Articles

Solved Ethernet and Network cables

June 21, 2007 at 00:50:02
Specs: XP SP2, Intel Pen4 1800Mhx 1GigRD

Hi all.

I have a blue Ethernet cable and a green Networking cable, both have the same fittings at each end.

What is the difference between these cable other than the colour?

Can the green Networking cable be used as an Ethernet cable to or from an Ethernet Switch?

Regards

Thinking hurts my head that's why I live in West Australia


See More: Ethernet and Network cables

Report •


#1
June 21, 2007 at 02:28:32
✔ Best Answer

Ethernet cables & Network cables are synonymous. There really is no difference at all in term of outer color and function. They all are one and the same based on the CAT5e/CAT6 specifications/standards.

The only important thing one need to be aware of are how the wires inside the cable are arranged. See link below

http://www.incentre.net/incentre/fr...

BTW the cable outer color actually comes in nine different color options. Not every suppliers carry them in stock - this one does.

i_XpUser


Report •

#2
June 21, 2007 at 03:29:13

Hi XPUser.

I checked out your suggested site, thank you.

I had another look at my green cable (the longest of the 2) and written on it is "patch cable to....etc." I can't access the blue one as it is at the moment in accessible.

So what I intend to do when my new Ethernet Switch arrives is to use the blue (existing Ethernet cable) and the green cable in the following manner.

Blue cable from the DSL modem to the Ethernet Switch and the green "Patch cable" from the switch to the computer.

Can you see any problems with this?

Regards

Thinking hurts my head that's why I live in West Australia


Report •

#3
June 21, 2007 at 03:48:12

"patch to ..." does not mean anything to me. Basically there are two types of ethernet cables: Crossover & Straight-through. Go by the following guideline.

1. The only way to distinguish when a cable is straight-through or crossover is by closely examining the wires color on the ethernet RJ-45 connectors using this illustration.

2. Connections that typically require a crossover cable:

a) computer to computer
b) computer to uplink port
c) computer to print server
d) uplink port to uplink port (hub/switch)
e) normal port to normal port (hub/switch)

3. Connections that typically require a straight-through cable:

a) computer to residential gateway/router
b) computer to normal port (hub/switch)
c) access point to normal port (hub/switch)
d) print server to normal port (hub/switch)
e) uplink port to normal port (hub/switch)

i_XpUser


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 21, 2007 at 04:00:57

patch is a straight through no crossover. xp user is spot on with the uses but.
depending on the switch depends on if you can be lazy or not. new network cards and switches can auto sence and make it so no matter what cable you put in it works doing this automatically. netgear is the daddy for this. there is also ones with diper switches to set this up. From what i know most comoputing is dumbing down so you can use any cable on most new non-cermerical use hardware and will auto sence.

all text needs typos. There there for the reader to find,to distract them from the total lack of content.
google it! wasnt the answer to the question i asked so dont be dense and give me that repl


Report •

#5
June 21, 2007 at 04:05:48

"Ethernet cables & Network cables are synonymous"

Well...

Some network cables are token ring. LOL

If yours have RJ-45 connectors on them, find somebody with a cable tester. They can tell you in a few seconds whether they are straight or crossover. And equally important, whether they are usab;e.

I kinds like the lemon-yellow ones.


=====================================
If at first you don't succeed, you're about average.

M2



Report •

#6
June 21, 2007 at 04:08:44

In any case it's time to clear up cable confusion again :-) Get coffee and read...

Straight Talk on Network Cables

i_XpUser


Report •

#7
June 21, 2007 at 04:34:39

Hi guys.

Great response from all, thank you.

I have taken all said on board and read the links provided.

Unfortunately I can not tell the colour coding of this green (5 metre) cable as it is a store bought one and the actual cable sheathing intrudes into the RJ-45 clip and under the clear plastic clip so all I see is green.

From what I can gather here, and have read from the links provided the main "good" point is that I can just plug it in and see what happens. I need not have trepidations of a big blue flash and the demise of my PC.

Thanks guys

Thinking hurts my head that's why I live in West Australia


Report •

#8
June 21, 2007 at 05:24:05

If I were a betting man I would bet both your cables are straight. I have read here that some hardware can autosense and adjust accordingly. I have no personal knowledge of this. Normally you need a crossover cable between the Modem and Router. There are also Crossover Connectors available. As the naem implies you can create a crossover cable by piggybacking TWO straight thru cables with the connector in the center. I don't think any harm can come or it if you inadvertently use the wrong one. Crossover cables are also used to link two computers using thier NICS. Once you find a crossover cable tag it so you know what it is.

Report •

#9
June 21, 2007 at 06:13:40

XPUser, pink isn't on that list. :) I use a pink cable.

Life is more painless for those who are brainless.


Report •

#10
June 21, 2007 at 06:19:02

LOL OK then there must be over 1100 color combinations somewhere :-)

i_XpUser


Report •

#11
June 21, 2007 at 07:10:59

I couldn't resist adding this comment. I think I will somehow find no color transparent ethernet cables so I could watch packets traveling back & forth LOL.

i_XpUser


Report •

#12
June 21, 2007 at 07:34:44

Watch out for them green electrons. They blow fuses.



=====================================
If at first you don't succeed, you're about average.

M2



Report •

#13
June 21, 2007 at 07:44:14

"So what I intend to do when my new Ethernet Switch arrives...

Presumably, it will come with a cable supplied, so... then you will have 3 cables! That cable is bound to be some kind of generic cream colour, and personally, I would not bother un-twisting the tie and "unfolding" the kinks out of it, and go for the Crayola ones!!


Report •

#14
June 22, 2007 at 00:55:14

I have a blue ethernet cable, a yellow ethernet cable, two grey ethernet cables, and an orange crossover cable. The blue cable came with my router. The yellow cable came with my dsl modem. All the cables work except the crossover cable because I have no free computer to computer ports. The yellow cable currently goes from the modem to the router. The blue cable connects my old puter to the router. And on of the grey cables connects my new puter to the router.

I am always plugging in the grey cable to the new puter directly into the modem, replacing the yellow cable. This is because when dsl loses its connection the router subsequently fails and I have to unplug the router for a half hour until it gets reset.

Compaq Presario SR1720NX Desktop Computer
AT&T SBC Yahoo DSL Home
Linksys Router/2 computers


Report •


Ask Question