I wouldn't know why the power supply suddenly wouldn't be able to keep up with the load, so I'm assuming either the fans need a more thorough cleaning, or the blockage somehow damaged the power supply.

I attempted to put together a list of parts I currently have, but the 'AMD Radeon r9 200 Series' gpu didn't show up anywhere, so it isn't included.
https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/user/Fe...


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#3
April 30, 2016 at 17:30:34
If you did not open the case and only used the vacuum from the outside then you are probably OK from the static discharge since it is probably a metal case.
If you did not do an open case cleaning then you are not done yet by far. Take it outside, to the garage, to the mud room, etc. and open the case. Use a can of compressed air you can purchase from a computer store or office supply store and blow out all of the dust. Clean both ends of the power supply, all fans, corners, heat sinks (do not remove any), etc.
Boot it back up again and install HWMonitor (free) so you can check all of the different temperature readings.
Please note that I have seen power supplies (not often) that barely worked when dust clogged but died completely after blowing out the dust. Usually though they come through the cleaning just fine and work as designed for a good while after.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#4
April 30, 2016 at 17:56:27
✔ Best Answer
"I've never actually opened up the chassis in the 1.5 years I've had it"

Wow, I blow mine out at least twice a year. Do as Fingers suggested - give it a good thorough cleaning & add a hardware monitoring program - & it should be fine.

I checked your power supply specs. It's not a bad unit but it lacks several features that we normally recommend - it has dual +12v rails, it lacks active PFC (power factor correction), & it's only 72% efficient. We generally suggest units that have a single +12v rail, active PFC, & are rated 80% plus efficient. There's no need to replace the PSU unless it's gone bad, but you could have done better.

http://thermaltakeusa.com/products-...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

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