External Hard drive 1T became RAW want NTFS

July 29, 2009 at 18:04:13
Specs: Windows XP
How can I reformat a 1T external hard drive from RAW to NTFS. It became RAW when using WD utility Lifeguard.

See More: External Hard drive 1T became RAW want NTFS

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#1
July 29, 2009 at 19:36:17
Raw for most things means it is not formatted. Use computer management snap in for storage. Under admin tools.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


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#2
July 30, 2009 at 17:17:51
I don't understand the term "snap in"; I understand what RAW means. I went to administrative tools; chose storage; but nothing happened after that.

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#3
July 30, 2009 at 17:56:26
Data Lifeguard Tools should be able to partition the hard drive. If you did that then the next step is to format it. You can do that in Disk Management.

You didn't go deep enough in manage. Go storage> disk management. Then highlight the drive in question and go Action> All tasks> Format. If the drive is not yet partitioned then follow the same steps and choose partition first then format.


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#4
July 30, 2009 at 18:41:18
Everything seemed to be going right --- until --- the error message (The format did not complete successfully) which I've gotten each time I've tried to format the drive. It may be time to return it and try something new. Eh?

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#5
July 30, 2009 at 19:23:07
WinXP & Vista are having issues with formatting such large partitions.

IMO you should create multiple smaller partitions using the Western Digital software. ITB is too large for one partition.

Probably nothing wrong with the drive, other than being too big.

Did you install the drive in the enclosure or did it come that way?


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#6
July 30, 2009 at 23:06:15
Since we last talked, I spoke with WD tech support; they think there is something wrong with the drive and they gave me an RMA to return and they'll send me a new one. I think it is more likely that you are right about the size of the drive being the REAL problem and that breaking it up into more partitions might have resolved everything. WD's drives are usually quite dependable. (It is not the kind that fits into an enclosure.) I put an HP 1T on my husband's old computer but it was NTFS to begin with. I also put a 1T Iomega on my Mac without a problem. Out of five drives mine are all WD (C, D, F, G, H); F is the problem; I don't understand why it didn't come NTFS!

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#7
July 31, 2009 at 06:39:09
Drives normally are not partitioned or formatted when new.

Believe it or not Windows isn't the only platform drives get used. Other OSes don't use NTFS.

Have a look at the link below.

http://partition.radified.com/


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#8
July 31, 2009 at 09:13:12
What a wonderful link. Explanations even I can follow. I've been a Windows user for so long now I haven't even consider other Oses. Considering I started my desktop computing with a KayPro I am surprised at myself for forgetting. I appreciate the link and, assuming WD comes through with a new drive, I'd like to be able to shout to you for a joint laugh when I find I cannot format the new one because my BIOS will only accept four drives, not five. I've already decided to remove one of the smaller externals and multi partition any new T size drive. Watch for my next moan and groan and whine. Luise

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#9
July 31, 2009 at 14:24:22
External drives are not counted in the mix. If your hardware is IDE ATA?ATAPI type you may have TWO controllers that can use a total of FOUR drives of hard or optical types.

One thing we didn't touch on is 48 bit LBA compatibility. What that is about is your BIOS being able to configure hard drives larger than 127GB. If you are using an external USB enclosure that limitation doesn't apply.

What capacity are all your current internal hard drives? Is your USB enclosure a fairly new model? Older ones were not 48 bit LBA compatible. One other thing to note. WinXP Original (no service packs on the CD) is NOT 48 bit LBA compatible either. So if that is the type of CD you have some extra steps are necessary.


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#10
July 31, 2009 at 18:33:03
Maybe its just the heat but my computer is acting badly so I'll make this short and quick. My two internal hard drives are about 140 mgs each (as I remember). The external drives are WD Book drives, not the kind with an enclosure. I had the BIOS updated about six months ago. With my computer behaving so squirrely I haven't been able to access very much today. Maybe when it cools off later in the evening. I don't work well when its hot either. My computer and I have a symbiotic relationship.

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#11
July 31, 2009 at 19:10:06
If the WD drives connect by USB then they are external and they have an enclosure.

Check your system temperatures. You can boot into the BIOS and look under PC Health or download a program to monitor while in Windows. Speedfan if one I have used.


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