Solved Can default apps be removed?

Toshiba Satellite c655-s5082 laptop
February 13, 2014 at 11:33:36
Specs: Windows 7, AMD 4 GB
My 3-year-old Samsung smartphone GT-S5570 with Android 2.3.6. is becoming slow and it should be helpful to remove apps I never need but which are factory installed, with no option for removal (such as news, voice search, and many others). Is there a way to do that?

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#1
February 13, 2014 at 23:31:57
✔ Best Answer
Only by "rooting" the phone, which involves installing a modified, unofficial version of Android. You have to use Google Search to find out more. I've never done it because I don't want to ruin my phone - - too risky.

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#2
February 14, 2014 at 09:44:27
Thank you. My Google Search found that CNET recommends Kingo Android Root. If I had a recent, expensive phone, I would avoid taking risks. But in my case I believe having a try makes sense, considering that the product is backed by a known company (CNET). Before I had no information at all on this topic. Your short message enabled me to know exactly where we stand. All the best.

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#3
February 14, 2014 at 09:52:17
"...considering that the product is backed by a known company (CNET)"

I would hardly believe that CNET would provide any positive response, should you end up borking your phone. They have long been known to be providing spyware in their downloads:

http://www.billhartzer.com/pages/cn...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#4
February 22, 2014 at 01:02:42
How right you are! I tried the procedures found in both the CNET article and the Tom's Guide for rooting one's phone (How and Why to Root your Android: 15 Worthwhile Apps). With the first (advising Kingo Android Root), my phone model was correctly identified but soon the process stalled. With the second (advising SuperOneClick), the very moment I downloaded the software my AVG antivirus signalled that ir had two Trojans in it. Worse happened when I tried to retrieve Silent App Unistaller which, according to Tom's guide, would enable disposing of factory-installed bloatware. Suddenly my FireFox behaved in a strage way, insisting that I show be interviewed about how it performs. And pop-ups kept springing everywhere every few minutes reproaching me for not giving the green light to all sorts of good things they meant to do to my computer. Possibly, some months ago, when the CNET and Tom's Guide authors tried out those programs,things were fine. But now it would be foolish even to touch them with pole.

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