Why can blank CD-R discs only be used once?

August 1, 2015 at 22:45:13
Specs: Windows XP, Intel Celeron 1.30GHz
When I put in a new, never used cd, I can only use it once, no matter how small the file. For instance, if I save just one word, it will be saved on the cd, then the cd is ejected. If I put it back in and try to save another word, a message comes up saying that cd cannot be used, that I must insert a blank cd.

A local computer repair shop said it sounds like the cd is being automatically registered which prevents further use. I don;t think the word used was "registered", but i can't think of the word the shop used.

No one at the shop knew the solution. Their answer was to take my computer in and pay $65 an hour so they could check it out.

Anyone here know the solution?


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#1
August 1, 2015 at 23:05:35
The software you are using to burn CD-Rs is automatically finalizing the disk. That makes them unwritable. Since you don't say what software that is it is difficult to be more specific. (And I'd find a different computer shop - one that knows about computers.)

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#2
August 2, 2015 at 00:47:23
To add to what's already been said, I use an old Nero 5.5 version to burn cds. Before it records it asks, 'allow files to be added later (multisession disk)' and by default the box is checked. If I leave it that way then I can add files to a cd-r disk in a later session. If I un-check it then the disk is finalized and I can't add files later.

Whatever software you're using probably has a similar option but it defaults to not allowing later burning and you're not noticing it. Either that or it was configured that way when it was installed. You may need to reconfigure its settings.

There have been some complaints that disks which aren't finalized sometimes can't be read in other drives. So be aware of that possibility if you choose to use them as multisession disks.


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#3
August 2, 2015 at 21:12:17
CD-R were always meant for one write use. You could do multi-sesson where the first file recorded onto it disappears and you can't ever find it again, but you can put on a second file and so on until the disk is full. Then you can only read the last 'session'.

You might want to use a CD-RW disk instead - they were intended to be added to again and again to full capacity with the first file always being there. Then you erase them and start over if you want. I find the best type of these to buy are CD+RW because they seem to be accepted by more systems than the minus type.

http://www.cdrfaq.org/

Lee


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Related Solutions

#4
August 3, 2015 at 18:52:34
melee5... you can view previous sessions, if you couldn't the sessions exercise would be futile. Google for "sessions" and find out how.

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#5
August 6, 2015 at 08:11:56
Ewen is correct and Melee is somewhat correct. Theoretically, you can write multi-session discs many times and should be able to see all the previous sessions.

I have seen all to often though that the previous sessions do not show up for some reason after burning several sessions. I've seen many posts on here about it and I've also experienced it first hand. You can use something like ISOBuster to view the corrupt sessions but in my opinion, it's just not worth risking losing your data to write multi-session discs. Discs are so cheap these days, I recommend just writing to them once and finalizing the disc.


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#6
August 6, 2015 at 14:42:58
Thanks for catching my bad, Ewen. I had a different take on it at the time and decided that CD-R was for duplicating other CD-R only and wanted CD-RW in the first place. Never even tried multi-session because of that. This issue would be covered in the faq link I posted, but there too, I only read the parts I want to.

Lee


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