Solved Best device for recording console video games?

June 19, 2013 at 21:53:42
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit, Intel Core i3 @ 3.10GHz | 8GB DDR3 1333MHz
Hello,

I'm looking for a device that will allow me to play console video games on my TV while simultaneously recording the footage to my computer. It doesn't necessarily have to be capable of HD video recording, as the absolute newest consoles I will be recording gameplay from will be non-HD compatible sixth-generation consoles. (PlayStation 2, GameCube.) Most of the video games I will be recording will be Super Nintendo games and PlayStation 1 games. I don't mind if it is an internal card, or is an external device, providing it works well and is reliable.

On another note, I would like to also record a separate audio source (one or two microphones). I assume I will have to do separate to the video recording; in a different program and splice together the voice audio with the video and its own audio.

Taking this into account, what would be the ideal video capture device for my needs? Please keep in mind that I still require the picture to be on my television during recording. Also, every consoles I wish to record gameplay from will be connected using standard composite AV cables.

Thank you in advance!

Comguy

MSI B75MA-P45 Motherboard
Intel Core i3 3.10GHz
8GB DDR3 1333MHz RAM
SAPPHIRE ATI Radeon 5770 Vapor-X
AMD HD Audio
2TB Hitachi HDD (Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit)
LG DVD-RW SATA


See More: Best device for recording console video games?

Report •

#1
June 21, 2013 at 07:50:40
✔ Best Answer
You'll be looking for capture devices with low latency; the lower the better. I was going to suggest Gamebridge, but apparently it's not supported anymore and it doesn't work well with x64 OSes. Alternatively, you could just get your hands on some RCA splitters, and feed the signal to both the PC and the TV. Then you'd be able to get a capture device without worrying about latency. Just make sure said device is able to handle your most visually complex game before committing.

I personally use a Hauppauge HVR-1800. The card has a built in MPEG2 compressor, so capture isn't CPU bound, and the I/O load is heavily reduced (60 min of NTSC = 655 MB). It's discontinued (replaced by the HVR-1850), and its latency is measured in seconds so the split output approach is required. Hauppauge apparently makes gaming focused capture hardware now, which appears to be a modern Gamebridge.

For SNES and the PSX, you'll want to use emulation with either Camtasia or Fraps.

For the SNES, the typical recommendations are ZSNES or SNES9x. Both were "completed" years ago, and mostly differ in their UI's; ZSNES started out as a DOS program, so its UI is peculiar. Pick whichever you like. I know Camtasia works on both. ROMs (the games) are sort of a gray area; they were (and mostly still are) not sold anymore and largely considered abandoned by their companies. Then Nintendo learned how valuable nostalgia is and they started selling 20 year old games.

The PSX has a few emulators. I use PSXe, but the configuration is a pain and I never got the emulation to 100%. Still, any emulator out there should be able to read your PSX disks from your PC's CD-ROM, if you still have them.

You might also want to check out the TAS community. They have their own set of emulators to facilitate what they do, including doing their own video encoding.

About Camtasia vs FRAPS: I know Camtasia works with more things, while FRAPS tends to give better results when it does work. Either program should allow you to expand into PC gaming with minimal hassle. And then you can put out yet another VVVVVV video.

On audio support, you'll want to get USB microphones, as each are their own sound device. You should be able to record as many channels as you can support running instances of Aduacity.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#2
June 21, 2013 at 10:23:27
@Razor2.3

Thank you for the suggestions. I realize it would be easier to use an emulator for the SNES and PSX recording, however, I still wish to play the game on the console itself, on my television while recording. I'll look into the capture cards you suggested and invest in a composite splitter.

Thanks,

Comguy

Note:

What about something like this?

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Produc...

MSI B75MA-P45 Motherboard
Intel Core i3 3.10GHz
8GB DDR3 1333MHz RAM
SAPPHIRE ATI Radeon 5770 Vapor-X
AMD HD Audio
2TB Hitachi HDD (Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit)
LG DVD-RW SATA


Report •

#3
June 21, 2013 at 13:54:43
It looks like a standard USB capture device, you might have issues with visually complex games or during extended sessions. I don't know if it has x64 drivers.

Then again, if it doesn't pan out you're only out $20. All told, I'd try it.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •
Related Solutions


Ask Question