no signal after startup

Gateway Gateway 506gr intel pentium 4 3....
August 9, 2009 at 19:38:11
Specs: WIndows XP, Gateway 2GB RAM
I just hooked up my desktop to my new HDTV via
VGA.

It was working fine for a day, even with restarting it.
Then, I put it in standby, then an hour later, touched
the mouse to turn it back on, it seemed to go back on
but the tv was getting "No Signal."

I rebooted the computer manually pressing buttons on
the tower a few times -- still no signal. What can I do?
It seems to be still having some kind of weird hang up
from that standby that i can't break.....


See More: no signal after startup

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#1
August 9, 2009 at 20:41:57
Standby often doesn't work properly if you haven't loaded the main chipset drivers for your mboard.

Windows by default usually only loads one display. You usually must enable the second display (the VGA to the HDTV in this case) in Display Properties - Settings, after RIGHT clicking on the disabled display. In any case, if Standby isn't working properly, you may lose the enabling of that second display after the computer goes into Standby.

If the original Gateway software installation is still on the computer, the correct main chipset drivers are already installed.

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

Standby (and Hibernate, and sometimes Shut Down, and Restart), is often only properly supported via the proper ACPI support info for the mboard.

If the correct main chipset drivers HAVE been installed and you still have this problem, then your problem is probably the second display is disabled after going into Standby because of the video drivers - you may be able to cure that by getting newer video drivers - if not you'll just have to enable the second display after the computer goes into Standby, or just not use Standby - e.g. your Power options in Control Panel can be set to power off the monitor or laptop display and/or the hard drive after x minutes.
......


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#2
August 10, 2009 at 06:22:55
Thanks! I should give a bit more information.

The XP that is installed on it is straight off of the recovery
disk that came with the system, I recently reformatted the
hard drive.

The VGA is coming out of the graphics card I have, which is
a NVIDIA GEforce 8500 GT I believe. It was working fine
until standby, like I said.

I tried plugging it into the VGA port that comes standard on
the motherboard but that didnt work either. However to make
it work maybe I had to take out the graphics card?

At any rate I don't even see how I could get back into the
computer since I can't seem to find a way to get a display
out of it. I have another monitor with a VGA and mini DV
connection, would that help?

Right now I feel like there's no way to get a signal output
even if I wanted to change settings internally on the OS.

Thanks for you help!


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#3
August 10, 2009 at 08:14:53
"The XP that is installed on it is straight off of the recovery
disk that came with the system, I recently reformatted the
hard drive"

If Gateway has the same situation as I've seen with more recent Dell, HP, and Compaq computers that have XP Home or Pro on them, it came with a "recovery disk" (that may not be the actual label) that is actually a slightly modified regular OEM XP CD - it has the \i386 folder and several other standard XP CD folders - almost all the files are identical to those on a regular XP CD. If it's a CD, not a DVD, it doesn't have enough capacity to re-load all the software that came with the system. That CD probably does not load the main chipset drivers or the drivers for devices for the system a regular OEM XP CD does not have the drivers for, and it certainly does not load any associated software for the devices.
In that case, you must install the main chipset drivers after Setup has finished, as well as any drivers and associated software for the system that Windows didn't find automatically.
In the case of a HP laptop computer, it also came with a DVD "Drivers and Applications DVD" which you use to install main chipset and other needed drivers and the extra HP supplied software programs that came with the system, and a CD that installs a software feature on the second partition, rather than the second partition being a Recovery partition that has all the data needed to re-load the C partition.
It usually does no harm at all if you install the main chipset drivers again even if they've already been installed - they may or may not be available in the downloads for your specific model on the Gateway web site, asI said above

"The VGA is coming out of the graphics card I have, which is
a NVIDIA GEforce 8500 GT I believe. It was working fine
until standby, like I said.

I tried plugging it into the VGA port that comes standard on
the motherboard but that didnt work either. However to make
it work maybe I had to take out the graphics card?"

OK, so sounds like this is a desktop computer.
In most cases when you install an AGP or PCI-E card in a slot, the onboard video is automatically disabled by the bios, and all settings to do with the onboard video in the bios such as the amount ofram shared with it are ignored by the bios.

You could try removing the card (remove the AC power to the case whenever you fiddle with any card or ram or connections inside the case) and connecting the monitor to the onboard video port, but that may not help.
.....

The first part of your first post probably had a cause that I mentioned in response 1 (assuming the power supply had NOT malfunctioned).

I have probably mis-interpreted the second part of your post. I was assuming your problem was the connection to the TV, only, was not working after the computer had gone into Standby and you had re-booted.
If you are getting no video at all now, that's a different situation. In that case, the no video message, if you get that or similar, is probably generated by your monitor, not the mboard or Windows.
If the monitor is getting no video signal, the led on it is the standby color - often yellow or orange - rather than green or whatever color when it is getting a video signal.
Does the hard drive led seem to be blinking like it normally does while booting and loading Windows?
Does the hard drive and fan(s) spin? Are all the leds working, including, probably, one on the mboard?
Have you changed which ram you have installed sincethecomputer last worked fine?

Since you have installed a card in a slot, that may be directly related to your problem, if it was installed fairly recently. Brand name systems often have a power supply that has enough capacity to handle a very modest video card being installed, but it often does not have enough capacity to handle a video card that requires more power. If that's your case, typically, the system will work with the card anyway at first, but the PS is overloaded 100% of the time the computer is running when the video card isinstalled and eventually it will malfunction and fail.
If the PS is already malfuctioning or has failed, it's likely the system won't have video even if you remove the video card and connect the monitor to the onboard video port.
....

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
You can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements.

.........

FYI -

I searched using: nVidia 8500GT minimum watts amps

Most "hits" say something like this:

Requirements
Minimum of a 300 Watt power supply.
(Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 18 Amps.)

The PS must meet or exceed both specs.

Some "hits" say 350 watts minimum.
......

In addition, failing or dead power supplies are common in any case.

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
They often partially work, fans and hard drives may spin, leds may come on, yet you may get no video and the mboard will not boot all the way.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If it is failing, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

If you have or can borrow a used known good power supply that has enough capacity, try connecting that before buying anything. You don't need to install it in the case for testing purposes - just prop it up beside the case and connect it.

If the mboard has an additional socket (often 4 "pin") for a power connection other than the main 20 or 24 "pin" one, make sure you connect the PS to that.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...



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Related Solutions

#4
August 10, 2009 at 08:40:15
Thanks!!!!

I've actually had the video card in there for over a year and it
has always worked fine. And, as I said, I was using it and it
was fine while hooked up via VGA to my HDTV. I put it in
standby... an hour later woke it up with the mouse... and
there was no signal... which makes me think it is directly
related to standby rather than a failure of the graphics card or
fan or something.

When I turn the computer back on it seems to be booting
normally... however I was noticing that it didn't seem to be
hitting the hard drive as much as usual (via looking at the
blinking yellow LED) while booting. But who knows.

But my basic observation is that it seems to be restarting
normally but just with no signal being the read on the TV.
And this HDTV is brand new. And was working with the
computer right before the standby, so i highly doubt its the
tv....


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#5
August 10, 2009 at 09:21:13
..which makes me think it is directly related to standby rather than a failure of the graphics card or fan or something.

You hit the bulleye. Unless your computer is a laptop, there is no advantage to use Standeby & Hibernate features on a desktop. The purpose of Standby & hibernate is to conserve laptop battery life. As an FYI Click on the link below to see how many problems it caused on the desktops.

http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/xp_...

i_Xp/VistaUser


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#6
August 10, 2009 at 09:38:46
That makes tons of sense.

So, in prmosing I'll never use hibernate again :) , what can I do
to get it back on track where it was prior to standby?


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#7
August 10, 2009 at 09:44:08
"I've actually had the video card in there for over a year and it
has always worked fine."

Was this the first time you had VGA hooked up to the HDTV and the computer went into Standby??
If it wasn't, did that work properly before you re-loaded the computer with the "Recovery" CD?

Power supplies can malfunction or fail at any time in any case - there's always that possibility when your system isn't working normally.

The power supply probably has a label on it that states the max. watts and the amps rating at +12v as well as other amps ratings - some PSs have two +12v output ratings - in that case you add the two together. Sometimes you have to remove the PS to find the label because it's where you can't see it.
If it's rated at less than 300 watts and/or less than 18 amps at +12v, the PS may be failing despite the fact it apparently works now at least partially and it worked for a year after the card was installed. Some el-cheapo PSs are well known to be more likely to malfunction and/or fail - if you tell me which brand it is, I may be able to determine if it's one of those. E.g. BESTEC is a well known to be bad one.

As I said above...
"If the monitor is getting no video signal, the led on it is the standby color - often yellow or orange - rather than green or whatever color when it is getting a video signal."

When you reboot or shut off and then boot a computer, I know of no situation where it would not come out of Standby automatically, so although your computer seemed to be stuck in Standby mode after it went into Standby and the monitors standby led color is appropriate for that, it should NOT still be that color - in that case, something else is wrong.

"When I turn the computer back on it seems to be booting
normally... however I was noticing that it didn't seem to be
hitting the hard drive as much as usual (via looking at the
blinking yellow LED) while booting. "

Most people don't pay much attention to that while booting when the computer is working fine - what you are seeing now may or may not be what you would normally see. Do you have to Logon to Windows normally? If so, the HD activity led will stop blinking shortly after that point comes in the booting into Windows process, if you don't select anything (e.g. press Enter) or type a password on the keyboard.

I'm assuming you have both a computer monitor and the HDTV VGA connection connected ti the video card in the slot for all of this.
You STILL haven't said so specifically, but if you are getting no video at all now, on the monitor, that's NOT normal.

As I said above....
"You could try removing the card (remove the AC power to the case whenever you fiddle with any card or ram or connections inside the case) and connecting the monitor to the onboard video port, but that may not help."

If you are getting no video at all now on the computer monitor, the most likely thing is your power supply is failing.


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#8
August 10, 2009 at 09:48:46
But why would my power supply all the sudden stop working
just because of the standby?

Sorry about not being clear..... when I turn the computer on I
get NO picture at all. It just has no signal. So I can't boot it in
safe mode or any of that stuff. I turn it on it starts booting, but I
can never see anything anymore after that one standby.....

re: the other questions... this IS the first time ive put it in standby since hooking it to the HDTV... but I reformatted it like 2 months ago, and its been fine since with the regular computer monitor I have....it's just this one standby event that has seemed to mes with my video output....


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#9
August 10, 2009 at 09:51:06
..what can I do to get it back on track where it was prior to standby?

Not easy unless you created full backup image of the whole drive. Windows System restore will not help as it cares only about files essential to the operating system and nothing for user's configuration. I guess you may need to redo the HDTV to VGA configuration setup.

i_Xp/VistaUser


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#10
August 10, 2009 at 10:04:21
So putting it in standby actually corrupted the hardware linking
the graphics card to the HDTV?

I didnt do any configuration initially when I set it up. the TV has
a vga input so i just plugged it in like a monitor and off it
went.....

Was actual damage done?


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#11
August 10, 2009 at 10:14:09
"But why would my power supply all the sudden stop working
just because of the standby?"

Power supplies can malfunction or fail completely at any time.

"Sorry about not being clear..... when I turn the computer on I
get NO picture at all. It just has no signal. So I can't boot it in
safe mode or any of that stuff. I turn it on it starts booting, but I
can never see anything anymore after that one standby....."

I'm assuming you DO NOT have the monitor pluuged into the onboasrd VGA port - you'll probably get no video from that.

As I said above....
"You could try removing the card (remove the AC power to the case whenever you fiddle with any card or ram or connections inside the case) and connecting the monitor to the onboard video port, but that may not help."

The most likely thing is your power supply is failing.
See the info about that above - in response 3.

As I said in that....
"If you have or can borrow a used known good power supply that has enough capacity, try connecting that before buying anything. You don't need to install it in the case for testing purposes - just prop it up beside the case and connect it. "

If you don't have that option, since the PS has not failed completely, there's a very good chance in your case that installing a new (or good used) power supply will cure your problem. If the PS was not working at all sometimes it has damaged the mboard and the system won't work properly even after you try another PS it should work with.

"If the mboard has an additional socket (often 4 "pin") for a power connection other than the main 20 or 24 "pin" one, make sure you connect the PS to that."

Note that your mboard can have a 20 or a 24 "pin" main power socket. Most power supplies that can connect to a 24 "pin" main socket have a connector that has two pieces - a 20 "pin" piece, and a 4 "pin" piece, NOT a one piece 24 "pin" piece. The 4 "pin" piece slides onto or clips onto the 20 "pin" piece - if it is attached the main connector appears to be one piece. Each piece will only install in one place in the main socket on the mboard, no where else on the mboard, because of the shapes of the plastic on the connector and in the mboard socket around the pins.


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#12
August 10, 2009 at 10:39:44
"..what can I do to get it back on track where it was prior to standby?"

There's probably nothing wrong with your data on the hard drive. You should have video even when no drives at all are installed if nothing else were wrong.

"So putting it in standby actually corrupted the hardware linking
the graphics card to the HDTV?"

Software problems do NOT cause your computer to have no video at all. Even if you do have software proiblems in Windows you should have video on your monitor before Windows starts to load. They could cause no video to the HDTV, but not to the monitor, in the first part of booting.
Power supplies can malfunction or fail completely at any time.

"I didnt do any configuration initially when I set it up. the TV has
a vga input so i just plugged it in like a monitor and off it
went....."

Your video card won't work as it was designed to until at least the specific drivers have been installed for it. As far as I know, XP has no built in support or drivers for the 8500GT chipset, and it certainly doesn't have any built in HD video or HDTV support, whatever SP updates have been installed. If that's your case, Windows is running it in a standard VGA mode of one sort or another (you can see what that is in Device Manager - Display Adapters) , and the enhanced capabilities of the card are NOT being used. You probably must load the specific software to support the HDTV being connected to graphics card properly - that's another possible reason the VGA video didn't work on the HDTV after the computer went into Standby.
However, that will NOT cause you to have no video before Windows loads, or after it loads, on the monitor, if nothing else is wrong in Windows.

"Was actual damage done?"

By any software - extremely unlikely.
By the PS starting to fail - maybe, but probably not since it's still partially working.
.......

Other possibilities that could cause no video at all.

If the video card isn't seated properly, it's possible you could get no video from both the card and the onboard video port.

Make sure the nVidiavideo card is all the way down in it's slot and that the screw that fastens it down is installed. If in doubt, unplug it, plug it in again, ONLY when the AC power to the case has been removed.
......

You may have a problem with the connection of the ram to the ram slots. However, in that case, the hard drive probably would do nothing or very little while booting.

A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).
This usually happens a long time after the ram was installed, but it can happen with new ram, or after moving the computer case from one place to another, and I've had even new modules that needed to have their contacts cleaned.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
......

If you have changed which ram you have installed since the computer last worked correctly, not all ram is 100% compatible with your mboard, and that will cause problems. However, if incomptible ram is the problem, usually either you still have video, or you do not and the computer's mboard does not boot fully at all - e.g. little or no HD activity shown by it's led.
.....



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#13
August 10, 2009 at 10:54:02
Funny because I just replaced the power supply a year and a
half ago. Maybe it was a bit longer than that....

this is my computer:
http://support.gateway.com/s//PC/R/...

Is there a certain type of power supply i need to buy for this
computer? I guess I'll get a 350 watt. But what about
connectors and size?

i want to make sure I buy the right kind of power supply,
since I have no one to borrow from


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#14
August 10, 2009 at 11:53:55
Now I know you might have a PCI-E X16 GT8500 card.

Note that some PCI-E (and AGP) video cards have an extra power socket a wiring connector from the PS connects to. If your card has that it MUST be connected!
Most new and more recent power supplies already have that wiring connector.
..........

Things to try....
With the AC power to the case removed...
try re-seating the video card and the ram.

If that doesn't help, with the AC power to the case removed...
try removing the card and using the onboard video port.

If that doesn't help it's probably the PS.
.......

From info at your link:

Unlike the fairly recent Dell, HP, and Compaq computers I have worked on, your hard drive originally had a Recovery partition.
It isn't clear whether you had to make the proper Recovery CD yourself by using a Gateway supplied program - probably - many people neglect to do that - or whether it also came with one or more Recovery disks - probably not.
If you did the Full Recovery procedure with the proper single Recovery CD, and DID NOT delete the second partition before you ran it, of if you installed from a Recovery CD SET, then your system has had all the software installed that was installed on C originally, including main chipset drivers and other drivers necessary for your system, including for the Intel HD Audio.

Power Supplies
102015 - 300-Watt Power Supply.

So the original PS was 300 watts.

One thing I forgot to mention is the GT8500 chipset cards may be availble in AGP 8X, PCI-E X16, and possibly PCI card versions.
The PCI-E versions tend to use a bit more power for the same chipset than the AGP or PCI versions do, so 350watts is probably a better minimum capacity for your situation.

Note that some PCI-E (and AGP) video cards have an extra power socket a wiring connector from the PS connects to. If your card has that it MUST be connected!

" ...I just replaced the power supply a year and a
half ago. Maybe it was a bit longer than that...."

What brand, model, and capacity?

In any case, power supplies can malfunction or fail completely at any time. Better brands are a lot less likely to damage anything else when they malfunction or fail completely. .
.......

A new standard ATX PS will probably have all the necessary connectors on it's wiring, and maybe some you won't need.
Which connectors it comes with are usually stated in it's ad, or can be looked up on the manufacturer's web site. Their appearance isusually shown on the manufacturer's web site.

You can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

You can get one that has a greater capacity than 350 watts if you like.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Personally I usually buy Enermax PSs locally because they're cheaper than Antec ones where I am, but that may be more expensive than you're willing to pay. No Enermax PS I've bought for myself or for others has ever malfunctioned or failed. Only one person I know ever had a problem with the more expensive Antec ones (they now have a cheaper series - shorter warranty - and a more expensive series, used to be the only one - longer warranty) and it did no harm to the system and was replaced no problem on warranty.

Note that your mboard can have a 20 or a 24 "pin" main power socket. Most power supplies that can connect to a 24 "pin" main socket have a connector that has two pieces - a 20 "pin" piece, and a 4 "pin" piece, NOT a one piece 24 "pin" piece. The 4 "pin" piece slides onto or clips onto the 20 "pin" piece - if it is attached the main connector appears to be one piece. Each piece will only install in one place in the main socket on the mboard, no where else on the mboard, because of the shapes of the plastic on the connector and in the mboard socket around the pins.

If the mboard has an additional socket (often 4 "pin") for a power connection other than the main 20 or 24 "pin" one, make sure you connect the PS to that."

Your mboard probably has that extra socket.


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#15
August 10, 2009 at 12:53:56
Thanks for all your help!

I am going to try everything else now to see if it is indeed the
power supply or not. If so, I guess I'll buy one and try it out.

I appreciate the help! Will update here when I get it figured out
later on today.


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#16
August 10, 2009 at 16:14:04
Well, it's fixed?

Wasn't a power supply problem I guess.

But... I have no idea WHAT the problem was. I just took
everything apart and then put it back together again and it
started working. I don't get it

thanks!


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#17
August 10, 2009 at 20:09:02
We're glad to hear you got it to work again.
Maybe the card or the ram wasn't all the way down in it's slot, or the ram had developed an iffy connection??

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