how do I set my resolution to 1600X900 in win

November 13, 2010 at 16:41:15
Specs: Windows XP

I have the Dell IN2010N monitor, and it says the best resolution for it is 1600x900. Right now, its resolution is 1280x1024. I went to settings and the only other option it gives me is 1600x1200. Can anyone tell me how to change it to 1600x900?

See More: how do I set my resolution to 1600X900 in win

Report •


#1
November 13, 2010 at 17:50:28

Assuming you have installed the latest drivers for the graphic adapter and that option isn't there then your vid card does not support that rez.

Report •

#2
December 15, 2010 at 03:01:24

I have this problem also. I had to buy a new monitor for my old Hp and now I live with the image all stretched out. I try never to restart my computer because if I do the I lose the image altogether and just get an error message telling me to change the settings to 1600 x 900 (not an option as far as I can see). I have to unhook the monitor, power off, restart with out the monitor hooked up and then hook up the monitor. I hate this, but at least I can do my work, even if the image is distorted.

Report •

#3
December 15, 2010 at 08:12:06

"I have to unhook the monitor, power off, restart with out the monitor hooked up and then hook up the monitor."

A monitor is NOT "Hot swappable"
If the monitor is switched on when you disconnect it and connect it, you can easily DAMAGE the monitor or the video adapter !
............

Are you connecting the monitor via a DVI cable or a VGA cable or a HDMI cable?
You often have more resolution choices if it's connected via a VGA cable vs.a DVI cable, or via a DVI cable vs. a HDMI cable.

As Pappy said, you could try loading the latest graphics drivers, if you haven't already done so.

If you can't select 1600 X 900, choose a resolution less than that, that has the same ratio of 16:9, or 1.777 to 1 when you divide the first number by the second number, and
Turn on Clear Type in Windows XP or Vista - makes type/fonts on LCD screens look clearer.
http://www.microsoft.com/typography...

If you can't select a resolution with a ratio of 16:9 - 1.777 to 1 - only ones that are 4:3 - 1.333 to 1 -

What monitor drivers do you have loaded ?

Control Panel - Display Properties - Settings.
What does it say there?
What monitor on what video adapter ?

The best ones to have loaded are the specific ones for your monitor model - then by default Windows will only show you the resolutions that both the monitor model and the video drivers support.



Report •

Related Solutions

#4
December 29, 2010 at 16:00:20

"Pappy
Assuming you have installed the latest drivers for the graphic adapter and that option isn't there then your vid card does not support that rez. "


Wow. Finally a clear answer to what was a perplexing and aggravating problem. THanks Pappy. I am having a similar issue. So should I buy and install a new card?


Report •

#5
December 29, 2010 at 16:33:16

Jonny_S

See response 3.
Answer the questions in it.

Tell us the make and model of your brand name system, or if you have a generic desktop system, the make and model of the mboard.

The specific model of a brand name system is shown on a label on the outside of the case somewhere, or it can often be determined by going to the brand name's web site and loading a program they have available, if Windows is still working, on the subject computer.
For Dell computers, they have a Service Tag number - the specific model can be determined by using that on their site, or can often be determined there automatically by you downloading some software, if Windows is still working, on the subject computer. The Service Tag number should be on a label on the outside of the case, probably on the bottom on a laptop, on the back on a desktop, and is often also shown in the bios Setup.

The model, sometimes the make, of a mboard in a generic desktop system is usually printed on the mboard's surface in obvious larger characters, often between the slots.
.......

If the video adapter you're using is built into the mboard and cannot be removed, IT'S NOT A CARD !
If your computer is a laptop or netbook, almost always, unless you have a more expensive high end model, the video adapter is built into the mboard and cannot be removed.

Newer mboards may have the option of connecting via a VGA cable, or a DVI cable, or a HDMI cable.
For the same video adapter, if the specific video drivers have been installed properly, a VGA connection usually has more resolution choices than a DVI connection, and a DVI connection usually has more resolution choices than a HDMI connection.


Report •

#6
January 3, 2011 at 09:45:36

Again, very helpful response Tubesandwires:
Monitor: HP 2159 series Wide LCD

Video adapter: Intel(R) 82865G Graphics Controller

Computer: Dell OptiPlex GX270

OS: Windows XP Professional Service Pack 3 (build 2600)

Main circuit board: Dell Computer Corp. 0FG019

VGA cable connects monitor to the machine. I don't think I have the other options to hook up.

So I guess the issue is with the graphics controller. Unsure if it's a card or part of the motherboard but sounds like a separate item.



Report •

#7
January 3, 2011 at 09:49:35

And I should mention that I have made sure all drivers are up to date (graphics and monitor). The manufacturer says that the optimum resolution for this monitor is 1920x1080/60 Hz which is not an option in the settings menu.

When I ran a diagnostic utility on Intel.com I got this:

Graphics Driver
Product Detected Intel® 865G
Current Driver Installed 6.14.10.4396
A customized computer manufacturer driver is installed on your computer. The Intel Driver Update Utility is not able to update the driver. Installing a generic Intel driver instead of the customized computer manufacturer driver may cause technical issues. Contact your computer manufacturer for the latest driver for your computer.
Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility (Chipset INF)
Product Detected Intel® 5, 4, 3, 900 Series Chipsets
Current Version Installed 5.1.0
This version is valid.

Thanks very much for your time and help!


Report •

#8
January 3, 2011 at 15:37:27

Just to update: Intel offers a work-around for this. I have attempted to download the drivers (several versions). All open and give me the error message that I don't meet the minimum system requirements. I read the requirements and I appear to have them all so I give up. What a f---ing pain.

Report •

#9
January 3, 2011 at 20:21:01

Jonny_S

If you're using the onboard video - the video built into the mboard itself - , your "Dell OptiPlex GX270" 's video adapter is the "Intel(R) 82865G Graphics Controller".

The onboard video port(s) is(are) always in the same I/0 area as most of, or all of, the other ports that are on the back of the desktop case.

If you're using a video card that's installed in a mboard slot, the video port(s) for that are always farther down on the back of the desktop case in a card slot space.

The newest 82865G video drivers available are probably the ones on the Intel web site, NOT the ones on the Dell web site.

Intel Graphics drivers
http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Det...

NOTE that in some cases when you install the Intel video drivers for an Intel 8xx chipset, there are ADDITIONAL resolutions you can choose, in addition to the ones in Display Properties - Settings - when you RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen.

"A customized computer manufacturer driver is installed on your computer. The Intel Driver Update Utility is not able to update the driver. Installing a generic Intel driver instead of the customized computer manufacturer driver may cause technical issues. Contact your computer manufacturer for the latest driver for your computer."

That indicates your have the Dell video drivers installed.
- When you have a brand name desktop computer that does NOT have a built in monitor, you DO NOT necessarily need to load the Dell supplied video "drivers".
- When you have a laptop or notebook computer , you MUST load the brand name supplied video "drivers", because they have the monitor drivers for the built in display built into them - you usually can't get the monitor drivers separately .

You have two choices....

- better - you can Un-install the Dell video "drivers" in Add or Remove Programs, reboot, DO NOT load video drivers when "New Hardware" pops up, then run the installation download for the Intel video drivers.

OR - I think this is a poor second choice -
Replace the brand name's drivers with the Intel drivers - both versions will be on the computer, XP will use one of them.

(Dell info)
Graphics
Have disk driver installation steps for Microsoft Windows* XP
http://www.intel.com/support/graphi...
.......

"Intel Chipset Software Installation Utility (Chipset INF)
Product Detected Intel® 5, 4, 3, 900 Series Chipsets
Current Version Installed 5.1.0
This version is valid."

That indicates the INF Update Utility - the main chipset drivers - for the main chipset - has / have already been installed.
If you ever install Windows from scratch, after Setup is finished, you need to install either the Dell supplied INF Update Utility or main chipset drivers, or you install the Intel INF Update Utility:
http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Det...
...........

"The manufacturer says that the optimum resolution for this monitor is 1920x1080/60 Hz which is not an option in the settings menu."

The monitor can only display what the specific video drivers for the video adapter allow it to display. All monitors have a maximum resolution - the video drivers are what determine which resolutions can be displayed at or under under that resolution . LCD and Plasma monitors have an "Optimal" or "Native" resolution - that's the resolution the display will look the best at when set to.

If both the specific monitor drivers and the specific video drivers are installed properly, in Display Properties - Settings, you should see
HP 2159 series, or similar, on Intel 865G Graphics, or similar.
If you see
Plug and Play Monitor on Intel 865G Graphics, or similar, you haven't installed the monitor drivers properly yet.

By default, Windows shows you only the resolutions and number of colors settings that both the monitor and the video drivers support.
If the monitor is set to Plug and Play Monitor, or if you bypass Windows default choices to show all the settings the video drivers support, you can choose settings that will DAMAGE an LCD or Plasma monitor.
........

If you still can't select 1600 x 900 after installing the Intel video drivers....

NOTE that in some cases when you install the Intel video drivers for an Intel 8xx chipset, there are ADDITIONAL resolutions you can choose, in addition to the ones in Display Properties - Settings - when you RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen.


Intel info......

Excerpts...

Graphics
Supported display modes and resolutions

I cannot select a larger display mode (resolution, refresh rate, or colors setting). How do I resolve this issue?

Your computer and/or monitor may not support the entire range of display modes (resolutions, refresh rates, or color settings) supported by the Intel® integrated graphics chipset and drivers. By default, the Windows* operating system excludes display modes not supported by both the graphics controller and the monitor. If you are unable to select the desired display mode, try each of the following suggestions in the order listed below or try the Display Mode/Resolution Wizard.

http://www.intel.com/support/graphi...

.......

Or see response 3 - select a resolution that has the same ratio, and turn on Clear Type.
.......

If you can't get a satisfactory display at the Optimal or Native resolution, or at a lesser resolution that's the same ratio of width to height, then you'll need to get yourself a video card that DOES support the Optimal or Native resolution.

HOWEVER brand name systems often have this problem, which is even more likely if your GX270 system is a small form factor model. You may need to get a power supply that has more capacity as well as video card.

The GX270 series can be either a regular sized mini tower computer, or a small form factor computer that is a skinnier tower or a slim desktop model.
If you want or need a video card, we need to know your specific GX270 model number.
For Dell computers, they have a Service Tag number - the specific model can be determined by using that on their site, or can often be determined there automatically by you downloading some software, if Windows is still working, on the subject computer. The Service Tag number should be on a label on the outside of the case, probably on the bottom on a laptop, on the back on a desktop, and is often also shown in the bios Setup.

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.


.


Report •

#10
January 3, 2011 at 20:39:02

"....Intel offers a work-around for this. I have attempted to download the drivers (several versions). All open and give me the error message that I don't meet the minimum system requirements. I read the requirements and I appear to have them all so I give up. What a f---ing pain."

"All open and give me the error message that I don't meet the minimum system requirements."

Are you SURE that's what the message says ?

You MAY get a message like that if you downloaded the WRONG drivers version.

If you use a proper download and do the steps the wrong way, you WILL get an error message that says various things, but one of them is not "doesn't meet the minimum system requirements" or similar.

You can always do it this way, as I said in response 9 -

"Un-install the Dell video "drivers" in Add or Remove Programs, reboot, DO NOT load video drivers when "New Hardware" pops up, then run the installation download for the Intel video drivers."

The correct Intel video drivers version is pointed to in response 9.

It is a VERY good idea to DISABLE the resident module(s) - the part that runs all the time looking for suspicious activity - of all anti-malware software you have running on the computer, BEFORE you un-install and install video "drivers", because sometimes it (they) interferes with the software installing properly.
After you have installed the video drivers, you can enable it (them) again.

If you don't know how to do that, tell us which anti-malware software you have installed.


Report •

#11
January 4, 2011 at 07:38:40

"Are you SURE that's what the message says ?"

Yup, am sure. Tried each different version of what was available to just to shot-gun it and none of them worked. When I read the system requirements they seemed to fit my machine but still got that message.

I will read through and see what I can come up with. Invested way too much time on this already :(

This and your other response are far and above what a normal, nice person would do. I really appreciate your taking the time to help some random stranger with this issue. I wish I could somehow pay you back.


Report •

#12
January 4, 2011 at 08:49:29

Using Microsoft Security Essentials for antivirus & spyware. I don't know that I can uninstall the drivers from the add/remove window - the Dell driver download manager is there - not sure if that's what I should uninstall or should I go into the video settings and try there.

Intel released a "fix" for this last year which is much later than the driver link you posted so I think that this later fix should work, it just conflicts with my machine. I have downloaded and tried to open - it's just a zip file with the setup.exe but it stops after step #2 with that same error message.


Report •

#13
January 4, 2011 at 09:04:49

Here's Intel's page discussing it:
Unable to use the native resolution, such as 1920x1080, 1680x1050 and 1440x900

Symptom(s):

On some displays, users may be unable to use the native resolution when using Intel® chipset graphics. Resolutions such as 1920x1080, 1680x1050, and 1440x900 are not available in graphics properties.

Cause:

The display's EDID is not read properly when connected to some digital flat panel displays. Display devices describe its capabilities by sending EDID (Extended Display Information Data) to the computer.

Solution:

Intel has released a graphics driver to specifically address this issue; however, there may be side effects to this solution such as longer than normal resume times from standby. This solution will only work with external displays such as DFP displays connected to the computer's VGA port. This driver is not designed to address issues with a notebook's built-in display (Local Flat Panel) or with TV’s connected to the system. This driver is provided as is. Intel has not tested, and does not guarantee, the operation of the driver for this purpose.
...

http://www.intel.com/support/graphi...


Report •

#14
January 4, 2011 at 09:06:49

Sorry for all the posts. I think I figured out why Intel's fix won't work. My chipset is 8656 and the fixes are for these other versions. Intel no longer supports my chipset. :(

If that's the case I have to see if I can get an updated graphics controller or it's new machine time if I can't live with resolution being a little off...

Intel® 3 Series Chipsets
Intel® 4 Series Chipset
Intel® 82945G Express Chipset
Intel® 82946GZ Graphics Controller
Intel® 82G965 Graphics and Memory Controller Hub (GMCH)
Intel® 82Q963 Graphics and Memory Controller Hub (GMCH)
Intel® 82Q965 Graphics and Memory Controller Hub (GMCH)
Intel® 945 Express Chipset Family
Intel® 946 Express Chipset Family
Intel® 965 Express Chipset Family
Intel® B43 Express Chipset
Intel® G31 Express Chipset
Intel® G33 Express Chipset
Intel® G35 Express Chipset
Intel® G41 Express Chipset
Intel® G43 Express Chipset
Intel® G45 Express Chipset
Intel® Q33 Express Chipset
Intel® Q35 Express Chipset
Intel® Q43 Express Chipset
Intel® Q45 Express Chipset
Mobile Intel® 4 Series Express Chipset Family
Mobile Intel® 945 Express Chipset Family
Mobile Intel® 945GM Express Chipset Family
Mobile Intel® 965 Express Chipset Family


Report •

#15
January 4, 2011 at 11:17:45

"I wish I could somehow pay you back."

You pay me, and us, back by solving your problems. We get some satisfaction out of that.
.........

"Sorry for all the posts."

The more feedback, the better, as far as I'm concerned, and as far as some others who answer here regularly are concerned. Our biggest problem is not enough info and not enough feedback from the person who started the subject, and them not answering most of the questions we ask of them. .

You can Edit - including add to or delete content from - your own posts on this web site, for a limited amount of time, by clicking on the icon that looks like a notepad at the top of your posts, except for the first post if you started the subject after at least ione response post has appeared. .
.......

As I said in response 10

"You can always do it this way, as I said in response 9 -

"Un-install the Dell video "drivers" in Add or Remove Programs, reboot, DO NOT load video drivers when "New Hardware" pops up, then run the installation download for the Intel video drivers."

The correct Intel video drivers version is pointed to in response 9. "

I don't have a Dell system to look at presently - I never have a brand name system unless I'm working on someone else's computer - so I don't know what you see in Add or Remove programs regarding the video drivers.
- Sometimes there is a listing for the video drivers in All Programs that has Un-install to select.
- Dell often has most of the major drivers in a Dell something folder on the root of the C drive (directly attached to C rather than a folder elsewhere) - there may be an Un-install to select there.

Another way - Go to Device Manager - Display Adapters - (the name of the display adapter) and RIGHT click on it, choose Un-install, reboot, DO NOT install drivers when "New Hardware" pops up, double click on the Intel video "drivers" installation file.
.......

Why do you NOT install drivers when New Hardware pops up ?

Sound and video "drivers" always have associated files that must be installed properly along with the actual drivers. If you install only the actual drivers, it's likely the device will NOT work properly.
That applies the the"drivers" for many other devices as well.



Report •

#16
January 4, 2011 at 12:09:26

Trust me, I edited like 3 times after posting :) I know what you mean about not enough info - I figure you guys are helping me, make it as easy as possible.

I uninstalled the drivers AND the Dell driver utility and rebooted. THe drivers seemed to reload automatically - nothing popped up in the re-boot cycle. I think the issue is the graphics card is too old and Intel is no longer supporting it so no fix is applicable to my machine. Now working through the nearly impossible Dell website to see if anyone else has any ideas.


Report •

#17
January 4, 2011 at 15:27:30

Jonny_S

" The drivers seemed to reload automatically ..."

I doubt very much that they're built into Windows itself - the 865 main chipset was probably first released AFTER XP was first released circa 2001, and the SP updates after that did NOT update most of the drivers Windows has built into it after that.

Did you look here:

"Sometimes there is a listing for the video drivers in All Programs that has Un-install to select.
- Dell often has most of the major drivers in a Dell something folder on the root of the C drive (directly attached to C rather than a folder elsewhere) - there may be an Un-install to select there."

If there is a Dell folder with drivers in it, they're probably listed by their Dell specific download file name. You can get clues about what they're for by
- Right click and look at the info in the Properties of the files
- run them to find out what they're for - you can Cancel the installation
- there may be *.txt or *.doc or *.hlp files you can click on to find out what they're for

If that doesn't help....

The "drivers" were probably installed by a Windows Installer software package.

Go here and download the "Windows Installer Cleanup Utility":
http://www.softpedia.com/dyn-postdo...

It's a Microsoft program , but they're no longer offering it on their web site because they found it causes problems if a system has Microsoft Office 2007 , or components of it (Outlook, Excel, Word, PowerPoint etc.), on the system. I assume that also applies to later versions of Office. I don't know whether it only causes problems only if you use for removing Microsoft Office 2007, or components of it, or whether it causes problems when that's present - however if you don't have that or later, it's a very safe program.

Download it, double click on it to install it, run it.
If it lists the video drivers, DELETE the entry for them.
......

If it doesn't list them.....

Go to Device Manager - Display Adapters - (the name of the display adapter)
Copy down the exact name of the display adapter.

RIGHT click on it, choose Un-install,
DO NOT reboot when prompted.

For this next part you must be able to see the \INF sub folder in your C:\Windows folder.
If you do not see that.....
Go to Control Panel - Folder Options - View
Enable Show hidden files and folders - a green dot in the box
Click on the box before Hide Extensions for known file types to remove the checkmark or dot.
Click OK at the bottom of the window.

Search the C:\Windows\Inf folder for *.inf files that have the exact name of the display adapter in the text. Copy the *.inf file(s) found to elsewhere, then delete the originally found file(s) in C:\Windows\Inf.

That should prevent Windows from automatically installing the video drivers while booting. DO NOT install drivers when New Hardware pops up - double click on the Intel video "drivers" installation file after the desktop screen has fully loaded.

If that doesn't prevent Windows from automatically installing the video drivers while booting., try this, as a last resort.

Go to Device Manager - Display Adapters - (the name of the display adapter) and RIGHT click on it, choose Un-install,
DO NOT reboot when prompted - double click on the Intel video "drivers" installation file.


Report •

#18
January 5, 2011 at 06:50:34

Bottom line - my display adapter won't adapt to the needed resolution (unless I write my own driver codes, which I could do theoretically but it would take a long time). I can buy a card (slot available) for 30 bucks. Ordering today, hopefully will resolve everything.

Report •

#19
January 5, 2011 at 11:56:04

Jonny_S

As I said above......

"It is a VERY good idea to DISABLE the resident module(s) - the part that runs all the time looking for suspicious activity - of all anti-malware software you have running on the computer, BEFORE you un-install and install video "drivers", because sometimes it (they) interferes with the software installing properly.
After you have installed the video drivers, you can enable it (them) again."

"Using Microsoft Security Essentials for antivirus & spyware."

Scroll down - it shows where you can enable / disable Real time protection:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/p...
.............

"Bottom line - my display adapter won't adapt to the needed resolution ..."

You don't know that for sure until you have tried installing the latest Intel supplied graphics drivers. Your display adapter is older but it's not ancient.

It doesn't take rocket science to un-install the existing graphics drivers. At least one of the methods I've already told you of should work fine, if not more than one of them. If I had your system I would be able to figure it out in a few minutes.
....

If you're bound and determined to get a graphics card, then you may need to buy a power supply that has more capacity as well.

See the last part of response 9 starting at
"If you can't get a satisfactory display at the Optimal or Native resolution,...."

If you supply the specific model number of the system, or your Service tag number, I can dig up more info about that for you.


Report •

#20
January 6, 2011 at 13:36:01

"It is a VERY good idea to DISABLE the resident module(s) - the part that runs all the time looking for suspicious activity - of all anti-malware software you have running on the computer, BEFORE you un-install and install video "drivers", because sometimes it (they) interferes with the software installing properly.
After you have installed the video drivers, you can enable it (them) again."

Did that.

"You don't know that for sure until you have tried installing the latest Intel supplied graphics drivers. Your display adapter is older but it's not ancient.
It doesn't take rocket science to un-install the existing graphics drivers. At least one of the methods I've already told you of should work fine, if not more than one of them. If I had your system I would be able to figure it out in a few minutes. "

Did thus too. Several times - and even ones that weren't compatible with the specs of my machine. There is no update that I know of for my machine. Also, on a similar post on the Dell website at least one person who is familiar with my machine agrees that there is no current software fix available to adapt my adapter to the needed resolution. Like I said earlier, the driver could be written but I am not going to spend all that additional time to figure out codes.

My machine is a Dell Optiplex Small Mini-Tower System Board, Service tag 2LHB541

Schematic of my machine's board is here:
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

Other specs:
Windows XP Professional Service Pack 3 (build 2600)
Install Language: English (United States)
System Locale: English (United States) Dell Computer Corporation OptiPlex GX270
Enclosure Type: Desktop
Processor a Main Circuit Board b
2.40 gigahertz Intel Pentium 4
8 kilobyte primary memory cache
512 kilobyte secondary memory cache
Not hyper-threaded Board: Dell Computer Corp. 0FG019
Serial Number: ..CN137405C7017H.
Bus Clock: 800 megahertz
BIOS: Dell Computer Corporation A06 09/29/2004


Report •

#21
January 6, 2011 at 22:22:17

Jonny_S

"My machine is a Dell Optiplex Small Mini-Tower System Board, Service tag 2LHB541"

GX270 mboards
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

The third one is for the small mini tower - does that look identical to yours ?
It should.

AGP slot
4 PCI slots
4 ram slots

Manuals
Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX270 Service Manual
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

Power supply
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

The small mini tower appears to have a standard sized power supply.
If it does, it can be replaced with any standard sized ATX PS.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

Manuals
Dell™ OptiPlex™ GX270 Systems User's Guide
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

Technical specs
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

Small mini-tower computer

It uses regular height cards / mounting brackets - there are length limitations .....

card sizes = three PCI slots support cards up to 27.9 cm (11 inches) long, and one PCI slot and the AGP slot support cards up to 22.9 cm (9 inches) long

bus protocols
AGP
8x/4x modes at 1.5 V

Power

DC power supply - Wattage - Small minitower 250 watts

Installing and removing AGP and DVI Adapter Cards
Small minitower
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

Drivers
http://support.dell.com/support/dow...

- Video

6 possibilities

The two ATI ones should NOT be there !
Your mboard has an AGP slot, NOT a PCI-E X 16 slot !
They are for ATI video chipset cards . Not applicable to your onboard video.

The first Intel Driver for the 82865G should be the correct one for your onboard video, but it may be a lot older than the latest Intel version.

The next 3 Intel drivers may NOT be the right ones for you onboard video !
Your mboard has the 865 integrated graphics NOT the 845 integrated graphics!
Grantsdale are 91x series chipsets !
However, Intel drivers often support multiple integrated video chipsets

The last two drivers are for NVidia video chipset cards . Not applicable to your onboard video.
..........

If you get an AGP video card, the AGP slot supports video chipsets that support 4X and 8X AGP specs.
Some mboard chipset that support 4X or 8X AGP specs CANNOT use a card with a video chipset that also supports 2X AGP specs. Usually when that applies, there is a WARNING in the manual that you CANNOT use cards that support 2X AGP / 3.3 volt cards, however in this case I see nothing of the sort here:
Installing and removing AGP and DVI Adapter Cards
Small minitower
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

E.g. This shows you which ATI video chipsets support 2X AGP specs as well as 4X or 4X and 8X AGP specs - scroll down:
http://support.amd.com/la/kbarticle...

If you install an AGP video card, the onboard video will be automatically disabled by the bios when the card is installed, and the ram will no longer be shared with the onboard video (you can't disable it by changing any setting in the bios).

If you get a PCI (NOT a PCI-E) video card, installing it will probably NOT disable the onboard video and in that case some of the ram will still be shared with the onboard video (you can't disable it by changing any setting in the bios, but you can disable Windows from using it in Device Manager).

Whatever video card you get, if you don't want to have to buy a power supply with more capacity, you must get a card that has a video chipset that requires a minimum 250 watt power supply, or less. There aren't many of them out there. A PCI video card often draws less power than an AGP one.

If you get yourself at least a 350 watt power supply, you will have many more video cards to choose from.


Report •

#22
January 10, 2011 at 08:45:15

Interesting and amazingly thorough response. Not a gamer - don't know if I want to upgrade PS too.

I found (I think) the right video card - AGP - with power source (250 watt) compatible with my machine.

The one I found is EVGA 128-A8-N303-L2 here:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

Since I have the mini-tower, the AGP slot requires a low profile card. While this card is low profile, the bracket is not but looks like it will be adaptable to a low-profile configuration.

I do have PCI slots available as well.

If I install the AGP card and it disables the onboard video, will that be a problem? I assume that the new card will carry the video so no.


Report •

#23
January 10, 2011 at 10:23:23

Jonny_S

"I found (I think) the right video card - AGP - with power source (250 watt) compatible with my machine.

The one I found is EVGA 128-A8-N303-L2 here:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...
"

I don't know how you think you determined that video chipset requires a minimum 250 watt PS from the info at that link, I can't find that there, if that's where you got the info from, unless that's in the user reviews, and EVGA itself no longer has any info about it on their web site.
However, this card has the same video chipset and it does say that in the info:
http://reviews.cnet.com/graphics-ca...


"Since I have the mini-tower, the AGP slot requires a low profile card."

WRONG.

See the Technical specs link in response 21.

That info has several sets of specs for the three types of cases.

Small mini-tower computer

It uses regular height cards / mounting brackets - but there are length limitations.

"card sizes = three PCI slots support cards up to 27.9 cm (11 inches) long, and one PCI slot and the AGP slot support cards up to 22.9 cm (9 inches) long "

The OTHER two OptiPlex™ GX270 case types must use low profile cards.
Your small minitower case is merely a shorter regular width minitower case. It uses standard height cards, and probably a standard sized power supply.
Some Dell models can come in a SLIM minitower case, which is narrower and does require that you use low profile cards, and a small form factor power supply, but that does NOT apply for the OptiPlex™ GX270 series small mini tower case.

"While this card is low profile, the bracket is not but looks like it will be adaptable to a low-profile configuration."

That's NOT a low profile card you linked to. If it was, "low profile" would have been mentioned prominently in the ad. What determines whether it's a low profile card is the height of the bracket, not necessarily the height of the physical card itself. Most video cards these days have physical cards that are lower height. The same physical card may come as a model with a regular height bracket, or as a model with a low profile bracket, or in a few cases it may come with one bracket type installed, the other available in the box if you need the other type. The vast majority of video cards are regular height cards, as in, they have the regular height bracket.

"I do have PCI slots available as well."

You could use a PCI video card, you won't as likely need a power supply with more capacity, but it will not perform as well as the same video chipset on an AGP card .

As I said in response 21...

If you get a PCI (NOT a PCI-E) video card, installing it will probably NOT disable the onboard video and in that case some of the ram will still be shared with the onboard video (you can't disable it by changing any setting in the bios, but you can disable Windows from using it in Device Manager).

" A PCI video card often draws less power than an AGP one. "
even when it has the same video chipset.
........

"If I install the AGP card and it disables the onboard video, will that be a problem?"

No.
In fact, your same ram will perform better when a program benefits from a higher data transfer rate.
Sharing ram with the onboard video as much as halves the max data transfer rate all the ram can achieve when the ram is not shared.

"I assume that the new card will carry the video so no."

That's right.


Report •

#24
January 10, 2011 at 12:44:49

Very sorry, I mistyped - I meant card is not low profile but looks like it is adaptable to one. While not spelled out expressly, the tech specs of the card are consistent with a low-profile card it measures 65 mm x 165.

Here are the manufacturer's links:

http://www.evga.com/products/morein...

http://www.evga.com/products/pdf/12...

The case of my machine is about 100 MM wide. Looks like low prof. to me when I opened it. The PCI slots are available and not low profile but a standard size card in the AGP slot won't fit for sure. The dummy bracket that's in there now looks like a low profile mount.

System requirements for the card are on the details page at Newegg:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

Intel Pentium III, AMD Duron or Athlon class processor or higher
128MB system RAM
AGP compliant motherboard with an AGP 2.0 slot
10 MB of available hard disk space (50 MB for Full installation)
CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive
VGA or DVI-I compatible monitor
A 250W system power supply

Was considering upgrading to 2 gig of RAM also (at 1g now)


Report •

#25
January 10, 2011 at 20:47:49

Jonny_S

"While not spelled out expressly, the tech specs of the card are consistent with a low-profile card it measures 65 mm x 165."

As I said in response 23......

"What determines whether it's a low profile card is the height of the bracket, not necessarily the height of the physical card itself. Most video cards these days have physical cards that are lower height. The same physical card may come as a model with a regular height bracket, or as a model with a low profile bracket, or in a few cases it may come with one bracket type installed, the other available in the box if you need the other type. The vast majority of video cards are regular height cards, as in, they have the regular height bracket."

Low-profile...card size = 6.35 cm [2.5 inches] high - that's from the top of the bracket to the bottom of the card at the contacts.

Regular card size = 10.67 cm [4.2 inches] high - that's from the top of the bracket to the bottom of the card at the contacts.
Or - I took some measurements - when the card is installed -
~ 3 11/16" [~ 9.37 cm] from the top of the AGP or PCI slot to the top of the bracket .
or ~ 4 5/16" [~ 10.95 cm] from the top of the mboard to the top of the bracket.
The metal bracket - 4 3/4" [~ 12 cm] from the top of the bracket to the bottom of the bracket - the bottom of it is beside the edge of, and below the surface of, the mboard when installed.
(I used a small framing square to determine those.)
The AGP and PCI slots are the same height, although sometimes they've been soldered in such they're not quite touching the mboard on the bottom.

Go here to look at the Back of the case:
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

Measure from the bottom (left side) of the I/O area ( 3 ) to the top (right side) of the card slot spaces ( 4 ).
If that's about 4 5/16" [~10.95 cm], the case uses full height cards.
.......

Your small minitower case has the optical drive slot horizontally across the front of the case.
Since the optical drive's enclosure is a standard width, that indicates the case is wide enough that full height cards can be installed in the mboard slots

"The PCI slots are available and not low profile but a standard size card in the AGP slot won't fit for sure. The dummy bracket that's in there now looks like a low profile mount."

I have NEVER encounted a regular width case where the PCI cards are full height and the AGP card is low profile height - they've always been the same height.


Report •

#26
January 13, 2011 at 07:35:39

"Your small minitower case has the optical drive slot horizontally across the front of the case. Since the optical drive's enclosure is a standard width, that indicates the case is wide enough that full height cards can be installed in the mboard slots."

Nope, the optical drive slot is vertical. No way a standard card would fit in this machine. If at it's widest point it's 100 mm wide (more like 105), there's no way a standard card would fit inside, right?

"I have NEVER encounted a regular width case where the PCI cards are full height and the AGP card is low profile height - they've always been the same height."

Again, not a regular width case. The PCI slots are also horizontal AND even the dummy bracket that corresponds with the AGP slot is low profile. I wish I could post a pic to show you. - this is it:

http://i.dell.com/resize.aspx/esupp...

Final resolution (pun intended): The new card came yesterday, while not described as low profile, it is low profile compatible. I swapped a low-prof. bracket and installed the card in about 3 minutes. Booted up, ran software, screen aspect ratio is perfect. In fact it displays quicker now - an unexpected benefit (but understandable why) to my addressing the problem - I was only concerned with aspect ratio. Now my beautiful girl's pictures come up in proper proportion!

Thanks again Mr. Tubesandwires!


Report •

#27
January 13, 2011 at 08:52:52

Jonny_S

We're glad to hear you have installed a video card successfully.

It sounds like it came with the regular height bracket installed, and also had the low profile bracket included with it.
..............

I have figured out what caused the confusion.

You didn't supply me with enough feedback about some of the info I supplied,
AND
You DO NOT have the official Small Minitower Computer.

Front - Small Minitower Computer
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

You have either the

Front - Small Form Factor Computer
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...
Can be used either vertically, as a "slim" minitower, or horizontally if you remove the stand.

or the

Front - Small Desktop Computer
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...
Can be used either horizontally, or vertically, as a "slim" minitower, if you install the stand.

The three types of cases have three different power supplies:
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

I provided a link to that in response 21 saying you had the third regular sized one - you did not mention whether that was the same as yours - obviously it wasn't.

This shows the case you have when the Service tag is used to search with
http://support.dell.com/support/dow...

but the type of case is NOT named.

It's either the Small Form Factor Computer, used vertically, as a "slim" minitower

or

it's the Small Desktop Computer, used vertically, as a "slim" minitower


Report •

#28
January 13, 2011 at 10:34:05

It sounds like it came with the regular height bracket installed, and also had the low profile bracket included with it.

Nope, had to buy separate. I was careful to inspect the specs and my machine so even though it's not low-profile card, it's certainly adaptable to it (call me Macguyver skills).

I may have not said the right type of case or misdirected you, if so, my apologies. I certainly don't want to waste your time but still I was telling you that there was no way a standard bracket in the AGP slot would fit in my machine. It's at most 105mm OUTSIDE measurements so inside is necessarily less. Must be the slim minitower.


Report •

#29
March 16, 2011 at 04:57:29

Hello,

I have an issue with intel 945 from my netbook, and its making me mad. Can anyone please help me??? Should i start another discussion?

win xp home sp3 - acer aspire one - dell monitor 1680x1050 - vga .

Intel says they had problems with this and other "high" standar resolutions. I installed the new drivers, but my res still doesnt show up! I can choose 2048x1536 and many more, but not 1680x1050.

The strange thing is that if i install my monitor and reboot, repeating both steps 4 or 6 times, I can get the resolution, and the rest stop showing. But then i log off and back to the problem again. I didnt log off in a month just to avoid that, but now i need to use my netbook as a portable pc, i cant reboot 6 times every day, its painful. I even thoght of making a software to do that for me, but i hope thats not necesary.

Ask anything, and really lots of thanks for any ideas.


Report •

#30
March 16, 2011 at 12:23:01

Alejo

"Should i start another discussion?"

You're much more likely to have more people see your Topic and possibly answer when you start a discussion (Topic) because it's at or near the top of a list in a forum.

But I'll give it a shot...

"win xp home sp3 - acer aspire one - dell monitor 1680x1050 - vga "

Which Acer Aspire One netbook model ? It's on a label on the outside of the case - AOxxxxx

Which Dell monitor model ? It's probably on a label on the back of it.

"intel 945 from my netbook"

You must have
- the Intel mobile (laptop, netbook) 945 main chipset drivers installed - Acer may list them listed as Main Chipset or Chipset drivers or as the INF Update Utility (Intel's name). If you're not sure whether those have been installed it does not harm to try installing them again even if they have already been installed
- the Intel 945 integrated video drivers and associated software for your specific netbook model that you get from the Acer web site installed the RIGHT way. See the last part of this post.
Laptop video drivers are always specific to the model - the correct monitor drivers for the built in display are embedded in the video software installation.

"I installed the new drivers, but my res still doesnt show up!"

Depending on the method you used to install the Dell monitor drivers, Windows doesn't necessary set the external monitor display to actually use those drivers.

When Windows is actually using the monitor drivers for the specific monitor model, by default Windows only shows you the resolutions and settings that both that monitor model and the specific video drivers support.

""win xp home sp3 "

RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen, choose Properties, then the Settings tab.

Which of the two displays you click on determines which physical display you are setting the Resolution setting for.

Click on the display icon on the right - number 2 -

If both the specific monitor drivers for the model and the specific video drivers have been loaded and are being used, it will say there......

Dell xxxx Monitor or similar on Intel 945 graphics controller or similar.

(If you DO NOT see ....on Intel 945 graphics controller or similar, see the last part of this post).

If it says Plug and Play Monitor or Default Monitor on Intel 945 graphics controller or similar, Windows has NOT been set to USE the Dell monitor model drivers.

See response 9 here:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Scroll down to...
"When you get to the desktop screen , RIGHT click on blank part of the main Desktop....

In your case, if you have actually installed the Dell monitor drivers, you follow those directions and click on the checkmark in the box before Show compatible hardware or similar to remove the checkmark.
A list will then show up on the left - scroll down to Dell and chose your monitor model. Etc.,etc., etc. with the rest of the procedure.
..........................................................................

You MUST install the video software the RIGHT way !!

Sound and video "drivers" always have associated files that must be installed properly along with the actual drivers. If you install only the actual drivers, it's likely the device, and/or the other software associated with it, will NOT work properly.

Unless the instructions for installing a device tell you otherwise....
(this ALWAYS applies to video and sound adapters )

You DO NOT install drivers for a device while booting into Windows, if the software for the device has not been installed yet - when Windows detects a generic device or New Hardware while booting, you allow it to search for drivers, it doesn't find any, and it wants you to show it the location of the drivers - CANCEL that, continue on to the desktop, and install the software for the device using the proper installation from a CD or the proper installation file that you downloaded from the web.
The same applies no matter when Windows finds New Hardware !

If you DID install drivers that way,

(The following also applies if you want to un-install previous software, or re-install the same software)

- for video "drivers"....

- go to Control Panel - Classic View - Add/Remove Programs and Un-install the software you installed, reboot, DO NOT install drivers while booting, let the desktop screen fully load.

Install the video software properly by running the proper download you got from the web, or if you have the CD that came with the video card that's in a slot, or if you have the CD that came with the brand name computer that has the Drivers on it, run the video software installation from the installation program on that.


Report •


Ask Question