to speed up network & pc

Hcl infosystems limited / P4M800PRO-M
March 10, 2009 at 07:10:21
Specs: Microsoft Windows XP Professional, 2.794 GHz / 991 MB
hi i am using a 1GB Ram but it shows only around 600 mb is free after login into accounts.sometimes it will decrease to 400mbs (while running a single program itself like browser or any ).
i am having 80GB hard disk and had allotted about 50% to drive(xp) to say exactly 35GB is allotted and free space available is 25GB.I am regularly using cleaner to clean temp files and also perform registry clean also by CCLEANER and REGISTRY MECHANIC also manually delete the contents present in Temp folder
Tell me how to increase the speed of my pc.
Also tell me how to increase my downloading speed.
I am having broadband net connection with a speed of 100Mbps.But while downloading the speed is at the range of 10Kbps(minimum) to 25Kbps(maximum occurs rarely) only. help me how to increase the downloading speed.
pc details:
Manufacturer: Hcl infosystems limited
Model: P4M800PRO-M
OS: Microsoft Windows XP Professional
CPU/Ram: 2.794 GHz / 991 MB
Video Card: VIA/S3G UniChrome Pro IGP
Sound Card: Realtek AC'97 Audio for VIA (R) Audio Controller
Antivirus :Avast version 4.8 professional
also had installed Microsoft .net 2005

Thank you


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#1
March 10, 2009 at 19:02:10
"i am using a 1GB Ram but it shows only around 600 mb is free "

After Windows has first loaded.....

Start - Run - type: msinfo32 (click OK or press enter)

What does it say the Available Physical Memory is?
.......

You certainly have plenty of ram available, so that alone wouldn't slow your Windows speed. XP runs very well on 512mb of total ram for most things.
.....

"I am regularly using cleaner to clean temp files and also perform registry clean also by CCLEANER and REGISTRY MECHANIC also manually delete the contents present in Temp folder "

Doing that has very little if any effect on the speed your system runs at, unless you don't have enough free space on the partition Windows is on. Same goes for Defrag.

"...35GB is allotted and free space available is 25GB..."

You have lots of free space. If it was, say, 2gb or less, then Windows will run slower than it should.
.........

The max data transfer speed on the internet is much slower than in Windows otherwise. It's determined by the max. speed of the internet connection you pay for, the traffic to the site you're accessing (how loaded the servers are) at the time you access the site, and the max capabilities of the site, which may be much slower than your max internet connection speed.

All networking related speeds, including for your network adapter, your router, and your internet connection speed, are rated in BITS per second, not BYTES per second which everything else uses. There are 8 BITS per BYTE, but because of error correction and other networking overhead, if you divide the rate in BITS per second by about 10, that's about the maximum raw speed you get in BYTES per second, but you never actually achieve that.
....

"I am having broadband net connection with a speed of 100Mbps......."

Is it a DSL or ADSL (telephone line), or a cable high speed modem?

You're confusing the max speed of your network adapter, which is commonly 100mbps, with the speed of your internet connection.

Go to
http://performance.toast.net/
Choose Shuttle and text on the left, choose a web host on the right, click on Run Test.

Tell me what the result is.

It's in BITS per second.
That's your approximate max. speed on the internet. It varies depending which web host (server) location you use, where you are on the internet in relation to the web host (server), and how busy the web host (server) is at the time you run the test.
......

"......while downloading the speed is at the range of 10Kbps(minimum) to 25Kbps(maximum occurs rarely)"

Depending on what you're looking at, that's either in BITS per second, or BYTES per second (about 1/10th the rate in BITS per second), but either way that's rather slow.

That's determined by the SLOWEST of any of these: how well your high speed modem connection is working at that moment, the TCP/IP settings in Windows, the max. capabilities of the program you are using to download with, the max. speed of the internet connection you pay for, the traffic to the site you're accessing (how loaded the servers are) at the time you access the site, and the max capabilities of the site, which may be much slower than your max. internet connection speed.

You can't do anything about some of those things, but you can do these things....

- try re-booting your high speed modem, or your combo router/high speed modem (common for a DSL or a ADSL connection) to see if you then get a better connection - if it has a switch, turn it off, turn it on; if it doesn't unplug the power adapter where it plugs into the device, plug it back in. Wait a short time until the leds on it indicate it has a working connection (e.g. some modems will blink an led rapidly) - try the internet or downloading again to see if there is an improvement.

- Windows default TCP/IP settings for the internet are not ideal. You can use a program to improve that situation.

e.g. download TCPOptimizer from here - save it to your Desktop:
http://www.speedguide.net/downloads...
Run it,
choose Cable or DSL, whichever applies
choose the network adapter you connect to the internet with
choose Optimize, save settings, you are prompted to reboot.

TCPOptimizer uses no resources once it has run, it only needs to be run once (until the next time Windows is loaded from scratch), and it saves a backup so you can run it and go back to former settings if you want to, but you probably won't want to.

- you can use a dedicated downloading program to improve your download speeds by various methods.
E.g. a Torrent downloading program, such as Bit Comet, can improve download speeds of many types of files. However, it may be confusing for a newbie to use. I don't use it myself.
Or some other download accelerator program. I don't use one myself.
.........

"Video Card: VIA/S3G UniChrome Pro IGP"

That's not a video card - it's just a video chipset that's built into one of the main chipset chips. It has no ram of it's own (a video card in a slot does) - it shares the ram installed in the ram slots.

Sharing the ram with the onboard video drastically reduces the max bandwidth (the max.data transfer rate) of the ram from what it would otherwise be - it as much as halves it.

If you use ANY video card in a slot, preferably one in an AGP slot in your case, on most mboards doing that disables the onboard video and the sharing of the mboard ram with it automatically, and the ram is then able to use it's full max. bandwidth. That makes the most noticiable difference when some program benefits from a faster data transfer rate being available. You WOULD notice the difference in max. ram performance, and if you use an AGP card, your video will perform MUCH better than the onboard video.
However, you MIGHT also have to get a power supply with more capacity, depending on which video chipset is on the card you use.
(What's the wattage rating of your power supply?)

"Model: P4M800PRO-M"

Apparently that's your ECS mboard model.
It has an available 8X AGP slot for a video card.
It can use DDR or DDR2 ram (not both). If you're using DDR ram, your mboard will perform better with DDR2 ram - it's cheap these days.

.......

Your bios is reporting 991mb of ram - it subtracts 1mb for the conventional memory amount the operating system, Windows in this case, can't use for itself or storing user data, and 8mb for the onboard video.
You can increase the amount of ram shared with the onboard video to a higher amount in your bios Setup settings - up to 64mb - that will improve your onboard video performance.


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#2
March 10, 2009 at 21:13:10
thank you very much for the detailed descriptions.i have given the details for msinfo32,What does it say the Available Physical Memory is?
Total physical memory : 1,024.00MB
Available physical memory: 507.20MB
Total virtual memory: 2.00 GB
Available virtual memory: 1.96 GB
Page file space: 1.58 GB

did the allotted memory is enough.Whether it should be modified?if yes at what range it should be changed and also tell me how to change the allocations
---------------
i cant understand this
----------------
Doing that has very little if any effect on the speed your system runs at, unless you don't have enough free space on the partition Windows is on.
-----------------
are you saying about free space available in other disk
i had allotted the disk space as
Local disk(c): 39.0GB free space available :25.9GB
Local disk(d): 9.76GB free space available :7.47 GB
Local disk(e): 4.88GB free space available :3.52 GB
Local disk(f): 9.76 GB free space available: 8.75 GB
Local disk(g): 11GB free space available : 3.72 GB

Is it a DSL or ADSL (telephone line), or a cable high speed modem?

It is connected to the ADSL modem/router with the Ethernet cable.
-----------------
Go to
http://performance.toast.net/
Choose Shuttle and text on the left, choose a web host on the right, click on Run Test.

Tell me what the result
-----------------
i had performed three test for the same web host giving about 3 to 4 minutes gap for each test
selected web host Microsoft office live
1.Your throughput: 175* K
2.Your throughput: 207*k
3.Your throughput: 203* K
-----------------
It can use DDR or DDR2 ram (not both). If you're using DDR ram, your mboard will perform better with DDR2 ram - it's cheap these days.
------------
my mboard had 4 slots two for DDR1 and two for DDR2

i am currently using two DDR2 RAM each having 512MB

thank you


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#3
March 10, 2009 at 23:56:34
"Total physical memory : 1,024.00MB
Available physical memory: 507.20MB"

The amount of Available Physical Memory stated there varies depending on which programs are running when you use msininfo32 (System Information).
The reason I asked you to run it
"After Windows has first loaded....."
is that's when you see the max. Available Physical Memory amount.

If that isn't what you did, please do that again to get the proper max. amount

If that IS what you did, you have way too many programs that are loading when Windows starts up, and most of those, or all of those, don't actually need to load - the programs listed there will work anyway - they just may take a bit longer to load when you need to use them.
I can tell you what to do about that.

Keep in mind whatever amount Windows subtracts from the Total Physical Memory amount to determine the Available Physical Memory amount figure includes the 1mb used for conventional memory, and the amount of ram shared with the onboard video (8 presently, up to 64mb) .
........

"did the allotted memory is enough.Whether it should be modified?if yes at what range it should be changed and also tell me how to change the allocations"

You don't normally mess with most of those things, and you probably don't need to.

You have a lot more than enough Available Physical Memory, that in itself is not causing Windows to be slower, but there are things that can be done to increase that amount some - load fewer progams automatically when Windows first starts up, for one.

Total physical memory : - the amount of ram in slots
Available physical memory: - varies according to which and how many programs are loaded when you look at msinfo32

Total virtual memory: - by default this size is automatically "dynamically" determined by Windows - it varies depending on the needs of the programs loaded - usually you're best off to have Windows do that - you can specify specific sizes or maximum or minimums but if you do that you will likely have problems sometimes, and that has little if any affect on the speed Windows runs at anyway.

Available virtual memory: Varies depending on the programs loaded. By default, when programs need more than the Total virtual memory, Windows tempoarily increases the Total virtual memory amount so the Available virtual memory can be larger.

Page file space:- a file the contents of which are changing all the time as Windows is being used to cache some of the data used by Windows and programs on the hard drive on the partition Windows has been installed on, which is usually C.
By default Windows determines this file size automatically, it makes it larger or smaller "dynamically" if needed for the programs that are running. You can specify a specific or max or min size but it's best to let Windows do that, and that has little or no effect on the speed at which Windows runs.
.......

"I cant understand this."

Read the entire part in response1 beween the short dotted lines from

"I am regularly using cleaner ...."
to
"You have lots of free space...."

The things you were doing will not make any noticable difference regarding how fast Windows runs, because they only increase the free space a little bit, and you had plenty of free space on the partition Windiows was installed on anyway.

Only the amount of free space available on the partition Windows was installed on - which is usually C - can have an effect regarding how fast Windows runs - you do not have that problem because you have plenty of free space there.
......

"It is connected to the ADSL modem/router with the Ethernet cable."

I have the same.
You can have problems regarding your actual max .modem speed and having to re-boot the modem that you don't have with a cable modem, related to whether you are getting electric or electronic noise on the telephone line. You don't necessarily hear it audibly when you pick up a phone on the same line, and the older the overhead telephone lines are between you and the nearest telephone exchange, the more likely you are to have problems.

I have that problem frequently, yet my neighbours on ADSL don't seem to. Our telephone lines are overhead on poles and were put up in 1959 in our part of our city.

If your telephone lines are newer or are underground rather than overhead on poles, you're less likely to have that problem.

Also, there is a max. distance limit you can be from the nearest telephone exchange with DSL and ADSL - if you're at a location closer to the limit, you're more likely to have a slower max. actual high speed modem internet speed.

Also, the shorter the cheap flat telephone cable between the ADSL modem and the wall jack, the better - they act like an antenna, and the longer they are, the more likely electric or electronic noise will be picked up by them.
..........

"i had performed three test for the same web host giving about 3 to 4 minutes gap for each test
selected web host Microsoft office live
1.Your throughput: 175* K
2.Your throughput: 207*k
3.Your throughput: 203* K"

When you run the same speed test again without using your computer to do something else between tests within a short time, the files loaded by the test on your computer are still in the Windows page file on your hard drive are still there so it takes a little less time for the test to run after the first time, so after the first test the results are a little better but they don't indicate the actual situation. Do something else between the tests - then the other tests are valid too.

Those are poor results.

You may get better results with a different web host.

We have an economy internet package for ADSL here available from my ISP that has a max speed of 500kbps, but even if you have that, your results are only about 40% of that.

Are you a long way from the nearest telephone exchange?
Are you connected to overheard telephone lines?
Did you try re-booting the modem?
Can you hear any noise when you pick up a phone on the same telephone line (you may not in any case)?
Staticy, crackling, clicks and pops, a hum?
How long is the telephone cable between the modem and the wall jack? Longer than 6 feet / 2m or so?

My ADSL package's max speed is 1500kps, but it rarely gets above 1300kbps at that same site for the same test, using the web host that yields me the best results



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#4
March 11, 2009 at 19:07:56
How to load fewer programs as Startup programs as Windows loads.

Start - Run - type: msconfig (click OK or press Enter)
Click on the Startup tab.

The short version.......

- Disable everything listed there you do not need to load by clicking on the small square box to remove the checkmark at the beginning of the lines.
- You can disable anything listed in the Startup list, and still have the option of enabling it again.

- In 2000 and XP, when you have made a change with msconfig, after you reboot, you will see two System Configuration Utility windows pop up as Windows is loading the desktop.
- If you click on the small square box in the first window to insert a checkmark there, the second window will not pop up, and neither window will pop up as Windows loads the desktop while booting after that.
- If you don't insert the checkmark in the first window, both windows will appear every time you boot, until you undo the changes you made with msconfig so the situation is the same as it was before you made the change, or until you enable ALL the entries listed under Startup, or until you DO insert the checkmark in the first window.
- If you're not sure whether you want to insert the checkmark yet, close both windows, e.g. by clicking on the large X top right in each window.

In Win 98SE and previous back to Win 95, and probably ME too, you do NOT get the two System Configuration Utility windows popping up after you reboot after you use msconfig to disable something from loading. If you need to enable something you disabled, you have to remember to use msconfig again to do that.

Msconfig does not come with Win 95, but it can be copied from a Win 98, 98SE, or a ME? Windows installation and it works fine in Win 95.
.......

The long version - the details and explanations........

All the lines listed there that are enabled load programs as Startup programs every time Windows loads.

Most of the entries there are placed there when you install software that was not included with Windows, or in a few cases, when you use software that was not included with Windows.

How do the ones installed by a software installation get there?

You sometimes have the option of not loading some of the entries for programs when you install the software, but they're often enabled by default and many people don't change the default settings while installing the software, or you may only have the option to not load them if you choose the Custom install or similar rather than the default Express or whatever one, or sometimes you are not given the option in any case and they are placed there are automatically without you being aware of that.

Do you need all the enabled lines to load?

Many people have way too many things loading there. You certainly do NOT need to load most of them.
Most of them merely allow you to access something a tiny bit faster, and/or some place an icon in your taskbar on the bottom right of your screen that allows you to access something from there or show you the status of something, or something is loaded that is a feature of the software that is useful but you may have no need to use that or load that feature all the time.
Most if not all of the things loaded listed under Startup can also be easily accessed somewhere else in Windows.

How does what is loaded affect the performance of Windows?

They directly affect how long it takes Windows to load the desktop when you boot into Windows, and how long it initially takes Windows to get to a state where nothing further is loading, such that the system is in an idle state.
Some of them only use resources while loading and then don't use any resources after that, so they only have an effect on how long it takes the desktop to load intially, some use resources while loading and also use resources for a short time while doing something after that (such as updating software), then use far less resources or no resources, but many of them use resources including the memory available to Windows continuously all the time Windows is running after they have been loaded.
If you don't have enough available physical ram capacity left when those programs are loaded, that will slow down Windows some, all the time.

(ponnalgu - that is NOT your case regarding your ram - you have a lot more than enough available physical memory.)

What can be disabled from loading?

You can disable anything listed in the Startup list, and still have the option of enabling it again, e.g. if you find an icon in your taskbar you often use or need to see (e.g. a status icon, such as for anti-malware software, e.g. AVG, or Avast! has two of them) is missing.

Why do some entries appear again and enabled on their own?

A few of the entries you can disable from loading there will enable themselves automatically eventually if Windows continues to be used without rebooting - e.g. ctfmon - because they're actually loaded elsewhere, and a few will stay disabled until after you reboot, then will enable themselves automatically for a similar reason, and a few will appear there again on their own whenever you use a program or access a file associated by default with the program (the program is associatied with the file extension the file has) - e.g. Quicktime, Real Player.

What do I do when there is more than one identical line for loading a program, one enabled, one or more disabled, listed?

If there are more than one identical lines (including the location of where the program is) that load something, if you enable all of them, there will be only one enabled entry for that same line after you reboot.

Is it necessary to load some of the lines?

A few of the Startup entries may be necessary.
E.g.
- anti-malware programs may have a line or lines there that enable it to automatically check for updates as Windows is loaded, and if available, load them in the background when Windows first loads. E.g. AVG 8.x, Avast!
- many anti-malware programs may have a line there that places a status icon in your toolbar bottom right of your screen that shows whether the program is up to date or whether it has a problem -- e.g. AVG 7.5, AVG 8.x, Avast! ?
- a few anti-malware programs may have a line there that loads the resident scanner module for the program - the part than scans for suspicious activity or questionable files all the time - e.g. Avast! ?, but NOT AVG 7.5 or 8.x. Most anti-malware programs must be accessed in the program configuration itself in order to enable/disable the resident scanners module(s).

A few of the Startup entries may be optional, but you may want to enable them.

A few of the Startup entries may NOT be necessary, but you regularly use the feature that is loaded, so you want it to be enabled e.g. Microsoft Messenger, Yahoo Messenger, or similar (you can usually access all of those elsewhere as well anyway, so it's not mandatory to load the Startup entry for it).

Other than the entries you may need to load, or that load on their own no matter what you do, you can disable EVERYTHING else from loading, and benefit from it taking less time for the desktop to load intially, and probably from having more memory available for other things all the time Windows is running.
.......

Glitches when you use msconfig.

The two System Configuration Utility windows that pop up.

See the part at the beginning of this after
The short version.......

- in 2000 and XP, when you have made a change with msconfig, etc.

See above:

Why do some entries appear again and enabled on their own?

and

What do I do when there is more than one identical line for loading a program, one enabled, one or more disabled?
...

Msconfig disabled entries are not removed when you un-install the software that installed the disabled lines.

Msconfig often does it's disabing by removing, or by changing the state of, entries in the Registry. In the case of Startup entries, they're removed from the registry when you disable them, after you reboot.

If you remember to enable the disabled entries before you un-install the software that installed it, the related entries in the Registry are usually un-installed too.

If you didn't remember to do that, you can......

- ignore the disabled entry - it has no effect on your computer anymore .

or - if you can't stand it being there.....

enable the now useless entry in msconfig, reboot the computer,and either...
- use some registry cleanup program such as ccleaner to remove the useless registry entry for the entry in msconfig - Startup.
- if you're careful - use Regedit and search the registry for the exact text of the useless line in msconfig - Startup, or a chunk of it, and delete the useless line from the registry.
....

Normally, enabled entries in Startup are NOT more or less in alphabetical or numerical order - they're in the order in which they were added to the Startup list.

Windows XP (and 2000?) has this stupid tendancy of re-arranging disabled entries so they're more or less in alphabetical or numerical order, so the disabled entries are often NOT in the same order as they were when they were enabled.
If you want to re-enable entries that are disabled, that can be confusing as to just what you disabled.

The only workaround for that is to write down the entries you disabled BEFORE you disable them, and to keep that list handy for a while.

The same applies when you choose to disable all entries when not all of them were enabled, and you later want to enable only the ones that were enabled before again. Usually the list you need to make is shorter if you just list what was enabled.

Win 98SE and previous back to Win 95, and probably ME too, do NOT re-arrange disabled entries so they're more or less in alphabetical or numerical order. They're in the same order they were in before they were disabled.

.....

FYI

It's a good idea to have a shortcut to msconfig on your desktop screen all the time, to remind you it's there and can be used to ...
- check whether you have too many things loading as Startup programs, especially after you, or something else, installed software you didn't have installed before.
- temporarily disable everything in Startup from loading whenever you install software, especially larger more complicated programs or suites of programs, to prevent anything normally loaded in the list from interfering with the proper installation of the software.
It's recommended you also disable the resident module(s) of your anti-malware software when you do that as well, to prevent the loaded module(s) from interfering with the proper installation of the software.
If you do both of those things, you'll rarely have problems caused because of software not installing properly - it often isn't obvious why it didn't install properly otherwise.



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