WIN XP Boot disc

Msi motherboard / K8neo4
February 5, 2009 at 14:05:59
Specs: Windows XP, AMD Athlon 64 1 GB Ram
I have a WIN XP 8-in-1 boot disc, which has XP pro, tablet, media center, three versions of Home edition, etc. The only edition I have a key for is Home OEM, and this is the only one I use. Before I continue, let me clarify that I am NOT wanting to use any of the other versions illegally. I have a CD key for my version, and I will continue to use it legally.
Having said that, here is my dilemma. I only want the files required from the CD to create a WIN XP Home disc. The disc I have now is full, and what I want is just the files/folders required to perform an install of my edition. On this disc, I also want to include SP3, IE7, .Net2 framework, Media Player 11, Windows genuine advantage verifier, and perhaps even my legal copy of Office XP, if there is room. In a nutshell, I am tired of having all of these programs strewn out all over my HD, and on separate discs. Also, the multi-disc is old and unreliable, and though I have made a back up, I am tired of having to go through the motions of picking my version, etc... What I want is ONE disc with JUST WIN XP Home OEM, along with the rest of the progs I mentioned earlier. Can anyone tell me which files I need to copy from the 8-in-1 XP disc needed for installation? A screenshot of your installation disc would be helpful. Also, is there a way to integrate SP3 into the installation? Thanks for your time.


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#1
February 5, 2009 at 14:38:10
Why don't you just setup the computer the way you want it and use an cloning program such as Ghost?

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#2
February 5, 2009 at 15:25:15
Al you need is a program called nLite. You can use it to create your disc & add whatever software, drivers, etc that you like. I have a Win XP Home folder on my PC that I used to create a disc with SP2 slipstreamed into it. These are the contents of that folder:

4 folders: DOCS, I386, SUPPORT, VALUEADD

7 files: SETUP.EXE, WIN51, WIN51IC, README.HTM, SETUPXP.HTM, AUTORUN.INF, WIN51IC.SP2

http://www.nliteos.com/


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#3
February 5, 2009 at 15:33:20
What happened to the original CD for home?

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Related Solutions

#4
February 5, 2009 at 22:04:21
Thanks Jam, for showing me the correct files that should be in the installation folder. As for the Home CD, I never had one. I bought this 8 in 1 CD from a Computer store here in my hometown, when I bought the parts to upgrade my PC. Everything has always appeared to be legit. I have the sticker for the OEM version of XP Home, and the product key only works on this version. Also, Microsoft has authenticated it for me four times now. So if I have been misled somewhere by the store I bought it from, then I don't know what to say. I am sorry if the mods here close this thread, or if I have done anything that looks illegal- that was not my intention, But since I did pay for the CD and everything looks on the up and up, can you blame me? I mean, if it is an illegal copy, the person who made it did one hell of a job. From the bootup screen to the release notes, it looks official, and if you search the net, you will find other 8 or 9 in 1 CDs out there. But anyway, thanks for your replies.

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#5
February 6, 2009 at 05:51:07
I am not at all familiar with this type of CD. I wonder how 8 or 9 OSes can fit on one CD though.

I have seen versions of WinXP that are intended for computer builders to pre-install WinXP without registering the installation but the end user must then do that.

If you don't mind my asking, how did you end up with only a license for WinXP home and how much did the license cost? Did the license and CD come as a package?

When you install are you required to register the WinXP home within a certain time frame?


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#6
February 6, 2009 at 15:46:03
Othehill,
I paid $59.00 for the CD and the license, which I have checked online and seen this price elsewhere. I have the normal 30 day period in which to authenticate. The more I think about it, and discuss it with you and other forums, the more I feel I have been had, as far as having a legit copy. But why would MS authenticate it though? To be quite honest, when I bought the CD, I thought it was part of some sort of volume license deal that the shop I bought it from had. I am very computer literate, I am even attending College for Network Engineering, the Cisco side. But this has really got me down now. :(
No matter, I guess I can always go buy a new hard drive and purchase a copy of XP Pro for $119.00. The store I shop exclusively at now will sell it to me at that price, as long as I buy a significant piece of hardware, as do most stores I know of. And it will be in a box, a green box, from Microsoft! But when I make a backup copy, I am still going to want to put all of the progs that I mentioned on there too, so as to keep them in one place. I have been wanting to get a larger HD for some time now, probably a SATA.

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#7
February 6, 2009 at 15:55:15
You may be correct about the WinXP home being a volume license. I have seen that advertised in the past. That is also illegal, I believe. If it were me I would continue to use things as you have in the past.

Your reply only answered half my questions. I still don't understand how there could be 8 Microsoft OS versions on ONE 700MB CD.

As far as making a stand alone WinXP home CD goes I would recommend you slipstream SP3 in there using nlite. Very easy to do.

If you do that there is no need to include SP2.


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#8
February 6, 2009 at 22:01:12
8-in-1's (or 2-in-1's, 4-in-1's or whatever-in-1's) are generally illegal. Most of the time though I've seen them "created" legally by I.T. "gurus" to install mutiple O/S's from one disc. They generally have a generic text menu inquiring you which version you want to install. I'd suspect many of the generic files are common to all "flavors" of XP, with some slight variations depending on XP Home/Pro/Server(2K3)/Media/etc. Considering they don't include all the "fluff" which is common with almost all M$ install CD's, I'd say it'd be possible to get mutiple "flavors" of XP installs on a 700MB disc. I had a friend with a DVD (likely torrented or otherwise illegally obtained) which had every version of DOS/Win from DOS 3.3 to WinXP Pro...

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