formatting recovery drive

Toshiba / Satellite a200
January 15, 2009 at 20:08:30
Specs: Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition, 1.596 GHz / 1014 MB
I've tried everything. I created a recovery drive but it wasn't created right, when i boot my system it gives me 2 choices c: which is my good drive and d: which comes up unidentified OS (recovery drive). i converted the D: from fat32 to ntfs no problem doing that. But I can't delete the partition or format it even after converting. Says its a system partition and windows won't allow formatting. Also can't actually see whats on the drive But when I tried formatting it says it has over 5000 files and uses 4GB. I do not want to format my C: drive please!!

See More: formatting recovery drive

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#1
January 15, 2009 at 20:33:32
You will need to format it from within a DOS environment...or bootable floppy or cd with the formating program installed. The ultimate boot cd has the neccessary tools for formating along with other utillities. Google for it ......UBCD

It will be an image file ISO in which case you download it and use nero or other burning uttilities to open and burn the ISO into a bootable CD with the files installed. Set your CD/DVD drive as first boot device and boot to the cd. Just make sure that you are working on the correct partition when they are located!

In reference to 11/05/2008


"So this is how liberty dies. With thunderous applause."
- George Lucas


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#2
January 15, 2009 at 20:44:11
Thanks for the fast reply...
I'm downloading that program now. So this will keep my very important C: drive in tack?

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#3
January 16, 2009 at 06:35:28
Why are you trying to wipe the restore partition? You need those files to restore your computer.

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Related Solutions

#4
January 16, 2009 at 06:51:47
Ditto what OTH said..

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#5
January 16, 2009 at 07:34:41
The recovery files don't work I must of did something wrong. Believe I did something wrong. I created a disk from this site with sp3.

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#6
January 16, 2009 at 08:32:01
Let's start at the beginning. So, you have your OS installed on C, and you have an NTFS D: as well. Do you just want to delete any data on drive D and then use it for data storage?

What does Disk Management show as far as D:, and how are you trying to format it?

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#7
January 16, 2009 at 10:04:45
Maybe the recovery partition isn't working because you converted it to NTFS. The older image recovery programs used by manufacturers (like Drive Image) were not able to access NTFS partitions.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are actually causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed, which gives access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#8
January 16, 2009 at 12:26:16
To Jenn's response: Yes I want to delete all the data on drive D: which is now Ntfs. But nothing will let me do it. It says the the system file is missing from drive D because it is the complete recovery drive. I think there is a virus on it. I really need to get rid of it all together if I can't format it.

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#9
January 16, 2009 at 12:28:14
To aegis response: Believe me I've tried everything before converting it to Ntsf. It wouldn't let me format it when it was fat32 either. It was a suggestion on here to convert it.

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#10
January 16, 2009 at 12:37:15
Jenn: first I just tried formatting it from the command prompt It just says windows won't allow this. Then I downloaded a program called USCD4WIN and tried formating it from that program but still won't allow. I still not sure what else this program does I created a image recovery disk from USCD but didn't try it yet.

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#11
January 16, 2009 at 13:11:04
Reference responses 3 and 4. You should not delete that recovery partition. You might need it some day.

There 'isn't' a virus on that d: partition.

If you need more disk space, using an external USB drive or replacing your hard drive with a larger one are 'much' better options.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#12
January 16, 2009 at 14:45:24
Aegis: i think it does have a virus because my virus did delete some files from there due to virus.. It is not the original recovery that came with my laptop. It is premade from a windows /xp SP3 program I downloaded from a Torrent.. I really have to get rid of it without damaging my c drive.

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#13
January 16, 2009 at 15:46:07
Oh, that changes things. I don't understand why anyone would do something like that, but anyway...

To get rid of that partition you can download DelPart and use it to remove the partition. Just be careful to remove the correct one!

You can find the DelPart download about 2/3 of the way down the following web page. I can assure you that it's not any kind of malware.

http://www.russelltexas.com/delpart...

You can then use the XP Disk Manager to create a new partition and format it.


For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#14
January 16, 2009 at 16:04:46
Aegis: Starters my laptop came with windows vista and changed that to WindowsXP which my original recovery no good. So when I did make a new recovery to disk the drivers wouldn't work. So that is how I came about creating this new recovery with the torrent i download but it had virus and deleted the system file. I can't even see what's on the drive. And I can't get a copy of the toshiba HDD recovery utility.
But i will try your suggestion and will keep you updated. Thanks!!

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#15
January 16, 2009 at 16:51:49
Ah so! Now I understand how you got into this situation, and it makes sense.
I am amazed that there are 'recovery partitions' available on Bittorrent. I'll have to look into that someday. :-)
But I think a better/safer way to get a recovery set up would be to use something like Ghost or Acronis.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#16
January 16, 2009 at 17:50:37
sweet

Just to be clear on what you are working with. Is the recovery partition the one for Vista? If so, I suggest you leave it alone. At some point you may want to go back to Vista.

Did you buy the computer new? If so, did you get any recovery disks with it? If not, did you make you own as your were supposed to?


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#17
January 16, 2009 at 18:08:39
yes i did make my own recovery disks but because i switch to windows xp from vista the recovery no longer works. The recovery on the D: is not from vista or windows XP original disks, its from a windows XP SP3 with vista capabilities torrent i downloaded, but it contained viruses, but it was too late and now I can't delete it; format; or see the files on it or even edit it.

BTW Aegis the Delpart program won't work it gives error trying to access hard disk but I press continue and then when completed it said no hard disk found.


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#18
January 16, 2009 at 18:24:15
I think you will have to put DelPart on a bootable floppy, and run it that way. Sorry, I thought it would run under windows (Pretty dumb, I know).

I hope you have a floppy drive, if not it will have to be put on a bootable CD

Don't delete the wrong partition! :-)

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#19
January 16, 2009 at 18:50:42
So then you have everything you need to restore Vista when and if you want to. Don't mess with the recovery partition. It isn't big enough to use as a working partition anyway.

I sure don't understand something. If you hate Vista so much why would you try to install "a windows XP SP3 with vista capabilities"?

If you really want to have WinXP then go buy a CD and install it. You should be able to simply boot to the CD and format from there.

If you do get your hard drive formatted now then what is going to be your next step?


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#20
January 16, 2009 at 19:14:13
Sweet believes there is a virus on the Recovery Partition. If there is, I assume it's not active, but I guess it will relieve her mind to see it gone.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#21
January 16, 2009 at 20:01:25
Vista is the worst OS i've used. Mainly because of the security issues...Too many!! But I did like some of the other options especially the gadgets and the different themes; and other little things. OK now Aegis: I did figure out how to run delpart from bootup.. But now i just don't understandwhich partition is the correct one to delete. There is 2 but it seems like they're backwards... Info as I see it with delpart running:
Drive 1 - partition MBR1 - Boot yes - Size 6958M - Type NTFS/HPFS (that's the first one listed)
Drive 1 - Partition MBR2 - Boot no - Size 41969M - Type Unknown (That's the 2nd one listed). I'm so confused!!!
I know my C drive is the biggest and it's my boot drive, it's like 104GB and the D drive I'm trying to delete is about 7GB

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#22
January 16, 2009 at 20:16:11
Some of the manufacturers 'do' put the recovery partition as the first partition on the drive. I've always thought that was pretty dumb, but i guess they have their reason.

The first one (6958mb) is the right size for a recovery partition and the one you should delete.

However, because it is the first partition (which is normally assigned the C: drive letter), it 'might' cause a problem if you try to partition and format it. WinXP does ignore what the bios wants a lot of the time, so it might not be a problem. I'm not sure, maybe someone else has an answer.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#23
January 16, 2009 at 20:29:38
Well I thank you Aegis. I think I will wait for other suggestions.. I definitely don't want to lose my OS on my C: I got it just the way I like it.

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#24
January 16, 2009 at 20:40:38
If you don't care about the 7gb. there won't be a problem deleting that partition.

I really doubt if there would be a problem repartitioning it. XP normally remembers the assigned drive letters. I'm just not absolutely positive.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#25
January 16, 2009 at 20:57:47
If you are sure you made the Vista recovery disks then you can delete the recovery partition.

I think the "Drive 1 - partition MBR1 - Boot yes - Size 6958M - Type NTFS/HPFS (that's the first one listed)" is your Windows partition. It is listed as an NTFS partition. The other is unknown. That would make sense because the restore partition is usually hidden.

You can use delpart to delete both if you want to.

I don't see where you have a partition with over 100GB though. Do you have a second hard drive?

You still didn't answer what you intend to do for an operating system.


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#26
January 16, 2009 at 21:19:27
Oh Jeez, I just noticed that the large partition is marked as not bootable. That means it probably needs that restore partition to boot. How that came about is a puzzle! And an unknown partition on the large drive, as Othehill pointed out?

I don't understand that. I think you better not delete it.

Othehill, she evidently has a working OS on the C: drive. I am really confused!

After thinking about it. It appears to me that an install was done and accidently(?) put on the 7gb restore partition.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#27
January 17, 2009 at 07:18:45
aegis1

Without going back through this entire thread I think it was you that mentioned the results of converting the restore partition to NTFS.

If that was done it may have then made that partition visible.

sweet

Do you currently have a working OS? If so, is it Vista on a 100GB partition?

What is your total hard drive capacity according to the manufacturer?


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#28
January 17, 2009 at 10:36:42
Yup, Othehill. I agree that 'Something' sure did make the partition visible and cause this mess. :-(

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#29
January 17, 2009 at 12:56:47
Well peeps I really thank you for all suggestions but now I really screwed it up. I wish I had of waited for the last few comments because I took the suggestion of Just putting the actually windows disk in and act as if was going to install it. This would allow me to delete the partition. Well that's the suggestion I followed and Guess what. For some strange reason that was the partition my OS was operating from. I'm still confused... It was the small partition and when I went into that partition on DOS it was called the C: and the D: was the large drive where all my files and programs were. Anyway I left the D as it was and reinstalled windows on the deleted partition becasue I did not want to lose my programs or files. Well now I have another problem. OS is now actually on the C drive and all my programs are on the D. Anyone know how to fix this. And If I reinstall windows on the D will I lose my files or programs. My drivers are also on the D. Or is there a way to associate the two drives to work together,

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#30
January 17, 2009 at 12:58:38
Right now I'm working off my second computer because I have to reinstall all the drivers that are on the D drive.

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#31
January 17, 2009 at 14:22:41
Well sweet, unfortunately you are in a serious bind. Somehow the OS on the large partition was corrupted. DelPart showed it as not bootable. That might have happened when you downloaded the Torrent 'restore' thing and installed it. It probably went to the large drive and not to the restore partition like you thought.

Evidently you were able to install XP on the 7gb restore partition. My suggestion (tough as it may be) would be to delete both partitions, repartition the drive the way you want it and then redo the XP install.

Of course, getting the drivers is another problem.

I guess you could 'try' a 'Repair Install' on the large partition, but my feelings are that, because it's not bootable, the repair will not work.

There was a person who managed to do a 'Repair Install' on a non bootable drive yesterday, but he never posted back with how he managed to do it. Maybe someone who does know the trick will pop in and pass that information on.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#32
January 17, 2009 at 14:43:48
Yeah I would like to know how that turned out.
Is there anyway of putting this message back to the top of the forum.

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#33
January 17, 2009 at 14:46:42
So If I try to reinstall OS onto the D drive will I lose my data... I don't think I can repair because It does recognize an OS on that drive.

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#34
January 17, 2009 at 15:28:25
Sorry Sweet, a normal install will wipe out all your files and data.

You could 'try' using a Knoppix Live CD to see if you can recover anything from that partition. Another option would be to physically remove the drive and hook it up to another system as a slave, or by using a USB adapter. You might be able to save some of your files. But I worry about the fact that DelPart said it had an unknown file system. That could mean that it's completely unreadable and needs to be repartitioned. :-(

There is no way that I know of, to move the post up. But because this is a different problem that you have now, you could start a new post with a new subject and reference this post #173480, or you could post a link to it.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#35
January 17, 2009 at 15:50:21
Oh Man, I screwed then!!!?
If it helps I can read everything in the D: drive. I can even run some programs still. What about moving them, like the windows folder from the D drive and overwrite the windows files on the c drive.
Oh and btw can i make c drive bigger by taken some gigabytes from the D

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#36
January 17, 2009 at 15:54:46
If the data is importand then use Knoppix. Get it at the link below. Get the first 696MB file from the bottom.

Knoppix is a live version of Linux that installs to and boots form one CDR. You will need some place to copy the files. Knoppix can configure all your hardware. You can copy to a second drive in your system, external drive, optical drive, network drive, etc.

http://www.kernel.org/pub/dist/knop...


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#37
January 19, 2009 at 07:28:50
sweet, I already answered that question in your other thread.

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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