Solved What should I know about transfer things to a CD or DVD

December 17, 2013 at 12:03:24
Specs: Windows XP, 2 GB Ram
is a KB more? or less? then a MB?
I have a couple of pictures that I want to transfer to a CD or a DVD I dont know which one to use, the picture I want to transfer is 228 KB
If each picture is that size, how many could I put onto a disc? or wouold they each have to go onto a separate disc?
I am not computer literate so am not sure about what to do. Need help please.
nicki

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#1
December 17, 2013 at 12:17:16
✔ Best Answer
1KB is 1000 bytes, 1 MB is 1 million bytes or 1000KB. A CD is usually 700MB (megabytes). Single sided DVD are 4.3GB (gigabyes) or 4300 megabyes so you can store quite a few pictures on a disc. Your pictures aren't all going to be exactly 228KB though, so it will vary as to how many you can fit on a disc. 228KB is roughly a quarter of an MB so multiply that times 4, then multiply that times 700 and you will be able to put approx 2800 pictures on a single CD disc, or approx 17,200 pictures on a DVD disc. You can store thousands of pictures on a disc, you don't need a separate disc for each picture.

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#2
December 17, 2013 at 13:53:44
Bear in mind that although your picture is only 228 KB, some pictures can be 2 MB or more. Whatever, if you use the approximate conversions given you will be able to make a good estimate.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
December 18, 2013 at 09:14:28
1. If you are familiar with metric measurements, the memory scales for hard drive sizes and memory chips work the exact same way.

The base measurement is Bytes. 1 KB=1000 Bytes. 1 MB=1000 KB or 1,000,000 Bytes. 1 GB=1000 MB or 1,000,000 KB or 1,000,000,000 Bytes. 1 TB=1000 GB or 1,000,000 MB or 1,000,000,000 KB or 1,000,000,000,000 Bytes.

Each unit always goes up by a measure of 1,000.

2. Why are you using a CD or DVD? A USB memory stick will hold WAY more and will read and write much faster than a CD or DVD ever will. Depending on the size, you might even be able to get them for about the same price (or cheaper) than a big stack of CDs/DVDs. There's also the option of an external hard drive - they're usually between $50-200 and you can get those in excess of 2 TB if you want. Those will hold thousands of pictures and beyond. In the past year a technology called Solid State Drives (or SSD) were invented which means the drives have literally no moving parts in them - they've been proven to crash less (which means they last longer) and have faster read and write speeds than previous external hard drives. The best part is they're about the same price as non-SSD drives were in their primes.


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#4
December 18, 2013 at 09:39:24
OK, I'm being pedantic but KB in computers is 1024 Bytes not 1000 Bytes as it would be for metric. Each unit goes up by 1024. Using 1000 is of-course fine as an approximation as far as this particular post is concerned.

1,000,000,000,000 Bytes = 0.909 TB (rounded to 3 places).
Hard disk manufacturers almost always quote this wrongly - probably good for marketing though. If you look at drive properties in a computer MS get it right.

In metric 1000 is given as a small k. In computer data 1024 is given as capital K.

When we are dealing with frequency, we are back to 1kW = 1000W, as per metric.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#5
December 18, 2013 at 13:43:23
Just on other point. If you are copying these pictures for archive purposes, don't use a USB memory stick. They are notoriously unreliable for long term storage.

A CD/DVD is far the better option if you still want to be sure you can look at your photographs ten years in the future.

And while we are in a pedantic mood according to the ISO, a lower-case k signifies kilo. An upper-case K is reserved is for Kelvin. The idea of using a lower-case k for digital and upper case for metric is not something I have come across before. Context should tell you which is which.

Stuart


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#6
December 18, 2013 at 14:00:05
Hi THX 1138 and also everyone who posted an answer. I am not very computer wise. I am an 82 year old great grandmother. who just learned how to turn on a computer about 8 years ago. so each day is a new adventure for me.
Yesterday before I got any answers here, I put a CD into my computer, and transfered 8 different pictures onto it, I thought it would just about fill it up. now I find out that I could/can put on a lot more.
Thanks to everyone here. I have lots of problems with my computer lately, so you will certainly be hearing from me.
Thanks again. nicki

message edited by NickiRN


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#7
December 18, 2013 at 14:05:56
Thank you Derek:
Believe me I will be popping in here from time to time as lately I have been having lots of problems with my computer.
Nicki

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#8
December 18, 2013 at 14:05:59
StuartS

"using a lower-case k for digital and upper case for metric
I gave it the other way around in #4.

I had lower case k drummed into me for kilo (metric) and it complies with the standards book which hold. This also says the same:
http://ukma.org.uk/writing-metric

Can't be quite so emphatic on the K for KB (probably Kelvin too) but I'm not alone:
http://www.uswitch.com/broadband/gu...
I note that this changes when referring to bits.

The main point tho was the 1000 -v- 1024

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#9
December 18, 2013 at 14:14:09
NickiRN

Yes, please do, I'm sure there will be many folk pleased to help you.

Don't worry too much about the asides above LOL.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
December 18, 2013 at 14:18:31
Hi techninja:
You asked why I am using a CD? Because I did not even know how to transfer anything, or even what to use, a CD-R or a CD-RW ?and did not even know what they meant.LOL! I went to a big box store and they told me to get a CD-RW and said that I could put things on it , read them and also write on them so I bought a pack. but STILL did not know how to transfer. so finally after experimenting, I found out how to do it. I now have a laptop (still have not gotten it hooked up to the internet, have to get a router,(don't know which one or how to do it thought, lol!) so far the only thing I have on my laptop is recipes and some pictures. I have a USB 16 GB stick and also a 8 GB stick both still in the package. lol
Thanks again for your jhelp. Nicki

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#11
December 18, 2013 at 14:31:56
NickiRN

Re #10

They all have their places. CD-R are generally most reliable for longer term storage where you don't need to change anything - the others suffer over a long period due to them constantly being written and erased. If you delete something on a CD-R you don't get the space back but with CD-RW you do. Sometimes CD-RW are a bit fussier than CD-R when played on a different computer or domestic player.

Google (or whatever search engine you use) is very useful for general questions. It's surprising what you can find out if you type in the magic words. For example, if you were to have typed in "difference between CD-R and CD-RW" it would almost certainly have given you the answer in one of the hits. Otherwise just post on the forum.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

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#12
December 18, 2013 at 14:41:21
HI Derek:
Yes I use Google a lot, in fact I did put in what is the difference between a CD and DVD and also what is the difference between MB and GB and KB that is how I got onto this site. LOL

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#13
December 18, 2013 at 15:05:40
You are doing OK then - many of our posters don't seem to know the power of Google.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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