Want non-annoying image viewer

March 23, 2016 at 12:17:23
Specs: Linux
My Android 4.4.2 tablet came with an image viewer named 'Gallery'
version 1.1.40030. It does several things that an image viewer does
not need to do, and should not do. Most annoyingly, the moment I
open the app, it displays the most recent image in every folder on
the tablet. I cannot hide images by putting them inside folders.
So unless I also save something innocuous as the last image every
time I save an image, I can get some really nasty surprises when I
open the viewer.

In addition, it has unwanted permissions including:

- Take pictures and videos
- Record audio
- Location
- Add or remove accounts
- Control near field communication
- Full network access
- View network connections
- Read sync settings
- Toggle sync on and off

Can you suggest a good image viewer that doesn't do these things?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#1
March 23, 2016 at 17:31:05
IrfanView is a bit traditional but it is a good viewer and it doesn't do that sort of thing:

message edited by Derek


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#2
March 24, 2016 at 01:37:10
I think you missed or forgot that I asked this in the Android forum,
and specified that my tablet runs Android. I don't see any indication
that Irfan Skiljan has made a version of IrfanView for Android.

I've used IrfanView on Windows 95, 98, 98 SE, ME, and 7.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#3
March 24, 2016 at 05:48:44
OK, I've struck it out.

message edited by Derek


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Related Solutions

#4
March 25, 2016 at 14:26:57
Somebody has a suggestion, don't you? How could you not???

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis



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#5
March 25, 2016 at 15:37:56
Almost all Android apps (even the paid ones) ask for some, all or even more of the permissions you mention above. If the stock viewer isn't satisfactory, you can still generally "hide" a folder by putting a period in front of the folder name. The phone/tablet will then consider it a system file/folder and disallow privileges---i.e. the only way you'd find it would be to browse it on your computer when connected. Given the nature of things involving security, I'd strongly consider removing whatever you don't want someone to see. I worked at a place that refurbished cell phones some years ago ('09-'10) and even when you delete files, they're still able to be retrieved.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#6
March 26, 2016 at 08:21:31
Isn't it likely that a computer programmer with a mindset similar
to mine would have written an image viewer without the annoying
unneeded and unwanted functions? It would be easier to write
than an image viewer which includes them. It would be smaller.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#7
March 26, 2016 at 13:51:07
"...without the annoying unneeded and unwanted functions?"

But that would make it safe and ad-free. Neither of which the cell-phone service providers nor Google really wants...

You didn't think those free apps were "really free", did you?....

Closest thing to meeting your requirements about hiding files is QuickPic (Google it). Small in size but still requests several permissions. Also developed by a Chinese-based company (draw your own conclusions there)...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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#8
March 26, 2016 at 15:51:29
Another thing to look out for is apps that state they can change app permissions with updates.

This might interest you Jeff:
http://thehackernews.com/2015/06/an...

App Ops however does require that the Android device is rooted.


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#9
May 2, 2016 at 15:32:14
A bit over a month has gone by, but I'm continuing with this...

When I go to the Google Play Store and search for "App Ops",
I get several programs with almost identical names. Are some
of them fakes? Which one can I trust? Are they all okay, and
any one of them will work? Or what?

Also, since I'm using a tablet, not a phone, can I presume that
I don't need to be concerned with the device being rooted?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#10
May 4, 2016 at 06:29:02
This is the app the article links to:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/...
The author is nowsky.

It appears that if you are running Android 5.0 or later you don't need to root the device to install and use it.

Caution is always paramount when rooting an Android device (or jailbreaking an Apple device) because it allows you to circumvent security measures to install software you normally are unable to. It doesn't matter if it is a tablet or phone. Most unauthorized apps are fine but there are a lot of rogues out there also. I always read user reviews and research anything I wish to install.


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#11
May 4, 2016 at 12:26:39
This is going off on a tangent from a tangent off the original question,
but can you explain further about the need to root the device? It seems
to me that since my tablet is not also a phone, rooting isn't relevant, so
doesn't need to be done in this case.

Also, what are the limitations on installing software that you refer to
(which are circumvented by rooting), and why do you consider them to
be good or useful?

Thank you!

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#12
May 5, 2016 at 08:25:03
Hi Jeff,

Yeah we are straying from your original post.

As T-R-A alluded to, when something is free (or in some cases even paid for), you are the product. Your information is valuable and that usually is the cost associated with free apps by way of collection and distribution of personal data.

I posted my response to help you secure your personal data if you wished to do so. In the same way ad blockers can prevent unwanted data coming in there is software that can prevent data going out.

If you are using Android Lollipop or Marshmallow "App Ops" is supported so rooting th device becomes a moot point.

What App Ops does is allow you to toggle permissions to apps that you don't believe need access to certain areas of your OS. You get to define the rules. For example if you download a notepad app you probably don't want it to have access to your microphone, contacts list and browser history....


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#13
May 5, 2016 at 09:53:12
The first question was asking about the technical need to root my
device. My vague impression was that since this is a tablet, not a
phone, and therefore isn't controlled by a phone company, it wouldn't
need to be "rooted" in order to do the things a rooted device can do.
But having the last name "Root" doesn't give me any expertise over
what rooting actually is. I may have misinterpreted a bad explanation.
If it means being able to access the device's root directory, then
apparently I do need to root it. I don't find an operating system when
I look in the tablet's "Android" folder. There has to be much more,
hidden away.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#14
May 8, 2016 at 04:20:33
The technical need to root your phone is different for people depending on objectives. If your device is running a later version of Android the technical need is non-existent. If your device is running an earlier version of Android the technical need would be to sideload the app to circumvent the restrictions in place preventing you from installing the software by normal means.

The reasons I have rooted in the past and jailbreak my iPhones and tablets is to customize the UI. I also am able to load music onto my devices without the need for iTunes or to be hooked up to a PC. I free up the Bluetooth restrictions in iOS devices to allow me to transfer any file type I would like between devices. There are many more reasons one would wish to root or jailbreak their devices so I will link you to the page below so you can have a read. Jailbreaking isn't solely to work around network restrictions although it can be a part of why people want to do this:

http://gizmodo.com/5982287/reasons-...

Sorry I didn't intent for your topic to stray of path so I hope this helps you understand why my suggestion earlier was relevant.

message edited by btk1w1


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#15
May 8, 2016 at 06:45:36
I didn't mean to complain that you or anyone else was taking
the thread off topic. It was more that I was apologizing for doing
it myself...

> If your device is running an earlier version of Android the technical
> need would be to sideload the app to circumvent the restrictions in
> place preventing you from installing the software by normal means.

I'm curious about these restrictions. My tablet runs Android 4.4.2
and has not been rooted. But all the apps I currently have installed
were via .apk files I downloaded, not Google Play Store.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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