New OEM XP SP3 Will Not Install

New / HOME BUILD
January 10, 2009 at 08:57:58
Specs: Windows XP, Intel Core 2 Quad Q6700/2G Corsair XMS2 DDR2 Ram
I have finished building the PC. Trying to install Win XP SP3 using a brand new OEM XP SP3 install disk now. I bought the XP disk from TigerDirect.com, and it came still wrapped in plastic.

Every time I have tried to install XP, it will go through checking my system. It will successfully create a partition. It will reboot, then try to continue the install.

At this point, the install shows an error stating "One of the components windows needs could not be installed". "A component's file does not match the verification information present in the component manifest".

When I click "OK" the error log comes up and shows the error of "ERROR SXS.DLL: Syntax error in manifest policy file "D:\i386\asms\io\msft\windows\gdiplus\gdiplus.man" On line 4

I have tried using a different CD drive from my old computer and it gives the same error at the exact same spot. Any ideas? Thanks.


See More: New OEM XP SP3 Will Not Install

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#1
January 10, 2009 at 09:46:47
Google that error. There were over 28,000 hits.

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#2
January 10, 2009 at 12:42:41
The most common cause of errors like you're getting is Setup is either having a problem reading from the CD, or Setup is experiencing errors reading the ram, and because of that, having a problem reading from the CD.

You should not get ANY errors reading files that are on the original ("pressed"; CDROM - read only - CD) Windows CD - if you made only one partition on a new or blank hard drive, or choose to start over and make only one on an existing hard drive, or if you don't alter the partition(s) and there is only one partition on the existing hard drive, the optical drive you have the Windows CD in is assigned the logical letter D, if there are no other hard drives installed that already have partitions on them Windows recognizes.

If you DO get errors reading the files on the original CD, it usually happens AFTER you have successfully created a partitions on a drive.
You will probably find that if you choose to Skip loading a file you're getting an error about in Setup, you will then get other errors about loading other files, many files, one after the other, if you Skip loading those too.

Usually there is nothing actually wrong with the original CD - the problem lies elsewhere, and the error messages about a file (or files) not being found or it's corrupted are FALSE.
However....
if the Windows CD you are using is a COPY of an original Windows CD, it should work fine if the disk is CD-R, but it MAY NOT read properly if it is a CD-RW or other type of burnable disk that was not made in the drive it is being read in.
....

If you DO get errors reading the files on the original ("pressed") CD........

It is extremely unlikely there is anything wrong with the original ("pressed") CD itself.

In your case, the fact that you get reading errors with two different Windows CDs [if they are both original ("pressed") CDs] reinforces the probability that something else is wrong.

Windows Setup is VERY sensitive to errors reading from the CD. If you are having problems reading from the CD, it is often because of the CD being dirty, or because of a problem with the optical drive you have it in and/or it's data cable connection to the mboard.
- make sure the Windows CD is clean
- the laser lens may be dirty if the optical drive has been used previously - try a laser lens cleaning CD in the drive.
- if you have two optical drives, try it in the other drive, but be aware that some bioses will only boot a bootable CD from the first optical drive listed in the bios Setup - they are either listed in the boot order, or there is a separate list of the optical drives in the bios, often near the boot order list - the optical drive you want to boot a bootable CD from must be listed first in such a bios - they are often listed by their model numbers.

- if the optical drive is IDE.....
It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.
....

If the optical drive is IDE and is a DVD combo burner (reads and burns both CDs and DVDs) and is capable of burning DVD -R or DVD +R CDs at 16X or greater, it is capable of max UDMA 66 data transfer speeds and it MUST be connected to the IDE header on the mboard by means of an 80 wire data cable in order for it to work properly.
..............

If the optical drive is SATA....

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)
...........

Windows Setup is VERY sensitive to errors reading from the ram, even when there are only a tiny amount of errors you may not have noticed previously.

Contrary to popular belief, having actual BAD ram is extremely RARE!
When you do have a problem reading the ram, it's many times more likely to be because the computer has a problem with the reliabilty of the connection of the ram to the slots it's in, or you are are trying to use ram that is NOT 100% compatible with your mboard.

A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).
This usually happens a long time after the ram was installed, but it can happen with new ram, or after moving the computer case from one place to another, and I've had even new modules that needed to have their contacts cleaned.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

....

The ram you are using MUST be compatible with the mboard main chipset, or on some more recent mboards with certain cpus, must be compatible with the memory controller that is built into the cpu.

See response 5 in this for some info about ram compatibilty, and some places where you can find out what will work in your mboard for sure:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
Correction to that:
Mushkin www.mushkin.com

Once you know which module ID strings work in your mboard, you can get them from anywhere you like that has ram with those ID strings.

If you have brand name ram, it is usually easy to look up whether it's ID string is in a list of compatible modules found by using your mboard or brand name system model number.
If the ram is generic, that may be difficult or impossible.
....

If you do a ram test, do that AFTER having tried cleaning the contacts and making sure the ram is seated properly - otherwise any errors found may be FALSE.
If the ram is incompatible with the chipset, it will likely FAIL a ram test - that is NOT a true indication of the ram being faulty - there is probably nothing wrong with it, and it will pass the test if installed in a mboard it is compatible with.
If a ram test DOES find errors, if you have more than one module installed, try the test with one module at a time - sometimes they won't work properly when more than one is installed, but it will pass when by itself.


If you want to try a memory diagnostic utility that takes a lot less time to run a full pass than memtest86 does, this one is pretty good - Microsoft's
Windows Memory Diagnostic:
http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag...
It can be toggled to do a standard or a more comprehensive set of tests - use the default 6 test one first - if it passes one pass of that, use the latter one. A few of the tests in the latter set are intentionally slower.


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#3
January 10, 2009 at 13:31:56
"I have finished building the PC"

Let's start with that. Are you an experienced builder? Did you manually configure the BIOS or are you simply running the defaults?

As Tubes said above, memory *may* be the issue. You should ALWAYS test the RAM to confirm it's good BEFORE attempting to install the OS. Also as he said, bad RAM is rare, but it does happen.

Since the Q6700 is a 1066MHz FSB CPU, you should be running the RAM at 533MHz DDR (266MHz actual) regardless of the fact that you may have DDR2-667, DDR2-800, etc. And be sure the RAM voltage is set correctly. Some boards default to 1.8v but much of the gaming RAM out there these days requires anywhere from 1.9v - 2.1v. Check the label on your RAM, set the voltage accordingly, then run memtest86 or memtest86+:

http://www.memtest86.com/download.html

http://www.memtest.org/


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Related Solutions

#4
January 10, 2009 at 20:39:13
Thanks for the quick, and very thorough responses, I appreciate it. I will go through each suggestion given by tubesandwires to try and eliminate the problem.

As far as the BIOS settings jam mentioned, I will have to re-check those. I will post all results I get from the RAM testing and the BIOS settings tomorrow.


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#5
January 23, 2009 at 04:09:24
Sorry, been busy. I have tried several different paths to try and remedy this problem. The PC will still not install XP.

1. Tested the RAM using the Microsoft memory tool. Tested both sticks together, passed the first 6 tests, and also passed the more thorough 11 tests. Tried one stick at a time in each slot. All tests passed, no errors found for the RAM.

2. Tried copying a new gdiplus.dll file onto the hard drive. I couldn't figure out how to do that since there is no OS on the PC yet. Remember, this is a brand new build. I am trying to install XP on it as the OS.

3. Ordered and received a brand new copy of WIN XP SP3 OEM install disk. The disk fails the same way as the original disk.

4. Aha! I found that the RAM I was trying to install was actually NOT compatible with the MSI P6NGM motherboard I have. YAY Right?!?! Wrong!

5. After receiving brand new RAM that I verified was absolutely compatible, I installed the new RAM. SAME ERROR! Same place, right after the PC reboots and tries to continue with the XP install.

6. Replaced the IDE cable from the DVD/R+W to the motherboard with a known good IDE cable. Still not working.

7. Tested the NEW RAM using the memtest tool. Of course both sticks passed all tests.

8. Tried using a known good Optical reader instead of the DVD/R+W. Same failure, same place.

Any further help would be great. I am about to start using the big hammer on it at this point.


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#6
January 23, 2009 at 11:53:13
So - your Windows CD and ram probably isn't the problem. Which optical drive you use MIGHT be.

If it wasn't clear previously, if (a) ram module(s) part number is NOT in a list of modules listed when you look up the modules specifically for your mboard on the module manufacturer's or major ram ditributor's web site, or if you can't look the part number because the ram is generic or has an oddball part number, if the ram passes a memory test when more than one module is installed, it will work fine in your system, despite the fact you can't find any info about it being compatible.
I emphasive looking up which ram is listed for your mboard (is compatible) BEFORE you buy it, in order for you to avoid possibly having to go through the hassle of returning it if it doesn't work properly in your mboard. If you buy ram randomly it MIGHT be compatible, but why take a chance. If you've already bought it, or if you are trying ram you already have, if it passes a memory test it will work fine.

If the original ram tested fine, there was probably no need to get ram that WAS listed somewhere.
The ram that IS listed should work fine in any case.

BUT - see the end of this post, starting at "Your ram may not be detected properly....."

Also
- some places where you look up ram default to showing you only some of the modules - you have to click on something to have them show all of the modules that will work with that mboard. E.g. the Corsair? web site.
- rarely, there are ommisions in the listings, or for a ram distributor they may not have all the possible modules in stock and don't list the ones that aren't, or, sometimes, they are no longer making some of the modules and don't list them for that reason, but you might be using one of those discontinued ones e.g. even if the ram is new you might have bought them from a place that still has them in stock. e.g. the Kingston site often has a link that will allow the older modules they no longer make to be listed as well.
If you look up a different mboard model that uses the same main chipset, the listings may be slightly different, but you can be sure any of the ones listed will also work in your mboard.
......

"Replaced the IDE cable from the DVD/R+W to the motherboard with a known good IDE cable."

Is it an 80 wire data cable? If it requires one and you are using a 40 wire data cable, you are likely to have problems. The extra wires prevent data errors when a drive is capable of UDMA 66 speeds or faster.
As I said above....
"If the optical drive is IDE and is a DVD combo burner (reads and burns both CDs and DVDs) and is capable of burning DVD -R or DVD +R CDs at 16X or greater, it is capable of max UDMA 66 data transfer speeds and it MUST be connected to the IDE header on the mboard by means of an 80 wire data cable in order for it to work properly."

In addition to an 80 wire data cable obiously having more wires
- the connector on one end of the data cable is blue - that connector MUST plug into the mboard, or into a controller card in a card slot.
- DO NOT mix CS (Cable Select) and Master/Slave (MS, SL, or similar) jumpering on the same data cable if two drives are connected to it - use one or the other
- DO NOT jumper a single drive on a data cable as slave, or if you use cable select jumpering DO NOT connect a single drive to the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable (which designates it as slave when you use CS) - older mboards/bioses won't detect the drive at all; more recent mboards/bioses often detect the drive anyway, but certain software, possibly including Windows Setup, will not work properly in some situations.
- if you do have a hard drive on the same data cable, some hard drives (e.g. some Western Digital models) must be jumpered differently as master if there is a second drive (jumpered as slave) on the same data cable.
..........

By the way, it is NOT wise to make just one partition if you have a single hard drive. You should make at least TWO. The first one is all Setup is concerned about - any other ones you can partition and format later after Setup is finished. You DO NOT have to install most programs you install yourself on C when you have the choice - you can use the Custom install, and/or change the drive letter of the location to other than C - in that case only a little is installed on C, the vast majority of it is installed on the other partition. You can load documents, music, movies, videos, etc. on any partition.
The goal is to load stuff on other partitions that you don't want to lose if you have to run Setup from scratch which wipes out the existing contents of the partition Windows was installed on, which is usually C:, but doesn't wipe the contents of other partitions if they are present, unless you deliberately choose to, or if you wipe the entire hard drive contents when you have more than one partition, which usually is not necessary.
....

I looked up your error messages. By the way, the first one is missing some words. If you search using the exact error message wording, with or without quotes around it, you often get more "hits" that have useful info.

Apparently

- this is not a XP SP3 original CD ONLY problem. It also happens with original XP SP2 CDs.

- this happens with SOME systems, or when you have SOME components, but only a small percentage of them.

- I have not tried a XP with SP3 updates CD yet, but I have installed XP on at least a half dozen systems, that had both older and recent mboards, in the last while using slipstreamed CDs that were made from original XP CDs without any SP updates, or from original XP CDs with SP1 updates, that had the SP2 updates integrated into them, or the SP2 updates and then the SP3 updates integrated into them, or the SP3 updates integrated into them, and I have had no problems with Setup. On most of those, the drive I had the slipstreamed Windows CD-R disk in was a regular CD-rom (only) drive.

- a lot of people had problems because of one of the things I have already pointed out. If you are using an 80 wire cable and have the drive jumpered properly and connected to the right connector if you're using cable select, then that probably doesn't apply to your case.

- was the hard drive new and blank, or is it one that had data on it that you wiped??
If the latter, a few report you may have to re-write the mbr (master boot record) on the drive. E.g. You can do that by booting up using a 98SE or ME Startup floppy disk and typing fdisk /mbr (press Enter).
Or - you can do that by booting from a bootable floppy or CD that has the drive manufacturer's free drive preparation program.

- some report that you DO NOT always get a message about the problem with the same file.
Is the message always about gdiplus.man?

- it seems it happens much more often if you have the Windows CD in a burner drive. Many cured the problem by using a a different optical drive model, or the most often mentioned thing that worked, a plain CDRom (only) drive to run Setup from.

- some were successful when they removed all cards in slots and devices they have plugged in that are not essential while running Setup.
If the mboard has onboard video and you have a graphics card in a slot, try removing the card and connecting the monitor to the onboard video port instead.
If you have an IDE hard drive you are trying to install Windows on, and an IDE optical drive, try connecting both to the same data cable, on the Primary IDE header, while running Setup.

- if you can't try another optical drive, or if all of the models you try produce the error, you can copy the contents of the \i386 folder on the CD to C on the partitioned and formatted hard drive, and run Setup from that folder.

e.g.
Windows XP Setup Cannot Continue
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/812247

This issue may occur if Setup cannot correctly read files from the Windows XP CD.

It tells you how to copy the contents of the i386 folder on the CD to the hard drive.

Then you run Setup from the \i386 folder - since the files are already on the hard drive, Setup works because it finds the files are already there.

If you don't have a Microsoft Windows Millennium Edition (Me) or Microsoft Windows 98 Startup disk, you can get it off the web, e.g. at www.bootdisk.com

Even if your system does not have a floppy drive, the mboard almost always has the floppy data cable header - if so, borrow a floppy drive and data cable if you need to - you may need to enable the detection of the floppy drive, and enable booting from the floppy drive in your bios setup by placing it first in the boot order (In all the bioses I've tried it in, a bootable floppy is NOT recognized while booting if it's listed after a CD drive in the boot order, The CD drive DOES NOT have to be listed first - it just must be listed before all hard drives. Some bioses will only boot a bootable CD from the first optical drive listed in the bios Setup if you have more than one installed).

OR you should be able to boot from a bootable USB drive with an operating system on it, if the bios Setup boot order settings are set to allow that (if not USB drive, removable drive?).

Once you have the contents of \i386 (I386) on the drive partition you want to be C,
then execute \i386\winnt.exe to run Setup.
(e.g.
boot with the Win 98SE or ME startup floppy.
type: C: (press enter)
If it doesn't show C:\> (no subfolders)
type: cd .. (press Enter) as many times as it takes until it shows C:\> (no subfolders)
type: cd\i386 (press Enter)
type: winnt.exe (press Enter)
remove the floppy or USB drive or whatever after Setup completes the first stage and is going to reboot the computer, before the computer boots again. DO NOT boot from the Windows CD, or the floppy or whatever, after the first stage of Setup is complete and the computer reboots - let Setup continue on it's own until it's finished.)


- some insist the problem is caused by a file on the CD that is corrupt - CONTROLS.MAN - if so, why do most people have no problems installing Windows XP SP2 or XP SP3 CDs?? - is it only a prblem if you have certain hardware??

e.g. http://www.annoyances.org/exec/foru...

Excerpts:


"Controls.man is a XML file responsible for registring the common controls in Windows (e.g. buttons, message boxes)

You can also copy and paste the content of the file below:

[Content of Controls.man]

ToolbarWindow32
ComboBoxEx32
msctls_trackbar32
msctls_updown32
msctls_progress32
msctls_hotkey32
msctls_statusbar32
SysHeader32
SysListView32
SysTreeView32
SysTabControl32
SysIPAddress32
SysPager
NativeFontCtl
Button
Static
Listbox
ScrollBar
SysLink
tooltips_class32
ButtonListBox
SysAnimate32
SysMonthCal32
SysDateTimePick32
ReBarWindow32
Edit
Combobox
ComboLBox

[End of content]
Paste the data above into Notepad and save as CONTROLS.MAN. If there are html tags in your pasting, remove them. Hope this helps! "

- you would need to copy that to the right location
C:\I386\ASMS\6000\MSFT\WINDOWS\COMMON\CONTROLS
.................

Less likely.

- it can happen if you have previously undetected problems on the hard drive, especially if it's used.

When the drive has no data on it yet, you can...

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, you're fine.
- If it finds problems but they don't warrant making a claim against the warranty, if it asks if you want to repair the problem, answer yes. If that's successful, you're fine, but you will probably have to make one or more partitions again and format them when you run Setup again.
- If it says there is a serious physical error or a major problem, and the drive should be RMAed or similar, many places where you buy hard drives have a limited time (e.g. 30 day) over the counter replacement policy, or you may need to send the drive someplace if that doesn't apply - in the latter case, see what you need to do to RMA the drive on the manufacturer's web site, if you choose to.
............................

Your ram may not be detected properly by your mboard bios.
I would think that if the ram passes a memory test, this does not apply, but it could be the memory test uses lesser settings for the ram than the mboard bios does when it runs the tests.

Some ram does not strictly follow the Jedec standards that most mboard bioses use for ram settings. It's possible in that case for the bios to set settings for the ram improperly.
In the bios Setup, make sure the ram voltage stated is the same as specified on the modules, or in the specs for the modules, and that the ram timing numbers stated are the same settings as specified on the modules, or in the specs for the modules, or higher (higher = slower).
Usually if the bios is set to default settings (if you're not sure, load bios defaults in Setup), those things are correct, but if you have tried fiddling with the settings, or if the ram doesn't follow the Jedec standards, they may not be correct, and you may need to change them.
Ram voltage that is too low often causes problems; it can be .1v high, or within a range specified for the modules, and not cause a problem, except that the ram will probably get hotter at higher than the specified or lowest voltage.
If you have a mix of modules, the bios usually automatically sets the ram voltage and ram timings, and the mhz at which the ram runs at if applicable, to those of the slowest specs of all the modules. That can cause problems if the ram voltages required by the modules are different.

This found on the Muskin web site:

Some also-ran memory module makers rate their ram when only one module is installed in a mboard - that often results in different results than when more than one or their modules is installed, that makes the specs appear better . Mushkin, and most major makers, probably including Crucial, Corsair, Kingston, etc., rate the ram when all the ram slots are occupied, and they actually run tests on each mboard model, or at least on some models with the same main chipset.
Sometimes the ram timings of those also-ran module makers must be slowed down (you have to use higher numbers) or the ram voltage must be increased a .1v step or two, in order for more than one of their modules to work properly in a mboard.


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#7
January 31, 2009 at 04:14:58
Whew, ok, lots of information and questions there tubes!

I have bought 2 brand new, not rebuilt, hard drives that I have been using. Each drive shows the same failures. I started with the Seagate 80GB Serial ATA HD 7200/8md/SATA-3G. To verify if I had purchased a faulty drive, I then bought the Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 250GB Hard Drive-7200, 16MB, Serial ATA-300. I only used 1 HD at a time for this build, I never connected them, or partitioned them together.

I have been creating a partition for XP during startup. The first few times that I tried to install XP PRO SP3 using the OEM install disk, I created one partition using the entire disk, with only 8MB not being part of the partition. The partition would be around 78,000 meg for my 80 Gig HD. After reading yours, and several other posts on other tech sites, I realized this was not a good idea.

For the last 2 dozen or so times that I have attempted to load XP, using 2 different brand spanking new OEM XP PRO SP3 install disks. I have made the partition for XP many different sizes. I have made it 10,000 meg, 8500 meg, 6000 meg, 9000 meg, 8000 meg, 7500 meg, 7000 meg, even 4000 meg. No joy on any of those attempts.

I have also burned through about 13 or so SONY Accucore DVD+R RW DVD disks. I have burned a version of XP SP3 install disk. Burned just the I386 directory, burned just the man.dll file, burned a bootup disk for XP SP1, and one for XP SP2. None of them would get XP to install. I would get the same GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 failure.

Now, if the XP disk only works with a CD-only device, why have I read on Multiple tech sites, that burning it to a dvd works fine, or even better in some cases than a CD? I do not have access to a CD-only drive. I do not believe that would be an issue in any case. Especially with all the other errors I have been getting. More detail on those in the following paragraphs

For all of the install attempts I have tried I would use the NTFS, or NTFS (quick) formatting. Just for kicks, I also tried using the FAT32, and the FAT32 (quick) formatting on the smaller partitions under 8000 meg. Install still failed.

I verified that I am using the 80 wire IDE cables. I verified it by actually counting the individual conductor wires. I am attaching the blue connector to the Motherboard, and the black connector to the DVD/CD device. The grey connector is not being used.

I am using the Lite-On 52X cd-rw & 16X DVD-ROM combo drive, model #DH-52C2P08C. I have also tried the Sony DVD+-R 20X DVD+-RW/+-R/RAM/CD rewritable drive. Model #DRU-V200A-BR. Also tried using a DELL 48X Max CD-RW Drive, part #C3090. I can't see all 3 devices being bad with the same failures.

During the past weeks the PC has become very unstable. I now get different blue screens of death after some, but not all, restarts of the problem PC. The failure codes are sometimes the same, sometimes they are different.

I will list all of the ones I have been having. These codes are in addition to still receiving the original "One of the components windows needs could not be installed. A components file does not match the verification information, blah blah blah." When this error occurs, it is always the Error SXS.DLL: Syntax error in manifest policy file "D:\I386\asms\1000\MSFT\WINDOWS\GDIPLUS\ GDIPLUS.MAN" on line 4 error. Oh yeah, also sometimes the computer will just crash/freeze at any point during the install.

Blue Screen of Death Failure Codes:

Sometimes there is a message at the top of the screen about IRQL failure, or some such, I will include that information, if it is present, along with the Technical Information number strings.

These codes appear on the screen under Technical Information:

***STOP: 0x0000008E (0xC0000005, 0x80538F3B, 0xF765647C, 0x00000000)

***STOP: 0x0000008E (0xC0000005, 0x8055159A, 0xF7595CF8, 0x00000000)

***STOP: 0X0000008E (0xC0000005, 0x8055159A, 0xF7636508, 0x00000000)

***STOP: 0x0000004E (0x00000099, 0x0001FA85, 0x00000001, 0x00000000)This error code has the message PFN_LIST_CORRUPT in the top portion of the screen.

***STOP: 0x00000050 (0xF7607142, 0x00000000, 0x8963FD1D, 0x00000000) This error code has the message PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA in the top portion of the screen.

***STOP: 0x0000000A (0x00000000, 0x0000001C, 0x00000000, 0x804E1627) This error code has the message IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL in the top portion of the screen.

***STOP: 0x0000000A (0x04021008, 0x0000001C, 0x00000001, 0x804E162C) This error code has the message IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL in the top portion of the screen.

***STOP: 0x0000000A (0xFE9054BC, 0x00000001, 0x00000000, 0x804E8D94) This error code has the message IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL in the top portion of the screen.

Each of the error codes I have listed would sometimes come up several times in a row on a reset, sometimes the error codes would alternate each time the PC was reset. Still other times the install would make it all the way until the GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 failure, which could always be counted on to fail the install if no blue screen came up.

Each time I have tried a different XP install disk, or changed the cabling, or tried a different IDE device, I would always boot from the disk and reformat the drive using NTFS, or NTFS (quick).

I also tried copying the I386 directory from the install disk to the Hard Drive. When the GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 error came up, I would hold down the shift key and hit F10. This would bring a DOS window up on the screen. I would then type xcopy d:\I386\*.* c:\i386\*.* /s/e. Whenever I tried this (about 6 or 7 times), the computer would either hang/crash, or a blue screen would come up with one of the aforementioned codes before all of the files could be copied over.

I actually managed to complete copying over the I386 directory ONE time. However, when I tried running install from the C:\ drive using c:\i386\winnt.exe, the install would stop with "the *filename* is either corrupt or absent", "press esc to skip or A to abort". I tried skipping the first couple of errors, but there were so many files in this state, that I eventually just aborted that install.

So, what do you guys think? Is this hopeless? Can this build be saved? Once again I really do appreciate all the help and suggestions you all have. Thanks.


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#8
January 31, 2009 at 04:22:08
I am also going to attempt to make XP install disks using an external floppy drive I just got. Not too confident that will work though.

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#9
January 31, 2009 at 16:49:37
Thanks for taking the time to provide a long detailed response.

Going by your info, it's extremely unlikely these problems have anything to do with your hard drives, and that's even more unlikely if they're new and did not previously have an operating system on them.

However.....
Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

Also - the connector on the end of the data cable should enter the socket straight on, near where it is plugged in - it should not be at an angle there.

...

"During the past weeks the PC has become very unstable."

Are you using a new mboard, or one you had been using previously?

What is it's make and model??

Your system MUST be stable while doing Windows Setup!
You MUST cure whatever the cause(s) of that is(are) FIRST!

You can get weird problems if the cpu is overheating, or because of improper installation of the heatsink or the heatsink/cpu thermal compound.
If you installed the cpu/heatsink/fan yourself, are you SURE you did that right? E.g. some thermal pastes containing metal particles are conductive, and if you put too much between the cpu and heatsink, it can squeeze out and cause problems. Too much thermal paste or thermal grease of any kind can cause problems.
If the cpu fan can be installed either way ontop of the heatsink, it MUST blow TOWARDS the heatsink - you should be able to see the entire fan blade from the top - no supports or central non moving core visible on the top side of the fan itself.
Make sure the cpu is not overheating - look at the current reading in the bios Setup for that, after the computer has been on long enough for it to reach a stable temp.
DO NOT fiddle with overclocking or upping anything (outside of possibly upping ram timings) until AFTER your system is stable.
Some mboards have a jumper that "over-volts" the cpu core voltage, and the higher setting may NOT show up in the bios readings, although a higher "idle" cpu temp than average will - check your mboard manual to see if it has such a jumper - if it does, make sure it is in the normal position (I have an Asus A7V600 mboard that had that jumper in the wrong position, when brand new; the box it was in was still sealed).
Some heatsinks must be installed in a certain direction - if they're not installed that way, they may not be sitting flat on the cpu, and in that case the cpu heats up a lot faster and to higher temp than it normally should.

"Blue Screen of Death Failure Codes:"

Those Stop: messages are generated by XP (or 2000) during Setup or after it has been installed, NOT by the mboard's bios.

The Stop: 0X000000xx error , and the matching error_message_with_underlines_between_ words, if present, is usually all you need to quote, once.
Usually the stuff in the brackets is useless because Microsoft has no findable info about what the strings mean, other than in a very small number of cases, other than possibly the first string within the brakets, e.g. 0xC0000005 in
(0xC0000005, 0x80538F3B, 0xF765647C, 0x00000000), and the strings after the first one, or all of them, are often different every time for the same Stop error.

Sometimes there is also info about a particular file that is causing the problem - quote that if you see it - you may need to click on "details" or similar.

The errors you are getting can have many causes, but they're probably most commonly caused by a ram problem.

STOP: 0x0000000A ... IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL - obviously the strings within the brackets were different in every case.
That error has many possible causes, but sometimes you get it simply because the ram is not making proper contact with the contacts in it's slot(s). You can ALSO randomly get all sorts of other Stop: errors if you have that problem.
It's also quite possible it's only the ram timings or the ram voltage it's the bios is using that isn't right that is causing the problem.

STOP: 0x0000008E
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/315335
This behavior may occur if one of the following conditions is true:
One or more of the random access memory (RAM) modules that are installed on your computer are faulty.
The RAM configuration is incompatible with Windows XP.


STOP: 0x0000004E PFN_LIST_CORRUPT
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/lib...
This is a Windows 2000 (and XP) Executive character-mode STOP message. It indicates the memory management page file number (PFN) list is corrupted.
Etc.

So it's a memory related problem too, that in theory can be caused by ram problems, or can also be caused by you having or installing incompatible hardware.

- See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

You MUST unplug the computer, or switch off the AC power source to the computer, whenever you fiddle with any component or connection inside the case and/or connected to the mboard, because ATX mboards are always powered in some places as long as the ATX PS is getting live AC, even when the computer is not running, and that includes some of the contacts in the ram slots.
If you did not do that every time you fiddled, you may have damaged the mboard circuits, or anything connected to it.

DO NOT touch the contacts on the modules with your fingers after you have cleaned them!

Some mboards must have the ram installed in certain slots first if not all slots are occupied, otherwise it may not work 100% correctly in all situations. You have to install matched pairs of ram modules meant to run in dual channel mode in certain slots - if one is in the wrong slot (that has the right number of contacts - some mboards can have two types of ram installed), it should not cause ram problems, but both modules will then be in single channel mode. See your mboard manual.

- see the last part of Response 6 starting at:
"Your ram may not be detected properly by your mboard bios."
and make sure the settings in the bios are correct for the ram you are using, or you could try setting the ram timing to higher numbers (higher = slower settings, more likely to work in all situations).

- run the memory diagnostics again - as I said before, it's in theory possible that may pass even when the timing and/or ram voltage setting(s) in the bios Setup is not right.
.....

- if you still get Stop: errors when trying to run Setup....

- try unplugging everything that is not essential to running Setup - if your mboard has onboard video, if you are using a video card, unplug it and try plugging the monitor into the onboard video port.

- if your keyboard and/or mouse are USB connected, try a PS/2 one(s).

- if there are two video ports, on the mboard for the onboard video, or on a video card, if the monitor can be plugged into either port with or without a DVI to VGA adapter, you may need to plug it into the Primary video port - see the mboard or the video card manual, or if you get the errors when it is plugged into the one port, try it plugged into the other one.

- if you do not have onboard video, try a different video card if you can.

- you haven't tried a CD-rom only drive yet, but as you have said, it's unlikely that all the optical drives you have tried are incompatible with Setup.

......

When you no longer get the Stop: errors.....

- if you still get the "ERROR SXS.DLL: Syntax error in manifest policy file "D:\i386\asms\io\msft\windows\gdiplus\gdiplus.man" On line 4

then doing this:
"I am also going to attempt to make XP install disks using an external floppy drive I just got."

will probably NOT help, unless you have copied the \i386 folder from the CD to the partition you want C to be on and you run Setup from there, AND you may need to replace CONTROLS.MAN in that.

Loading the XP floppy disk set is meant for old computer mboard bioses that can't boot a bootable CD, or for use if the Windows CD is not bootable (some Upgrade CDs) - it does not have the entire contents of the CD or even the \i386 folder - it only gets you to the first screen in Setup after the initial files have been loaded from the CD - you still need the Windows CD, or you need to run setup from the \i386 folder. If it's the optical drive model that's causing the error, you will probably still get the error if it's connected to a data cable, whether you have a Windows CD in it or not.

"However, when I tried running install from the C:\ drive using c:\i386\winnt.exe, the install would stop with "the *filename* is either corrupt or absent", "press esc to skip or A to abort".

You should NOT get "the *filename* is either corrupt or absent" if the files were copied successfully and you were not having ram or hard drive problems - the files in c:\i386 should all be prefectly fine - you don't need any other files, and you don't need the Windows CD to be in a drive (Setup may default to looking for files on the CD - change where it looks if it does that - point it to C:\i386) . If you had an optical drive data cable connected at the time you did that, and the model is not compatible with Setup, you may need to disconnect the data cable to it while running Settup.

"For all of the install attempts I have tried I would use the NTFS, or NTFS (quick) formatting. Just for kicks, I also tried using the FAT32, and the FAT32 (quick) formatting on the smaller partitions under 8000 meg."

When XP (or 2000) says it is partitioning, it is actually partitioning AND formatting the partition. It is always a good idea to NOT use the quick partitioning the first time you set up a partition - the "full" slow partitioning checks the partition space thuroughly for possible undetected bad sectors while partitioning - if you re-partition a partition shortly after having done that the slow way, using the quick partitioning is fine - it merely re-writes only the two partition tables (FAT 32) or the MFT (Master File Table; NTFS) - it does not check the partition space for bad sectors.
If you re-format a partition without deleting it, a full format checks for bad sectors too (a quick format does not), but it may not be as thurough as a "full" partitioning.

"burned just the man.dll file"

HUH?
Where did you get the idea you needed to fiddle with that file?

You MAY need to make the CONTROLS.MAN file, and copy it to replace the one in \i386 if you copied that folder's contents there, or if you want to make a burned disk with that file replaced, you could copy the entire Windows CD contents to a folder on another computer, then make the CONTROLS.MAN file and replace the one in \i386 in the CD contents in that folder, then make a bootable burned CD (you need the normally invisible Microsoft whatever.iso file to be on the CD for it to be bootable).

See the part in response 6 starting with:
"- some insist the problem is caused by a file on the CD that is corrupt - CONTROLS.MAN - "
....

"I would then type xcopy d:\I386\*.* c:\i386\*.* /s/e. "

It sounds that should work, IF you are having no problems with your system, but apparently you were....

"Whenever I tried this (about 6 or 7 times), the computer would either hang/crash, or a blue screen would come up with one of the aforementioned codes before all of the files could be copied over."
......

There are several other things you could try.

1. Install the hard drive you want to have the Windows partition on, on a working XP computer, connected (some mboard SATA sockets are connections an operating system on a drive cannot be booted from - use one of those) and/or connect to any free SATA header, with the boot order in the bios Setup set so you are not booting from it.
Partition and format it in XP (e.g. at Control Panel - Classic view - Administrative Tools - Computer Management - Disk Management) - if you have any doubts existing partitions might be corrupt, delete them first.
With the (Control Panel -) Folder Options - View settings set on that computer to show hidden and system files...
copy the the entire contents of the \i386 folder from the regular XP SP3 CD to the partition you want Windows to be on - usually that's the first one.
Make the CONTROLS.MAN file as above, and replace the one on your drive with it, in \i386\etc.

Install the drive you prepared in your own computer.

A - Boot the computer using the original XP SP3 CD.

HERE Let the initial files load and press R at the first screen that asks if you want to Repair Windows, if you don't get any BSOD Stop: messages before that, or hold down Shift and press F10, which apparently takes you to the Recovery Console too.
- If you get the GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 error,
QUIT setup, either by typing exit in the recovery console, or by pressing F3 if that prompt is on the screen, then see B below.
HOLD the power button in until the computer shuts off, or the computer will reboot at that point.
- If you do not see the GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 error, go to c:\i386 and run winnt.exe - it should work fine.
e.g.
- if the prompt does not show C:\ or C:\(a subfolder or subfolders), then type C: (press Enter)
- if the prompt does not show C:\ (no subfolders; it may show C:\Windows), type cd.. (enter) as many times as it takes to get to C:\ (no subfolders)
then type: cd\i386 (enter), then type: winnt (enter)

B - Boot the computer using the XP Setup floppy set
- if booting using the Windows CD produces the GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 error, you need to disconnect the data cable on the optical drive(s) in case the drive is what triggers the error.
Then boot using the XP Setup floppy disk set
Then do the same procedure as in A, starting at HERE.
.................

Some who got the the GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 or other similar errors found this worked fine....

Windows often generate error messages about a problem with a file that's actually FALSE because it's caused by something else Windows has no error message to display about.

If your problem is caused by CONTROLS.MAN, it is only on the CD, and/or in the \i386 folder wherever it is - it is not copied to the Windows installation.

2. Install Windows by using the original XP SP3 CD on the partition you want Windows to be installed on, when the drive is master and connected BY ITSELF on another computer that you DO NOT get the GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 error on, then install the drive in your own computer, so that it is booted from.
- XP may boot fine, and load drivers and settings appropriate for your mboard while booting the first time (that may be slow).
- If the difference in mboard chipsets and/or other onboard hardware is more than a little different, XP (or 2000) often cannot deal with the change and will not boot all the way into Windows - typically you see the first bit of Windows graphics, then a black screen with a blinking cursor top left and nothing further happens.

In that case you need to run an XP Repair Setup, often called a Repair install.

In the case of drastically changed hardware, it will set Windows to the new hardware situation.

You will need a Windows CD of the same version as the one of your Windows installation, and the Product Key, preferably the one that was used to install it, but it can be one for the same version as the one of your Windows installation.

How to do an XP Repair Setup, step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...

3. In either case, after Setup is finished, you will need to load all the drivers for your own mboard and card(s) after Setup is finished.

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, for sure, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.
.....

Since XP Setup is seeing your SATA hard drives, your mboard bios settings must have the SATA controllers/SATA drive detection in IDE compatible mode or similar (the labelling varies) - that's a good thing - Setup can then see the SATA drives no problem in that case.
You can always load the SATA controller drivers after Setup is finished, and set the bios to SATA or SATA RAid mode after that, if you so choose, to take advantage of the 300mb/sec max data burst speeds (although, those speeds can only be used for very short periods of time, and you may not notice much difference between that and the 133mb/sec max burst speeds IDE compatible mode provides).

Windows Setup cannot see SATA drives if that setting in the bios Setup were set to SATA or AHCI or similar mode, or SATA RAID or AHCI RAID mode or similar, and you would have to provide a floppy with the SATA drivers on it at the beggining of Setup (you press F6 near the beginning of Setup), in a regular floppy drive, or in one of a very few USB connected floppy drive models Setup recognizes (most of them are no longer being made), or you would have to make a bootable slipstreamed CD with the contents of the XP CD with SATA drivers integrated into it.
.....

Does your mboard have a floppy data cable header? If it does, a regular floppy drive works in all situations, as long as it's before any CD drive or hard drive listed in the computer bioses boot order - a USB floppy drive does not work in the early stages of Setup, unless it's one of the very few (mostly old and no longer made) models 2000 or XP Setup recognizes, and does not work in some other situations, and it costs a lot more if you buy it new. Even if your case has no bay in which you can install a floppy drive so it's accessible from the outside, you are better off using a regular floppy drive, even if you only use it for emergencies or while installing Windows for loading SATA or SATA RAID or SCSI or other drivers.
.....

"...I created one partition using the entire disk, with only 8MB not being part of the partition"

When XP (or 2000) partitions a hard drive, it always leaves the last ~8mb on each physical drive unallocated (it is not part of any partition).
When you prepare a drive with something else, the program may not do that, and the drive still works fine in XP (or 2000), but some diagnostic (e.g. Seagate's Seatools) or partition manipulation (e.g. Partition Magic) programs find something wrong with the last or only partition when they examine a drive meant for XP (or 2000) use that does not have that - it's best to have that there.

"The partition would be around 78,000 meg for my 80 Gig HD."

80gb is the manufacturer's bogus decimal size (e.g. 1 kb = 1,000 bytes; 1 gb = 1,000,000,000 bytes) - they've always specified it that way. The mboard bios and Windows sees it as it's binary size, which is always smaller (1,024 bytes/kb, 1,024kb/mb, 1,024mb/gb; 1,073,741,824 bytes/gb), so ~80gb manufacturer's size is ~74.5gb as seen in the mboard bios, and in Setup before the drive has been partitioned and formatted; partitioning and formatting use up more drive space, so the drive ends up having about 74gb of usable space in Windows (NTFS partitioning/formatting takes up a lot more space than FAT32 partitioning/formatting on larger drive partitions).

At the very least I recommend two partitions on the drive, the second one about 5gb or more on large drives, to give you a place to backup personal data, drivers, etc., you don't want to lose if you ever have to load XP fron scratch on C in the future (some people frequently re-load Windows from scratch when they can't figure out problems they are having).
Better still is three partitions or more, especially if you download a lot of music, movies, videos, etc,, etc. so you don't have to reload them when you re-do C. Any programs you installed on other than C will have to be re-installed, but any personal files and settings that are on those other partitions for/in those programs will still be there.
e.g. A friend of mine has three hard drives, and they have three (on a 160gb; 64gb FAT32 for C), two (on an 80gb), and two partitions (on a 500gb). Occaisionally I have had to re-load C for her, but getting everything working again is a lot easier when everything was not on one partition. I back up her Outlook files and other stuff that was on C to (an)other partition(s) etc. before I run Setup from scratch, if possible (you can set Outlook to regularly backup it's personal to other partitions in any case).

I often choose to make C FAT32 for XP (or 2000) because there are more programs you can use and more things you can do to fix a problem if Windows is on a FAT32 partition rather than on a NTFS partition. XP (and 2000) will not let you make a partition larger than 32gb FAT32 - I used a Win 98SE Startup floppy, with the fdisk version on it replaced with the updated version, to make that 64gb FAT32 partition - or you can use a Win ME Startup disk's fdisk, or a free hard drive manufacturer's drive preparation program to do that.
....

"...I have made the partition for XP many different sizes."

I should not make any difference what size it is, as long as XP can see the full size of the partition or the hard drive.
....

"I have also burned through about 13 or so SONY Accucore DVD+R RW DVD disks. I have burned a version of XP SP3 install disk. Burned just the I386 directory, burned just the man.dll file, burned a bootup disk for XP SP1, and one for XP SP2. None of them would get XP to install. I would get the same GDIPLUS.MAN on line 4 failure."

So - you always get the same error?, and obviously - the problem is not the CD, although...

All optical drives are somewhat particular about which media (brands and types of disks) you use in them - some are fussier than others. There are usually lists of which media the particular model works fine with on the manufacturer's web site, some media makers have lists of models of optical drives their media works fine with, and sometimes is you search using review and the miodel number, you find they have tested the model with various media and show you the results, good or bad
Similar to the situation for ram, if you don't find the brand and type of media mentioned somewhere as working properly in the drive model, it MIGHT work fine, but it might NOT.

"Now, if the XP disk only works with a CD-only device, why have I read on Multiple tech sites, that burning it to a dvd works fine, or even better in some cases than a CD? "

I have not heard of that at all - I HAVE heard CD-R disks are the best to use.
On the other hand, CD-R disks have been around the longest and they are the ones most likely to give you no problems in any optical drive, CD-rom thru DVD combo drive.
Of the DVD disks, DVD-R disks have been around the longest, and should probably read properly in any DVD drive.

I addition to that, burned CDs or DVDs made in one drive model, other than probably a CD-R, or a DVD-R, may NOT read properly in drive they were not made in.

But that's probably not what your problem is, and in any case, the original XP SP3 CDs should work fine, in any drive.


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