system and boot partition

August 17, 2006 at 05:02:01
Specs: winxp/2003, 3.2/512
what is the exact difference between system partiiton and boot partiton.......and if we have multiple boot environment then would then be only one boot partition and multiple system partitions....... hopefully u guys will clarify all this

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#1
August 17, 2006 at 05:32:47
http://www.theeldergeek.com/hard_drives_01.htm

this will probably not make any sense. I cant seem to figure out

Jim R


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#2
August 17, 2006 at 06:49:59
Any one computer only ever has one boot drive. Thats the one that get everything up and running. There is a system drive for every OS installed.

In a conventional Windows installation the boot drive and the system drive are usually one and the same. If you install another version of Windows you create another system drive, but retain the same boot drive. But it is only a system drive while that OS is active. An inactive OS just looks like any other data to the active OS in a multi boot system.

The boot drive contains boot.ini, ntdetect.sys, ntldr. The system drive contains the actual operating system. The boot drive is the first thing the BIOS looks at to get the computer up and running. Boot.ini tells the boot loader where to find the rest of the OS.

With windows the boot drive must be on a primary partition. The system drive can be a logical drive on a secondary partition.

All the above only applies to Windows 2000/XP. With Windows 98 things are slightly different but the same principles apply.


Stuart


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#3
August 17, 2006 at 10:20:51
The Offical Microsoft defination of boot drive is where the OS resides. System disk is defined as where the boot files are located.

There is some confusion in the industry because for years Microsoft called where the boot files were located the boot drive. For example in MSDOS days io.sys, msdos.sys and command.com were located at the root of c: and that was the boot drive.

Now the boot drive is where the OS resides so for example where the Winnt or Windows folder resides. System is where the boot.ini, ntldr and ntdetect reside.

Note that with everything on one partition it is both boot and system.

Here is a link you may find interesting.
http://homepages.tesco.net/J.deBoynePollard/FGA/boot-and-system-volumes.html

Here is the offical MS view which you will find matches what I have written
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470/

Give a person a fish, they eat for a day. Suggest they internet search and they learn a skill for a lifetime.


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#4
August 17, 2006 at 12:03:16
The hard disk (normally C:) with the Master Boot Record is the 'boot' drive. Any other drives with an OS can be considered 'system' drives.

Do yourself a favor BACKUP!


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#5
August 17, 2006 at 13:03:14
Read my post ham30. We are in a Microsoft forum and hence we should answer a Microsoft based question with a MS based answer. That makes two wrong answers to the original question.

Give a person a fish, they eat for a day. Suggest they internet search and they learn a skill for a lifetime.


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#6
August 17, 2006 at 13:09:54
Quote from ms article link:

"There will be one (and only one) System partition, but there will be one Boot partition for each operating system in a multi-boot system"

which answers your question about multiboot vagabond2006

Give a person a fish, they eat for a day. Suggest they internet search and they learn a skill for a lifetime.


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#7
August 17, 2006 at 13:16:50
I stand by my post Wanderer. I disagree with whoever wrote that MS article. But it's only semantics

Do yourself a favor BACKUP!


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#8
August 17, 2006 at 13:40:14
actually its not semantics but accuracy of information. you are entitled to your opinion but should not state it as a factual answer to a Microsoft based answer.

Sure I was brought up Old School also where boot meant location of boot files. This is New School.
You wouldn't apply NT concepts/terminology to Active Directory would you?

With technology, the fastest way I know of to be left in the dust is stay with the old ways. That includes vocabulary.

Give a person a fish, they eat for a day. Suggest they internet search and they learn a skill for a lifetime.


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#9
August 17, 2006 at 13:43:12
According to MS I got the system and boot partitions reversed. Seems logical to call the partition that gets the whole thing moving the boot partition but that doesn't seem to be the case.

Stuart


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#10
August 17, 2006 at 13:50:21
How can you call a partition with a volume boot record (VBR) a boot partition? It can only be booted when called from a drive with an MBR.

Do yourself a favor BACKUP!


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#11
August 17, 2006 at 14:04:06
How about this ... We call the drive with the MBR a primary boot partition and a partition with a VBR a secondary boot partition. :-)

Do yourself a favor BACKUP!


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#12
August 17, 2006 at 14:56:44
LOL that's good :-)
Of course all those MS books have to be changed now...

I never did get to the bottom of WHY MS changed the description. It's been 5-6 years now since they did the reverse from msdos days.

Give a person a fish, they eat for a day. Suggest they internet search and they learn a skill for a lifetime.


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#13
August 17, 2006 at 16:23:48
Well, I guess we have no choice but to follow the wishes of the almighty M$.

Do yourself a favor BACKUP!


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#14
August 18, 2006 at 09:44:10
ONLY when we have to...

Give a person a fish, they eat for a day. Suggest they internet search and they learn a skill for a lifetime.


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#15
August 18, 2006 at 11:00:08
u guys have increased my confusions instead of resolving the problem .......

is there a simple answer for my question ???
which is globally approved and understood and has become standard


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