Solved Acer Aspire X1200 Motherboard Fan Overclocking

December 19, 2013 at 05:07:57
Specs: Windows
This is the weirdest repair of a PC I've ever experienced. The CPU fan is running on warp speed upon power on and no boot up posting. I replaced the CPU fan with a similar one to see if it was just the fan and then replaced the battery to ensure the bios is alive. The fan ran better but high, but still will not boot up at all (giving no kind of posting). I then booted the system without the CPU fan plugged in and sure enough, it fully posted to operating system. Of course the system is not fixed because the CPU is in jeopardy, so what's the resolve before retorting to replacing motherboard.

See More: Acer Aspire X1200 Motherboard Fan Overclocking

Report •

✔ Best Answer
December 22, 2013 at 15:42:22
It could be a bad power supply.
Note that a CPU fan should be the 4pin variety, not the 3pin type so the BIOS can reed the fan speed and control it.
It could be something unrelated entirely. Many motherboards spin up the fan to full speed when starting and during shut down. If you have another boot issue, it could be just that and not a hardware issue at all.
Try booting into BIOS set up. If that works and does not have any problems with that for a few minutes while watching the reported temperatures, shut down. Then try booting to a bootable CD made with Memtest86 on it and run through all tests. If the memory tests good, it is not that. Exit.
Try booting to a bootable CD with Seatools from Seagate and run the short hard drive test. If this is good, it is not that.
Try a Windows Start Up Repair from an install disk, repair disk, or recovery disk to see if that works. If Windows boots, the fan speed should return to normal.
Report back results and more details for more help.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers



#1
December 19, 2013 at 08:26:32
You already answered your own question - you took out the CPU fan and the system started up fine, so you have to replace the CPU fan.

Not to sound too much like a nag or anything, but this kind of stuff is exactly why you should never overclock your system. It places the health of the internal parts in jeopardy - and considering that you might fry your motherboard, you have to ask yourself if slightly faster processing speeds are worth the risk of constantly having to replace parts.

I would recommend you learn from this experience and get yourself a gaming PC (gaming is usually the only activity that requires overclocking of your PC) - most manufacturers caught on to the fact that PCs were being overclocked for better gaming performance and have put parts in their systems that make overclocking unnecessary.


Report •

#2
December 19, 2013 at 09:51:43
I totally disagree with techninja. There's absolutely nothing wrong with overclocking provided you do it wisely. Generally, if you overclock too much, the only "bad" things that will happen is either the system will become unstable or it simply won't boot, in which case all you'd have to do is dial down the overclock settings. Modern CPUs have built-in thermal protection so it's virtually impossible to overheat one to death. There's very little risk of hardware damage unless you start jacking up the voltage settings.

I'm curious how you managed to overclock an Acer board in the 1st place? The majority of OEM boards come with a BIOS that's so crippled that the only way to overclock is via software.

As for the issue with the fan, did you replace only the fan or did you replace the heatsink as well? If you removed/replaced the heatsink, did you remove all traces of the old thermal material & apply a fresh dab of paste according the the directions for your particular CPU? If it's an AMD CPU, you should have put a tiny dab in the center of the CPU, then set the heatsink on top of it & locked it down. The dab should be approx the size of a grain of rice, the size of a bean is too much. If you used none at all, too much, or spread it on like frosting a cake, that could be the problem. Also, make sure you're plugging the fan into the proper header on the motherboard & that the fan plug has the correct number of pins. Some boards have an RPM sensor; if no fan movement is detected, the board will not boot.

One last thing, the board does not need a CMOS battery to work. The only reason the battery is required is to retain the BIOS settings in the CMOS chip when the power cord is unplugged. A board will work perfectly fine with a dead battery or no battery at all, but the date/time & other BIOS settings would have to be reconfigured after every shutdown.


Report •

#3
December 19, 2013 at 18:09:00
Thanks for the replies as over clocking was the wrong subject line for my problem. I thought the problem was a fan configuration issue in the bios which I thought a new battery would help sustain the default setting. Unfortunately, when the CPU fan is plugged into the board, I get no boot up activity (NOTHING) except that there is adequate power to run it's own fan and the cpu fan which runs at a very high speed. This is why I thought there was some over clocking going on or smart fan misconfigurations.

It's odd that even with a replacement fan, the problem still exist. The other thing to consider and most important is that the post/boot up appears after disconnecting the CPU fan from the motherboard. This computer is not used for gaming nor reconfigured, as the system owner wouldn't know how anyway. Thanks!


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 22, 2013 at 10:26:46
Maybe your PSU isn't supplying the mobo with enough voltage/current? Or maybe the current and replacement fans are oversized for the fan controller.

I'd also check the voltage rails to see if a wire is loose; unlikely but possible.
I don't know, that's the only thing I can come up with.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq

message edited by OLDISGOOD


Report •

#5
December 22, 2013 at 15:42:22
✔ Best Answer
It could be a bad power supply.
Note that a CPU fan should be the 4pin variety, not the 3pin type so the BIOS can reed the fan speed and control it.
It could be something unrelated entirely. Many motherboards spin up the fan to full speed when starting and during shut down. If you have another boot issue, it could be just that and not a hardware issue at all.
Try booting into BIOS set up. If that works and does not have any problems with that for a few minutes while watching the reported temperatures, shut down. Then try booting to a bootable CD made with Memtest86 on it and run through all tests. If the memory tests good, it is not that. Exit.
Try booting to a bootable CD with Seatools from Seagate and run the short hard drive test. If this is good, it is not that.
Try a Windows Start Up Repair from an install disk, repair disk, or recovery disk to see if that works. If Windows boots, the fan speed should return to normal.
Report back results and more details for more help.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


Report •

Ask Question