Why would I have 29 versions of pagefile.sys?

March 26, 2013 at 15:55:05
Specs: Windows xp
My computer is showing pagefile01.sys, 02, 03, 04 to pagefile29.sys. What would cause this many pagefile.sys files to be created. If I have limewire and I'm promoted to ultrapeer could all the queries go into this file?

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#1
March 26, 2013 at 17:00:46
Beats me. Where are they located?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
March 26, 2013 at 17:57:44
I found this answer that windows will only support 16 pagefile.sys files. This blog says you can find info in registry. You can see your pagefile.sys files if you go in and turn it off and then view hidden files. You cannot open the files to see what is in them unless you have a special program. I wish I knew what program I could get to open them.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/...

When the system boots up, the Session Manager process determines the list of page files to open by reading the value in the HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management\PagingFiles. This value contains the name of the paging file as well as the minimum and maximum size of each paging file. Windows supports up to 16 page files. On a 32-bit system running the normal kernel, the maximum size of each page file is 4095 MB. On x64 systems and x86 systems with the PAE kernel, the maximum page file size is 16 terabytes (16TB). On IA-64 systems, each page file can be as large as 32 terabytes.
To view the list of page files, you can either look at the HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management\PagingFiles registry value. The paging file configuration settings are managed through the System utility in Control Panel. Below are two examples of page file settings:


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#3
March 26, 2013 at 18:15:52
Nice work - I should have thought of un-hiding protected files. I know of no program to view their contents.

As an aside to this, I know for a fact "registry entries" can be hidden (I had positive proof of this recently - long story).

Malware writers do it:
http://www.reviewingit.com/index.ph...

If on your travels you stumble across a freebie that can unhide registry entries then I'd love to know about it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
March 26, 2013 at 18:51:44
*******Microsoft Windows uses a paging file, called pagefile.sys, to store frames of memory that do not current fit into physical memory. Although Windows supports up to 16 paging files, in practice normally only one is used. This file, stored in %SystemDrive%\pagefile.sys is a hidden system file. Because the operating system keeps this file open during normal operation, it can never be read or accessed by a user. It is possible to read this file by parsing the raw file system (e.g. using The Sleuth Kit).

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#5
March 27, 2013 at 08:18:33
You could boot from a linux cd, delete them all, reboot and let windows recreate the file. Please wait for others to comment on this before trying it. Good luck with your promotion.

larry


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#6
March 27, 2013 at 09:48:28
The pagefile.sys file is normally the pagefile used by the memory management system. But since only the name and not the location or size of the these files has been given that may not be a safe assumption. These are important questions. I wouldn't even care to speculate without further information.

Since Windows will not normally create more than one pagefile per partition it seems questionable that they belong to the system.


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#7
March 27, 2013 at 10:59:09
I've no experience of multiple pagefile.sys files but have removed the single one many times in XP and it always rebuilds. A Live Linux CD would definitely remove them, as given in #5.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
March 27, 2013 at 14:33:04
I suspect you may have had issues with the page file being corrupt. Windows will automatically try and create a new one. On hard drives that are failing I have run into that because it eventually got to the point it simply could not create the page file. It may have been caused by a virus at some time, but they are created because the current page file become unusable for whatever reason.

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#9
March 27, 2013 at 14:59:25
Re #8

If you mean #7 then it was all my doing (no HD or virus problem). I've experimented quite a bit over the years to find out how things work. It was one way to ensure that the pagefile was defragged, although there are other methods.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
March 27, 2013 at 18:12:08
May brother built by computer and it has 8 partitions. Is there a pagefile.sys for each partition??

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#11
March 31, 2013 at 15:21:44
You should be able to get rid of spurious pagefiles, or to defrag the main one, by temporarily reducing it to, say, 200MB. Reboot, switch it to the size you want, or back to automatic sizing, and then reboot again.

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#12
March 31, 2013 at 20:49:08
no there is not a page file for each partition.

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#13
March 31, 2013 at 20:50:33
#8, was not a reference to #7 Derek, just so we are clear.

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