Format A Linux Hard Drive

January 29, 2010 at 17:07:57
Specs: Windows XP
I was given a computer with Linux installed as the operating system. The hard drive is password protected so I can only get it to boot to the point of it asking for username and password. All I want to do is get rid of the Linux and install this hard drive into my good computer with a fresh load of Win XP. Your help is much appreciated - Thanks

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#1
January 29, 2010 at 17:20:54
If you have a XP CD;

Install the hard disk in the receiving machine.

Boot to the XP CD.

Remove any (unwanted) partitions on the disk.

Create a partition.

Format the new partition (NTFS preferred).

Install XP.

It's a good day when you learn something


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#2
January 29, 2010 at 17:29:06
Thanks for the reply - I put the drive in my computer and and booted with a win98 CD and just got stuck when trying to remove partions - does the Win XP CD operate different? I only have the Win98 at home with me , I left the XP at work.

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#3
January 29, 2010 at 17:38:16
"install this hard drive into my good computer with a fresh load of Win XP."

So, install it. Use XP's tools to re-partition it.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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Related Solutions

#4
January 29, 2010 at 17:39:22
Yes, the Windows 98 CD does work differently to windows XP, a lot different.

To do the same with Windows 98 CD you need to boot to a DOS prompt and use Fdisk to delete Linux partition. Create a new one and then format.

If you intend to install Windows XP on this hard disk I would wait till you have the Windows XP CD and do it properly. You will then be able to format it with NTFS which you cannot do with Windows 98.

Stuart


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#5
January 29, 2010 at 18:49:12
Just tried everything with Win98 cd and no luck - it would never actually see the C drive, just a virtual C ram drive which I could not run FDisk or Format from. Even tried a Compaq Recovery Tools CD I made from my XP computer and that looked like it was going to work then came up with an error message " Not for this type system" or something like that.

This hard drive has nothing on it except the Linux OS - I guess this will have to wait til next week unless you have another idea - Thanks


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#6
January 30, 2010 at 05:04:25
What's the equivalent of FDISK for Linux ? If that OS is still all right, I don't see reason why you could not start the partitioning tool of Linux, and try to reconfigure that one (although if all is on 1 drive with a working OS, this is what I refer to as the suicide-config ... no options at all when something goes wrong). Maybe next time think about a smart config ? Or you could take your floppy/USB/CD/DVD/BlurRay boot-disk ...

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#7
January 30, 2010 at 06:09:13
Hello,

this drive was password protected so I cannot get the drive to boot beyond where it asks for the password which I do not have. So I can not access any of the Linux utilities.


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#8
January 30, 2010 at 07:59:51
So, is this a laptop hard drive then?

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#9
January 30, 2010 at 15:01:16
No,

It is in an old Dell desktop -


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#10
January 30, 2010 at 15:20:31
So transfer the hard drive to your computer and run the disks from there.

What OS, if any, is currently on your computer?


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#11
January 30, 2010 at 15:50:01
There used to be a deal with a drive that had been partitioned a number of times in linux and then you tried to make a partition with fdisk. Some deal about the numbers get too high for MS I forget.

You can use a linux floppy with a partition app to fix that number deal. I don't think xp has the same problem.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#12
January 30, 2010 at 17:15:49
My real computer has XP on it. And I thought of putting the Linux drive into that box as a secondary drive and then running FDISK but I am cocerned that I or it might FDISK my XP drive and that would not be a good thing.

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#13
January 30, 2010 at 17:28:52
If the HDD is password protected & you do not know the password or able to get it from whomever setup the password, you are SOL.

Windows 7 News!


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#14
January 30, 2010 at 18:02:52
I think killdisk would wipe the drive. I don't know of any desktop drives that have a secure method of password protection. Of course that may not mean there isn't any.

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