Making bootable recovery partition

July 15, 2008 at 21:23:29
Specs: Windows XP, AMD/1GB

I want to know how I can make a bootable recovery partition like HP/Compaq have on there rigs, so I can restore the computer to its original state if something goes wrong.

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#1
July 15, 2008 at 22:06:04

Then don't do what they are doing. The most idiotic thing that i have ever seen is to keep the back up or restore program on the same harddrive as the operating system. If that drive goes down you lose everything...including the restoration program...

Either learn to copy a partition and store it on another drive preferably an external one that can be stored seperately until needed or on CD/DVD discs.

http://www.pcstats.com/articleview....

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swim with the current;
in matters of principle,
Stand Like A Rock


"People demand freedom of speech to make up for the
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#2
July 16, 2008 at 02:06:59

You can do it with a couple of different software packages that are available. One of them is gdisk (a dos tool for disk wiping/format/partitioning drives). It's part of Norton ghost. You don't need to buy it, just get the dos .exe file and put it on a boot disk for XP. It will allow you to create hidden partitions. I would suggest using another drive. Like a 4-8(fresh install is about 2gigs big) gig drive to store the image. I like Acronis Image Software for making images. Never had a problem in years. You can create an image of a fresh install of your OS , store the image on that partition and then apply it with Acronis BootDisc if anything happens. So say a virus corrupted your registry. Simple pop in the Acronis Boot Disc and select the image to restore from.
Here's another solution:
http://www.tech-forums.net/computer...

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#3
July 16, 2008 at 08:47:59

Wouldn't it be easier just a too have a XP setup disk ?

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Related Solutions

#4
July 16, 2008 at 09:45:47

I suggest purchasing Ghost or Acronis. They both make it very easy. You can create the image on CD/DVDs or a second hard drive (better yet, both).

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#5
July 16, 2008 at 17:40:39

ghostman 1

"Wouldn't it be easier just a too have a XP setup disk ?"

Not really... I can restore from an image in about 10 to 12 minutes using Acronis instead of a couple of hours reinstalling from an installation disc and then having to reinstall all the other software plus then having to resort to having all the updates and all that crap.

In The Matters Of Style,
swim with the current;
in matters of principle,
Stand Like A Rock


"People demand freedom of speech to make up for the
freedom of thought which they avoid."


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#6
July 18, 2008 at 11:53:52

Quote:"Wouldn't it be easier just a too have a XP setup disk ?"

Lurkswithin...is right! Applying an image takes 5 minutes for me. 10-12 minutes if I have an image fully loaded with apps. Apposed to the 2 hours to setup XP and then the time to reconfigure the registry and system settings.Plus the time to reinstall all the software. Consider installing Visual Studio...add another hour+. Why when you can do all of this before making an image.


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#7
July 19, 2008 at 06:12:19

I think I would much rather have a fresh clean install, than a copy of a problem old Image.
Wouldn't the Image have to be done right after a fresh install, Or what is the point.
I much rather do it right the first time with a fresh install, then a back up copy of a problem already on the disk. And it does not take 2 hours to do a fresh install I believe it is 39 minutes.

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#8
July 19, 2008 at 15:03:12

Ghostman1,
2 hours was an estimate of registry settings and tweaks. Not the mention installing windows updates which most require reboot before installing all of them. Unless you have a sp2 /sp3 slipstream disk of XP. I think you failed to consider this. Yes it takes, maybe 45 minutes fully attended. But why not make an image of a fresh install and save 40 minutes. It's not rocket science to make an image. Plus with an image you can append new Microsoft Updates to the previous image. For some people this is complicated so for them a fresh install is a better procedure!

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