I don't know how to use Knoppix to fix Windows

January 30, 2012 at 10:19:00
Specs: Windows Vista
I have downloaded Knoppix files and copied them to a flash drive. What do I do next? There are no clear directions anywhere that I could find.

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#1
January 30, 2012 at 10:29:44
I guess it depends upon what your Windows problem is, but I'd use a Windows disk to fix it.

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#2
January 30, 2012 at 13:09:55
Knoppix is normally a CD or DVD. It is possible to make it to a usb but it is a more advanced task.

Knoppix is what is called a live cd. You boot to it after you make it from an ISO image file.

ijack is correct in that we would need to know more about the issue.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#3
January 30, 2012 at 21:10:40
I have an older laptop with XP on it. When I start it, I get the error "Windows could not start because the following file is missing or corrupt
\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\CONFIG\SYSTEM
I don't have any CD and can't get into restore.

I downloaded the files to a flash drive, put it in, and it shows as a hard drive under "Boot from." I move it up to first position and select it, but it doesn't do anything.

I imagine I will need to get a DVD and burn Knoppix to that?


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Related Solutions

#4
January 31, 2012 at 13:36:41
All Knoppix will do is prove that you have a Windows issue. They symptom you give points to a registry error and you would have to be darned clever to sort that out by looking through the file system using Knoppix.

I assume you tried this:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307852

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
January 31, 2012 at 19:02:19
"I assume you tried this:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307...

Yes, that didn't work. According to what I read about Knoppix, it functions asl another operating system while saving your original files and allows you to install another operating system. That is fine with me.


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#6
February 1, 2012 at 07:23:06
If you use a Live Knoppix CD (or DVD) then it will run from just your CD (or DVD) drive and the RAM. It also allows you to access the HD, even though it is not using it. You can therefore get your own files off the HD and onto a flash drive. When a computer runs Knoppix but not Windows it more or less proves that you either have a Windows software issue (provided that you can access the HD).

In Windows "System" (on its own as given) is the registry, which is why this looks like a registry issue. There are various magic registry fixers around but they will not help because all they do is remove invalid entries, which don't usually matter much anyhow.

I've not run into a way of re-installing Windows using Knoppix - sounds a bit hard to believe to me because it would have to get its new Windows files from somewhere to be able to do that.

I'm afraid you either need a Windows disk or a restore disk.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
February 1, 2012 at 08:22:27
Thank you all for the comments. As I understand it, with Knoppix, I could possibly save my files to a flash drive. Then I could reinstall Windows XP. Is that correct? Thanks again :-)

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#8
February 1, 2012 at 08:51:54
Yep. I'm more familiar with Puppy Linux but Linux is mostly single click working. You go to the HD icon then drag and drop your files onto the flash drive.

You don't just put the Knoppix download on a disk, you have to use a burner program with a "Burn image (ISO)" feature. It is part of most burner software, including Nero, and their are small freebies around if you get stuck. You will then have to go into BIOS and ensure that the CD drive is set ahead of the HD so that it will boot to linux by "powering on" with the disk in the drive. Most certainly you can get your own files, so ensure you do this before attempting a reload of Windows.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
February 1, 2012 at 09:32:48
If you do manage to create the Knoppix (or any other Linux) disk, you can do a repair using it. The original problem that you have is usually fixed using the method described here:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307545

but by using a Linux disk you can achieve the same thing by using the file manager to replace the corrupt/missing files.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#10
February 1, 2012 at 09:33:45
Before you go to all that trouble. If you can access the disk with Knoppix look for a file C:\Windows\Repair\SYSTEM. Copy that to C:\Windows\System32\Config (but to be on the safe side move the existing SYSTEM file there to another location. Then try rebooting. This SYSTEM file seems to get corrupted quite easily on XP, particularly if it gets too large.

It's safer to do this using a Windows boot disk but if you don't have one this should work. This KB article tells you more: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307545


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#11
February 1, 2012 at 10:54:58
Interesting thought in #10. Seems to me that still gets you to something resembling the newly installed state and I've usually found that the real time consumer is to get back from initial install to the way Windows was before it went wonky. Makes me think it might be best to do a proper Windows install and be done with it.

Just my opinion though, every one to his own of-course.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
February 1, 2012 at 11:12:53
Great forum! Thanks, I'll work on it when I get some time. Fortunately, I have two other working laptops :-)

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#13
February 1, 2012 at 11:18:14
The SYSTEM registry hive contains mainly hardware settings. The version in Repair should be newer than the original setup, but you may need to reinstall a few hardware drivers. Still, it's a lot less trouble than installing from scratch (especially if you don't have an install disk).

My XP64 install used to come up with this problem a lot, and this was an easy fix. I had a 2000 install on the same computer and used that to copy the file. To male things easier you make a newer copy of SYSTEM once it's working OK.

Reinstalling from scratch can be a pain (even if you have an install disk). You have to find all the software install diska and serial numbers, plus back up and restore your data.


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#14
February 1, 2012 at 16:05:44
OK, I take the point in #13 about the drivers. Maybe my computer is a bit more tailored than most but I usually find the big hassle is getting all the old programs back and the multitude of settings that I prefer to what MS land you with. Opinions abound of-course but if you've no install disk then making a new SYSTEM is probably your only option anyhow.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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