STOP 0x3F error

June 10, 2009 at 08:09:07
Specs: Windows XP, 2Gb
I am getting an intermittent BSOD 0x3F error.
...usually after having the laptop on for a while but running over 1Gb memory in applications. I have 2Gb installed.
I ran a hard drive scan - fine.
I tested memory with memtest on 1 pass - fine.
The error doesn't list "out of PTES" so it can't be that but that's the only reference I can find on Google searches.
What else could it be?
I replaced the memory recently to upgrade to 2x1Gb sticks. I replaced 1 of the memory sticks as I thought it was faulty but no change.

Any ideas?

There's no way I can identify if it is a driver as I have no way of knowing what drivers have been installed in the last few months as I have been installing and uninstalling various bits of software.

Error code 0000003f, parameter1 00000000, parameter2 0000000b, parameter3 000000e1, parameter4 000003df.


See More: STOP 0x3F error

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#1
June 10, 2009 at 21:53:34
If the computer works ok in safe mode, try disabling all services and startup programs using the msconfig tool. See if you still have the issue, then start them up in sequence to troubleshoot the device or driver that is causing the issue.

Start, Run, "MSCONFIG"
Click on the "Services" Tab, put a check in "Hide all Microsoft Services", then click "disable all"
Click on the "Startup" Tab, click "disable all"
Reboot and test


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#2
June 11, 2009 at 00:30:54
The problem is that the computer starts fine. I might get the error after 5 hours, or it might be 2 days, or it might be 30mins.
Starting each program in turn is going to take a long time let alone the fact that I need all the programs on a daily basis :)
Why doesn't the driver get listed in the BSOD?
Is there any software I could use to help track the problem?

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#3
June 11, 2009 at 01:04:19
You may get more info from minidumps. Make sure it is Enabled.
Control Panel --> System --> Advanced --> Startup and Recovery --> Settings ---> Write debugging
information --> Complete memory dump.
On XP and 2003 systems, mini dumps are located at %SystemRoot%\Minidump, or c:\Windows\Minidump; kernel and full dumps are located at %SystemRoot%\MEMORY.DMP or c:\Windows\MEMORY.DMP.
How to solve Windows system crashes in minutes
http://www.networkworld.com/news/20...
http://www.codeproject.com/KB/debug...
http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devto...
Install Debugging Tools for Windows 64-bit Version
http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devto...
http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devto...
http://forums.majorgeeks.com/showth...
This primer will show you how to solve problems quickly. Using a tool that costs nothing, you can solve approximately 50% of Windows server and workstation crashes in a few minutes. The tool is WinDbg, the free Windows debugger.
You've probably never used the debugger, don't have it and don't want it. After all, it's a developer's tool, not an administrator's, right? Yes, but what you need to know is remarkably easy to learn, and even a rudimentary familiarity with the debugger could enhance your skills and your resume.
Still hesitant? Think about this: After rebooting a crashed machine, we've brought up the debugger, opened a memory dump file, given the debugger a single command, and learned not only that the cause was a driver, but also the driver's name — all in less than a minute. Granted, the debugger was installed and configured, we knew what commands to use and what to look for.
But so will you by the end of this article.
Or,
Grabtxt
http://www.snapfiles.com/get/grabtx...
http://halmisbah.blogspot.com/2008/...
Capture text from Windows error dialogs.
Grabtxt is a simple utility that enables you to capture the text portions from many Windows dialog boxes. The captured text can be copied to the clipboard (Ctrl+C) or used to search for details via Google or Live.com with the provided shortcut buttons. The program can be useful if you need to copy an error message for a bug report or want to find out additional information via online search engines without having to manually type the text. Grabtxt worked with most, but not all, Windows dialogs that we tested.
Requirements: .NET Framework 2.0 W2000/XP/2003/Vista.
Or,
Event Log Explorer
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System...
http://www.eventlogxp.com/
http://www.eventlogxp.com/download/...
Event Log Explorer is a free software for viewing, monitoring and analyzing events recorded in Security, System, Application and another logs of Microsoft Windows NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista ( 32 & 64 bit ) operating systems. It extends standard Event Viewer monitoring functionality and brings new features. Free registration.

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Related Solutions

#4
June 11, 2009 at 01:26:40
Right...
WinDebug states trhis:
BugCheck 3F, {0, d, a0, 3df}

Unable to load image vsdatant.sys, Win32 error 0n2
*** WARNING: Unable to verify timestamp for vsdatant.sys
*** ERROR: Module load completed but symbols could not be loaded for vsdatant.sys
Probably caused by : vsdatant.sys ( vsdatant+40550 )

Followup: MachineOwner
---------

That .sys file I think is linked to ZoneAlarm, is that correct?
This is the same file that has "PROBABLY" caused the crash the last 3 times.
So, reinstall ZoneAlarm maybe? Seems strange as the software's pretty good...


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#5
June 11, 2009 at 02:03:17
Yep, zonealarm it is.

vsdatant.sys
http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=...

Fully Uninstall Software Firewalls
http://www.scotsnewsletter.com/35.h...


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#6
June 12, 2009 at 06:45:26
I reinstalled zonealarm but get the same error. I doubt this is a common problem with zonealarm so any ideas why it is on my system? I could try another firewall but don't believe anything quite matches up to Zonealarm in terms of use and the fact it's free.

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#7
June 12, 2009 at 09:02:12
I use the built in XP firewall & a strong password in my router.

Every third party firewall product such as ZoneAlarm and Kerio have exposed the very users they're suppose to protect to complete system level compromise.
Ironically the built in Windows XP SP2 firewall which always gets unfairly picked on has never had any remote exploits. Sure it doesn't provide any outbound packet filtering which is only relevant if my computer is already owned in which case any firewall could be disabled anyways, but at least it doesn't leave me wide open to a remote attacker.
http://www.securityfocus.com/infocu...
http://www.securityfocus.com/infocu...

Is the XP SP2 firewall getting a raw deal?
http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/?p=81
http://www.fefe.de/pffaq/
http://home.comcast.net/~SupportCD/...
Myth: Host-Based Firewalls Must Filter Outbound Traffic to be Safe.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-au/...
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...
How Much Security Can Outbound Filtering Provide?
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...
Trend Micro: Antivirus industry lied for 20 years
http://resources.zdnet.co.uk/articl...
Hack lets intruders sneak into home routers
http://news.zdnet.com/2100-1009_22-...
http://compnetworking.about.com/od/...
If you haven't changed the default password on your home router, let this recent threat serve as a reminder.


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#8
June 12, 2009 at 10:29:52
The XP firewall doesn't do anything. You can't stop programs from going out to the internet so if you get malware installed, it will immediately connect. ...in XP anyway...

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#9
June 12, 2009 at 12:55:36
I have xp firewall on as well as Sygate. I sed to block off ports in my router but decided it was too much effort to keep opening new ones as I install/uninstall software all the time and each bit of software uses different ports.

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#10
June 12, 2009 at 13:08:22
Buy yourself a router and get behind it. Routers act as a hardware firewall.

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#11
June 12, 2009 at 13:42:20
i am

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#12
June 12, 2009 at 13:43:10
routers only act as a firewall if the ports are blocked off. they do nothing otherwise.

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#13
June 12, 2009 at 13:52:35
That is true but there is no good reason to have open ports when you are not actually online.

I have checked my wired router and all ports but 80 are closed by default. 80 is in stealth mode.

The outside world only see the address of the router.

Anyway, I recall reading about 6 months ago, reviews that gave Zone alarm poor marks.


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#14
June 12, 2009 at 13:56:38
80 isn't the only important port though :)
I can't count how many different ports my apps use. Besides...a hacker will most likely target 80 and 21

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#15
June 12, 2009 at 14:04:04
I am not suggesting you only use a router.

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