What's this server stuff?

Acer & hp / Acer netbook aoa150-1029...
March 17, 2009 at 12:16:47
Specs: XPH w/SP3 & Vista HoPrem, 2.0 Ghz with 2Gb RAM
I can't figure out how to tell if a patch or application download is suitable for my OS's because many times there's a blurp on the download page that says its only for Windows Server 2000, Windows 2003, Windows NT, etc.

Wherever the hell this info is ever disclosed, I don't know, so how does a user determine if the patch, etc., is suitable, vendors rarely write back and if they do, an interpreter is needed to figure out what they're saying.

Regards and hap-e-trails, Steve Hopper


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#1
March 17, 2009 at 12:23:24
If the computer works, do not fix it.

Take up basket weaving....Less stress.


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#2
March 17, 2009 at 12:25:42
Your info is as follows:

Name: Steve Hopper
Date: March 17, 2009 at 12:16:47 Pacific
OS: XPH w/SP3 & Vista HoPrem
CPU/Ram: 2.0 Ghz with 2Gb RAM
Manufacturer/Model: Acer & hp / Acer netbook aoa150-1029 & hp pavilion dv4-1030ee
Subcategory: Installation

Since you're using Vista, the only updates and patches you need to worry about are those that apply to your OS (operating system).

May I suggest in the future, just use the update function built into your OS....this will avoid confusion and the possibility of you trying to install one for the wrong OS.


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#3
March 17, 2009 at 14:19:17
It is rather difficult to decide what to do.

Updates are for OS, applications, drivers and even firmware.

Pretty much I'd suggest to use all OS updates, read up on application and driver updates and consider them mostly useful and needed. Firmware for devices and even bios updates need the most consideration. I say only consider if the read me has your issues exactly.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


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#4
March 17, 2009 at 16:16:46
You either have a dual boot computer (XP Home & Vista Home Premium) or you have two computers, one running each of the above OS's. You do not say. I would suggest if you are confused about patches then set Automatic Updates to on and let the system worry about it. No stress on your part.

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#5
May 2, 2009 at 17:39:42
Yes two pc's (Vista & XPH).

Still hoping for reply from someone who knows how users determine what an OS' is running w/respect to servers, windows 2003, windows NT, etc.

Just guessing that pc's likely default are running windows NT and windows 2003 at same time, but its discourgaing to find this site's readers seem to be ignoring a valid question.

I don't think I need to defend why I'm asking about it because all too often, unnecessary updates are being installed simply due to the writer is too lazy to use an activex routine to determine if the updates actually apply to a given setup.

Additionally, little to no attention is afforded the user's updates when new software is installed, which may thereafter make necessary the application of previously un-needed updates.

To expect users to blindly install patch upon patch (by trusting MS's update activex scans), clearly result in un-needed patches, clutter and even undesirable issues.

So the attitude of 'if it ain't broke', while colorful, doesn't apply where an OS can be vulnerable to becoming broken for lack of appropriately installed updates, plus the exclusion of ones that arent' (frequently causing serious OS issues that can only be resolved by formatting the machines).

So in that updates are usually accompanied by provisos identifying particular OS's (in less than interpretable terms), surely users either need to define those terms, or go without updating because the updates can't readily be determined as applicable for a given OS's setup.

So we're left to asking for info about identifying if the provisos apply (because MS, etc., simply is too lazy or untrained so as to adequately present updates).

Regards and hap-e-trails, Steve Hopper


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#6
May 2, 2009 at 17:52:14
If an update says it is for Windows Server 2003 and your OS is Windows Server 2003 then you use the updates. If you don't have windows Server 2003 you have no need of the update. What could be simpler.

You dont really need an Active X to tell you what OS you are running do you?

Stuart


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#7
May 2, 2009 at 18:14:47
Thank you so much for replying, but I posted so somone might tell me how to determine what all is running.

I run nearly fully patched laptops, Vista Home Premium and XPH SP3 and I'm finding folders for windows NT, etc., but that and server crud are both unfamiliar to me.

Just because there're folders and files for this stuff, doesn't mean that their running.

And as task manager and even BelArc profile details list (or don't list) windows 2003 or NT, doesn't mean their not running.

How does one determine what server one is running?

How does someone determine if windows NT is running and what else may be running that's associated with that aspect of the OS?

Regards and hap-e-trails, Steve Hopper


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#8
May 2, 2009 at 19:07:23
Let's be honest here, shall we.

The fact that you are ignorant of the OS running on your machine makes me think you know just enough to be dangerous Steven. You make a M$ update seem like it is about as clear as mud ... even going as far as accusing M$ of being too lazy or untrained so as to adequately present updates. What you are dealing with here is far from Advanced Quantum Mechanics.

I would suggest familiarizing yourself with M$' OS data grid but I'm apprehensive it might add to your confusion rather than clarify things.

Forgot to add:
Start → Run → Winver → OK should display M$ "About Windows." This tells you what you've got.

Jabbering Idiots: Everywhere You Look!


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#9
May 2, 2009 at 19:24:43
Thanks for the one tip. Wish you'd have spent your time adding more to the issue than my asking about it.

As for your propensity to attack members for asking questions and sharing well known issues (which you ignore), why waste everyone's time there?

Regards and hap-e-trails, Steve Hopper


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#10
May 2, 2009 at 21:13:55
You're welcome!

Jabbering Idiots: Everywhere You Look!


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#11
May 2, 2009 at 23:06:59
I really don't understand what you're trying to ask, so I'll just make a few assumptions. Every version of Windows since Windows 2000 is based on refined and updated code from Windows NT 4. This is why all these versions are sometimes referred to as Windows NT. I'm not sure how you're trying to incorporate servers into this, especially since you mention your laptops, which are workstations, not servers (2 different things). But whatever.

To clarify, laptops and desktops are workstations, not servers, so they don't run a server OS (unless a user wants to use one as a server, then he/she will install the OS manually).

If you have Automatic Updates turned on, Windows will automatically download and install any updates that are relevant to your system. No fuss, no mess.

WinSimple Software
CompTIA A+ Certified


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#12
May 3, 2009 at 03:21:01
I was going to write something similar to Sabertooth at 1 :00 AM this morning but I was too tired to bother.

You are making a problem where non exist. I would suggest you get a book on Microsoft Operating Systems then it will all become clear.

What well known issues you refer to I have no idea. I think you have been reading too much black proaganda. You are blaming Microsoft for your own lack of knowledge.

Stuart


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#13
May 13, 2009 at 00:47:56
When did this turn into a blog for those to express their opinions? I sure thought it was a forum where matters and resolutions were shared. If people have nothing to offer with respect to the post, it seems they simply want their user name splattered all over the place.

Regards and hap-e-trails, Steve Hopper


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