Serious error on startup

April 5, 2009 at 15:26:16
Specs: Windows XP
Putting Windows into Hibernation was working fine before, but then I switched hard drives. Since I didn't have much on the last hard drive, I didn't copy anything over but started fresh, and with a formatted drive.

After having put the computer in hibernation, I start the computer and eventually see a blue error screen that doesn't stay up long enough to look at. The computer restarts and then I get the option to:

Delete and Restore Data and continue with System Boot

or

Continue with Restore Data (which just does this same thing over and over)

I choose the first option and the computer starts and I get a "The system has recovered from a serious error." message.

Here is some more information:

BCCode: 7a
BCP1: C03E107C
BCP2: C000000E
BCP3: F841F016
BCP4: 12B3A860
OSVer: 5_1_2006
SP: 3_0
Product: 768_1

I also found a box that said, "The following files will be included in this report."

...LOCALS~1\Temp\WERfd9d.dir00\Mini040509-01.dmp

...LOCALS~1\Temp\WERfd9d.dir00\sysdata.xml


I don't what the problem could be, I'm using the same video card and other hardware, except a different hard drive.

Thanks for any help.


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#1
April 5, 2009 at 16:07:43
"Since I didn't have much on the last hard drive, I didn't copy anything over but started fresh, and with a formatted drive."

You are a lot more likely to have problems with ACPI functions such as Suspend and Hibernate if you didn't load the main chipset drivers after Setup was finished.

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.


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#2
April 5, 2009 at 16:28:22
Searching using: BCCode : 7a
finds lots of "hits" but it doesn't seem to indicate any specific problem - it could be a ram problem, or a driver problem or whatever.
So, other than BCCode : 7a , I suspect the error string before BCP4 is unique to a particular system.

When you get an error message like you're getting, Windows often automatically makes a minidump file for the error event.
However the minidump file contents are not easily readable as is.
If you can still get into Windows, or if you can copy the minidump file and examine it's contents on another computer, there is often info in it that tells you exactly what your problem is - e.g. if it's a driver or other file that is the problem, it often names it in the minidump file.
However, if your problem is caused by a ram problem, there may be no specific info in it, and/or the minidump info may be different every time..

For what you need to examine the minidump file contents and what to look for go here:
http://apcmag.com/beat_those_bluesc...
.......

A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

For a laptop, you must remove both its main battery and AC adapter before you do that.
.......

If this is a desktop computer .....

You may have un-intentionally loosened or damaged something when you were installing the hard drive.
Unplug the case/power supply.
Power off your monitor.
Open up the case by removing the left panel as seen when you're looking at the front of the case.
Check all the connections of the wiring to make sure they are all the way onto their pins and into their sockets, especially the main connector from the power supply. The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle. Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

Some Dell cases have a latch you must push one way rather than screws you must remove at the back of the case.
.....

While you're in there, if the cpu fan/heatsink has mung (dust, lint, etc.) on it, clean it off, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc. It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan. If you have a case fan, clean that too if it needs it.
.....

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.
.....

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.


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#3
April 6, 2009 at 03:38:23
Thanks for the responses and I will try what has been posted. All of the motherboard and chipset drivers were installed after setup. I didn't notice this till now, but I had not installed the RAID controller drivers since I am not using multiple drivers or RAID. It don't think I installed them before either.

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Related Solutions

#4
April 6, 2009 at 08:34:50
"For what you need to examine the minidump file contents and what to look for go here:
http://apcmag.com/beat_those_bluesc...

Scroll down to:
To open a minidump file, you need the following tools:
.........

"I start the computer and eventually see a blue error screen that doesn't stay up long enough to look at. "

If you are able to get into Windows....

To have XP possibly display an error message you can investigate instead of the computer rebooting:

1. Click Start, and then right-click My Computer.
2. Click Properties.
3. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings under Startup and Recovery.
4. Under System failure, click on the small box beside Automatically restart to remove the checkmark.
5. Click OK, and then click OK.

If you then get an error message, look at all of it's details.

If you are not able to get into Windows....

Remove any bootable disks you have in optical drives.
Press F8 repeatedly while booting, don't hold down the key, and when the boot choices menu appears, try selecting
Disable automatic restart...
If you then get an error message, look at all of it's details.
.......

"Delete and Restore Data and continue with System Boot

or

Continue with Restore Data (which just does this same thing over and over)"

Those are not messages I'm familiar with. Did you load Windows from a regular Windows CD, or by using a Recovery or Restore disk or disk set set for a brand name system software installation?
........

"I had not installed the RAID controller drivers since I am not using multiple drivers or RAID."

Not loading those would not cause your problem.

Do you have a SATA hard drive?
If so, if the SATA drive controller chipset supports RAID, if you want the SATA drive to be in SATA mode, usually you must load the RAID drivers, which also support SATA mode, because the similar SATA only chipset drivers won't work with that chipset. You don't have to set up a RAID array (which you do BEFORE running Setup, and usually requires two or more drives) when you load RAID drivers, or set the bios settings for the SATA controller to RAID mode - you can use SATA mode instead.

When you have a SATA drive and a SATA drive controller that supports RAID, you usually have three choices in the mboard's bios Setup regarding the mode the SATA drive controllers are set to.
- IDE compatible mode, or similar
- SATA mode, or similar
- SATA RAID mode, or similar
If you want to know which labelling your bios uses for your mboard, I need to know the make and model of the mboard.

IDE compatible mode, or similar, allows Windows Setup run from a regular CD to see the SATA drive as equivallent to an IDE drive, but the max burst data transfer rate is then 133mb/sec.
SATA mode, or similar, or SATA RAID mode, or similar, has a max burst data transfer rate of 150 or 300mb/sec, but it requires drivers be loaded for the drive controller at the beginning of Windows Setup run from a regular CD by pressing F6, otherwise Setup can't see the SATA drive.
Setup will only find the controller drivers on a floppy disk in a floppy drive at that point in Setup. That can present a problem if you don't have a floppy drive, and only a few models of USB floppy drives are recognized, mostly models no longer available. Desktop mboards almost always have a floppy data cable header on the mboard, so you can temporarily hook up a floppy drive and install the SATA controller drivers from a floppy from that, but you don't have that choice with newer laptops.
One way of getting around that is to make a slipstreamed CD with the contents of your Windows CD with the SATA controller drivers integrated into it - if you do that you might as well integrate the SP3 updates into it as well if your Windows CD doesn't have them.
The other, easier, way is to install Windows when the SATA controllers in the bios are in IDE compatible mode, or similar, and install the SATA mode, or similar, or SATA RAID mode, or similar, drivers later.

Many mboard manufacturers and brand name system builders set the SATA controller mode in the bios to IDE compatibility mode to simplify installing Windows from a regular CD. If you want the SATA drive in SATA mode, or similar, or SATA RAID mode, or similar, you can load the drivers for the SATA controller chipset after Setup has finished, then change the SATA controller mode in the bios Setup to SATA mode, or similar, or SATA RAID mode, or similar.



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#5
April 7, 2009 at 21:57:44
The problem was a jumper and maybe the place on the cable the hard drive was at. I have two hard drives but was messing around and I hooked only one up, with the jumper on slave. It was also on the slave position of the EIDE cable.

Thanks for the replies.


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#6
April 8, 2009 at 07:11:40
As long as the right connector on a three connector IDE data cable is plugged into the mboard - often the blue one or in any case the one farther from the middle connector - when you use master/slave jumpering it doesn't matter which of the other two connectors on the cable you connect the drive to - it only matters if you use cable select jumpering, in which case the drive on the middle connector is seen as slave, the drive on the end one is seen as master.

On older mboards a drive jumpered as or seen as slave may not be seen by the bios at all when it is by itself on a data cable.
On newer mboards, the drive is usually recognized anyway in the same situation, but it's not recommended you leave it jumpered as or seen as slave because some software expects a single drive on a data cable to be jumpered as or seen as master.
However, I've never heard of anyone having problems coming out of Hibernate mode or getting the BCCode: 7a error etc. when the drive was working fine otherwise.


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