moan for the day

Own / Own
April 20, 2009 at 06:41:04
Specs: Vista Ultimate, Intel E6750/4Gb
I'm only posting this here because I suspect the perpetrators probably lurk on these forums. But why is it that some supposed 'techs', when they are faced with a reinstall of an operating system, even though the box has a legitimate CDKey sticker for XP Home, insist on installing a copy of XP Professional - usually cracked? It makes no sense to me unless they're looking for future business when the system goes screwy. Anyone else come across this or is it just a rogue in this area?

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#1
April 20, 2009 at 07:10:59
Do you know the difference between OEM & retail versions of an OS?

Did you provide the CD of the version that your key matches? If not, what made you think that the tech had it?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
April 20, 2009 at 07:28:10
Sorry, you're not getting my drift, it wasn't a tech question as such, it's that I've just been out to look at (yet another) PC where the system has a perfectly good XPHome CDKey sticker on the case (a Dell in this instance) but as soon as it boots up it's apparent that XP Professional has been installed instead. Questioning the client they admit that 'another tech' fixed a problem before by reinstalling Windows. I was just wondering why these techs didn't just go ahead and reinstall XPHome from an OEM disk - it's not rocket science, even if you may need a couple of attempts for the key to match, but surely it's better than putting a cracked version of XP Pro on the box? End of moan!

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#3
April 20, 2009 at 08:41:51
I'll tell you where part of the problem lies. If you're a tech, then you already know that many OEMs only give a repair CD with a purchase if it's requested by the customer & many customers don't ask for it.

I had to do a reinstall on a Dell not long ago. I have Dell CDs but if it had been a Toshiba & the owner didn't have the repair CD, I would have been stuck. What would you suggest in that case? Tell the owner to order a repair CD & wait a week for it?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#4
April 20, 2009 at 09:04:27
No, you don't need a Dell OEM CD to reinstall a Dell XP system, or a Toshiba CD to reinstall a Toshiba XP system, you can use a generic (non-branded) OEM CD - as long as you have the CDKey and a bit of common sense it's easy enough to figure out if it's SP1/1a/2 etc. and then acquire the appropriate drivers with a bit of research - the system will activate and be perfectly legal. After all, branded' disks are generally just OEM disks with a utility for automatically installing drivers. My gripe is why a 'tech' would choose a cracked XP Pro version to install when they know that it will cause problems in the future?

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#5
April 20, 2009 at 09:13:22
I think one problem might be that not all techs are really techs.

If a person is repairing or refurbishing computers they should have the Dell, Gateway,Hp, Acer, Mar etc cds. Home, pro,oem and retail.....and a good volume license disk.

They should also have and use Microsofts key updater so the key fits the COA sticker.

You would be amazed at how many computers come in with no sticker at all. And no sign of a sticker ever being put on the box. Getting the key on the machine to reinstall is easy enough but irritating.

I meet people who claim to be techs and even computer consultants....but they have no idea how to get the key, update it or pull all the drivers off the machine before doing a reinstall.

I also keep hearing about using 9 in 1...which is fine in a pinch, but a time bomb for the end user if not installed and setup correctly.

Oh! I am not a tech. My claim is to be able to find the o/- switch ...and that's on a good day.

W.L.


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#6
April 20, 2009 at 09:19:06
johnr I wonder if you have ever heard of System locked preinstalled Windows OEM XP? The SLP by itself is technically a product key but in realty preinstalled OEM XP does not need any product key. The COA label on the machine is not a product key. It is merely a certificate of authenticity that the Windows installed on the machine is a genuine Windows.

i_Xp/VistaUser


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#7
April 20, 2009 at 09:31:33
The few times I've come across SLP, without actually knowing it at the time, I used the phone activation & that's worked. Maybe I was just lucky, but I still go back to my original question as to why use the cracked XP Pro option on a perfectly normal Dell system - last week it was a Packard Bell with the same issue.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#8
April 20, 2009 at 10:23:35
I didn't know that there was a one size fits all OEM CD. Where does one get a generic OEM CD?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#9
April 20, 2009 at 12:17:09
"why use the cracked XP Pro option on a perfectly normal Dell system"

Probably just a bad habit. It worked once or twice for them so it is always done thereafter, without thinking.

some other bloke...


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#10
April 20, 2009 at 12:38:52
It worked once or twice for them so it is always done thereafter, without thinking. and caring until the naive customers return the machine and demanding to know why am I getting Microsoft nagware "This copy of Windows is not genuineā€ warning" on the Welcome Screen and the desktop itself. The days of the techs taking advantage of M$ volume license keys are numbered.

i_Xp/VistaUser


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#11
April 20, 2009 at 14:39:18
Johnr,
I agree with what you are getting at. I have found the same issue on a lot of computers and in most cases it is some friend of a friend of my child or school chum that did it....And at most times at the request of the computer owner who doesn't want to admit to it..

guapo,
There may not be a one size fits all OEM version as you state it but I have found that a regular OEM version of Xp Home and even XP pro (including different SP) can be used to reinstall 98% of most branded computers...Untill the XP Pro version 'c' came out this was true. As to the so called embedded BIOS encrypted installations...well just say there are ways to work around that as johnr mentioned....

so where is the issue?

I think it is just that a lot of people learn a tad about computers in school and automatically become professionals ( not to discredit them for that). The problem is that they have learned to slipstream an installation and only believe that they need the one as a do everything disc. Then when they find they need an original to perform certain repairs they dummy up and spamm the forums with different credentials ( check out all the one post wonders) for answers from the ones that actually do the research and find the repair fixes. Only to find out they can't do it and wow...presto guess where the computer comes to...

I personally have all the various versions of Microsofts operating systems so reinstalls are not an issue with me. I would think that most in here would have them as well or good quallity copies...I also have special editions of Jerry Honeycutts Microsoft Windows Registry Guide with the Cd's. Plus a few other informational books including Computers for Dummies

lol

Change Is Good
http://www.citizenlink.org/Stopligh...


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#12
April 20, 2009 at 15:49:47
I still don't understand what "a regular OEM version" is or was. OEM is manufacturer specific as far as I know & as a person who repairs personal PCs, I'm certainly not going to make it hard on myself to make one work on another.

The idea that a tech is supposed to have every OEM version in his bag works well on paper but not in real life. I only want real life answers.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#13
April 20, 2009 at 15:59:12
Why is it assumed that this "cracked" version was installed by a tech?

In the vast majority of cases, these "cracked" versions are installed by "script kiddies", who seldom own any legitimate software.

To suggest, without really knowing, that the perpetrator was a tech, is just plain slanderous.

Please let us know if you found someone's advice to be helpful.


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#14
April 20, 2009 at 16:02:27
I hope the following link will settle the disagreements over what is aq "regular OEM version." IMO it's just a phrase or expression.

http://www.infocellar.com/winxp/oem...

i_Xp/VistaUser


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#15
April 20, 2009 at 16:25:12
Sci-guy, how can you attribute cracked versions to any one particular group of people? There certainly aren't any statistics to say it's techs, script kiddies, republicans, gays, transvestites or web site owners from California.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#16
April 20, 2009 at 17:41:43
XpUser,

Nice link

Guapo,

How do you reinstall a XP pro machine if you do not have the CD's?
or, if you have the XP pro CD how do you use it to repair a XP home version.? I guess you do what we were talking about...create a slipstream version of what you have and install it. How do you perform SFC if you have only one installation CD? If you perform SFC on a home version of XP it will implant the professional tag to it because it sees it as missing from the home version....hmmm maybe this is the upgrade that is being performed on unsuspecting customers.

It is not that it looks good on paper....it is the proper way to achieve the repair....I am sorry but one does not become a tech and not have the proper tools to perform his job with or they will be handicapped in their options.

Change Is Good
http://www.citizenlink.org/Stopligh...


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#17
April 20, 2009 at 20:31:03
First of all, it's rare that I have to do a reinstall. I usually can clean the machine of malware which is the problem I see the most. As I said, Dells are not a problem. Ever since the other OEMs stopped sending CDs, you're right, it's a handicap.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#18
April 21, 2009 at 00:51:25
Sci Guy, I reckon that anyone who's been paid for doing the job must be considered to be a 'tech' - these guys advertise in local free sheets, usually with just a mobile number & no proper receipts provided. As I originally said, I come across these guys frequently - if they want to sue me for slander then bring it on, the sooner we're rid of these cowboys the better, though, having said that, at least they produce work for legitimate techs when, like these jobs, they screw up.

I also don't often do reinstalls but in cases like this where there's a legitimate COA and an illegal OS then it's often the best solution.

Guapo, as you'll have probably realised by now, we're talking about bog standard OEM disks - the ones that are supplied to independant OEM builders - these have no ties to major manufacturers but still have the same full functionality & work with 95% plus of all branded machines. You just need one for each basic version of XP together with each SP release (Media Center version is slightly more problematic (preparing to duck again!!)) and access to a good source of drivers (though manufacturers have become a lot nicer to us over recent years by allowing access to these in many cases), Having individual recovery disks for each company is pointless as many of them are just images with drivers particular to that model.

Lurkswithin, that's exactly my point. Anyone who's a legitimate tech will have a selection of different reinstall options, not just a bulk licence XP Pro disk that they shove on everything.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..."


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#19
April 21, 2009 at 01:16:05
guapo,

Not to make reference to any one having to do re-installs regularly. To me it is the last option. Usually I prefer to clean a system to replacing all the crapola a lot of users have installed on their computers.
the others are right in that the OEM is the original microsoft installation disc and not a commercial copy of the slipstreames versions although Dell OEM DSP discs that were issued can be used as they are actually just commercial copies of microsoft's unbranded OEM discs.

Correction ,

The Unbranded OEM full installation discs do not require a different version for what service pack was installed. I use an SP2 version to install on older Home XP (non SP and SP1) and the attached COA works just fine without any issues at all to re-activate. Saves time in installing the updates though!.

Change Is Good
http://www.citizenlink.org/Stopligh...


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