XP autoupdate then C0000221 error

ImwithStoopid February 12, 2009 at 08:55:27
Specs: Windows XP
Mother in law's laptop did an auto update yesterday, restarted, then she received a STOP C0000221 currupt image url.dll.

Googled, and attempted what I found on the internet to no avail. She could not find her XP cd from Dell, so I used my old XP SP1 cd to use Recovery console. Tried to copy the file url.dll from there, but it could not be expanded...so I deleted the url.dll from her C:\windows\system32....did a reboot to "last known good configuration" and it worked.

Just thought Id share, most of these errors I found from other people encountered were from installing other software...I couldn't find anyone who was given this error after an Auto Update on 2-12-09


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#1
February 12, 2009 at 11:31:43
Thanks for letting us know what you did to fix it. To bad more people don't realize the impact of doing it!

Have a great day!

Change Is Good
http://www.citizenlink.org/Stopligh...


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#2
February 12, 2009 at 13:21:13
"Tried to copy the file url.dll from there, but it could not be expanded"

There's at least two ways of doing that.

The compressed (unexpanded) files on the Windows CD have an underline character at the end of the file extension instead of a letter or number.

The Copy command in the Recovery Console in XP (and 2000, and in server 2003) automatically uncompresses (expands) a compressed (unexpanded) file from the Windows CD, such that it's the full size at the destination, but it doesn't rename it's extension at the destination, so you must specify that.

E.g. if your CD drive letter you have the Windows CD in is H, use

copy h:\i386\url.dl_ C:\Windows\System32\url.dll

(all on one line, a space between copy and h:\..., and between .dl_ and C:\Windows.....)

You can also use the Expand command - it automatically expands (uncompresses) the file AND renames it so it's the proper size and proper extension at the destination.

E.g. if your CD drive letter you have the Windows CD in is is H, use

expand h:\i386\url.dl_ C:\Windows\System32

or better still

expand h:\i386\url.dl_ C:\Windows\System32\

(all on one line, a space between expand and h:\..., and between .dl_ and C:\Windows.....)

......

Apparently, you are resticted in the Recovery Console as to what drives, and what folders on the Windows installation you are logged onto, you can access, and where you can copy files from/to, unless you change Group Policy settings in Windows before you enter the Recovery Console, and then use the SET command in the Recovery Console to change default settings (SET is disabled in the Recovery Console otherwise, other than it shows you the present settings).
e.g. You can access any CD or DVD drive letter or folders or subfolders on it; the root folder, the Cmdcons folder, and the %system% (Windows) folder and all it's subfolders of the Windows installation you are logged onto, but not other folders on the Windows installation you are logged onto.
So - you can copy (or expand) files from a CD in an optical drive to the root folder, the Cmdcons folder, and to the system (Windows) folder or any of it's subfolders, of the Windows installation you are logged onto, but you can't copy files to a floppy in a floppy drive or to OTHER THAN than the the root folder, the Cmdcons folder, and the system (Windows) folder and any of it's subfolders, of the Windows installation you are logged onto.

See this for more info:
http://www.petri.co.il/recovery_con...

......

The auto update should not have corrupted url.dll.

Something else may be wrong.
.....

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

For a laptop, you must remove both its main battery and AC adapter before you do that.
......

If you do a ram test, do that AFTER having tried cleaning the contacts and making sure the ram is seated properly - otherwise any errors found may be FALSE.
If the ram is incompatible with the chipset, it will likely FAIL a ram test - that is NOT a true indication of the ram being faulty - there is probably nothing wrong with it, and it will pass the test if installed in a mboard it is compatible with.
If a ram test DOES find errors, if you have more than one module installed, try the test with one module at a time - sometimes they won't work properly when more than one is installed, but it will pass when by itself.
...

If you want to try a memory diagnostic utility that takes a lot less time to run a full pass than memtest86 does, this one is pretty good - Microsoft's
Windows Memory Diagnostic:
http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag...
It can be toggled (press T) to do a standard or a more comprehensive set of tests - use the default 6 test one first - if it passes one pass of that, use the latter one. A few of the tests in the latter set are intentionally slower.
If you don't have a floppy drive, see the Quick Start Information at that Microsoft link for how to make a bootable CD of the Windows Memory Diagnostic (you need Windiag.iso - you don't necessarily need to use the program they mention to add it to the CD).
......

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.
....



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#3
February 13, 2009 at 08:50:26
Found this in Tech Arena:

STOP: c0000221 (Bad Image Checksum) The image urlmon.dll is possibly corrupt. The header checksum does not match the computed checksum.

Anybody can help explain this and how I can get away from this? Is this related to installation of automatic updates today which run when i turned off my computer. thanks a bunch!

Try running fsc (file system check). This should restore corrupted files, if all goes well.It requires a Windows disk or an equivalent source of Windows files (such as the folder C:\i386, if present).

In a command window, type fsc /? and a return to get some help, or look in Windows help or in Google


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Related Solutions

#4
February 13, 2009 at 11:59:35
deviant719

Are you trying to supply advice and you also have a similar problem?

" STOP: c0000221 (Bad Image Checksum) The image urlmon.dll is possibly corrupt. The header checksum does not match the computed checksum."

There's probably a lot more than just a problem with one specific file that can cause the error - sometimes it tells you when you get the STOP error which specific file is the problem - you may need to click on Details or similar.


"Try running fsc (file system check)"

That's sfc (system file checker).
It's been in Windows since Win 95 but the version in 2000 and up is vastly superior to older versions.
As far as I know you can only run it if you can get into Windows.
It may refuse to run if the source does not have SP2 updates or later included, if the existing Windows installation has SP2 or later updates installed; you may need to ignore error messages and click on Retry many times if it's reading from a CD.

It usually is not the update the itself that caused the problem, although, some recommend you set Automatic Updates to something other than default settings, so that you can examine the date the update was released before you allow it to be loaded - if it's a new update, don't allow it to be installed for at least a few days - if there are bugs in it that cause problems, Microsoft will correct the problem in a short time once enough people have contacted them about the problem.

Almost always, the problem is not with the update itself, it's with something else that's a little off about your computer that caused data corruption.
If you need to replace a supposedly corrupt or missing file file that's found on a Windows CD and you have one or the equivalent, but you can't boot normally into Windows, or if you need to know what might be a little off about your system that might have caused the data corruption, see the stuff in response 2.


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#5
February 16, 2009 at 08:56:13
Nope. I don't have the same problem.

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