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change password on Laptop bought from friend

October 25, 2010 at 04:12:38
Specs: Windows XP

just bought Toshiba A35 S159 laptop (old) from a friend but he can't remember his password. How can I reset it to a new password

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#1
October 25, 2010 at 04:51:46

Sure he can't remember it.

Ask your "friend" to give you your money back. Or to provide you with an original receipt for purchase so you can prove to Toshiba that the machine isn't stolen.

They are the only ones who can help with the password.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#2
October 25, 2010 at 06:40:34

Which password are you referring to? BIOS, hard drive, or Windows?

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#3
October 25, 2010 at 07:02:57

OtheHill, password issues are 99% stolen laptops

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Related Solutions

#4
October 25, 2010 at 07:14:16

XpUser4Real

I understand the issue. I am not sure of the percentages. As was discussed recently in a thread here at CN, there are some instances where the issue may be legitimate. If the OP is looking only for a Windows password then IMO help can be provided.

The logic here is that if there is no issue with BIOS/ hard drive passwords then the laptop can be used by the OP anyway by simply installing any OS.

We have no way of knowing if the laptop is stolen or not. In the absence of the above mentioned passwords I feel there is no harm in helping. If the password is for BIOS or hard drive then I concur that we should not help.

I would recommend they perform a factory restore. If they don't have restore disks and there is no restore partition I would advise them to use Linux or buy disks.


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#5
October 25, 2010 at 07:36:21

Ok, let's wait to hear which password is in question...but being a betting person, I would place my money on the bios password ;-) as that makes the laptop totally disabled.

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#6
October 25, 2010 at 07:37:48

this is a very old laptop and I only wanted it for the Internet. It appears to be BIOS! He didn't have anything except the laptop. I bought a power cord from Toshiba. Can a computer repair shop help as I'm tired of logging in as a guest. It has Office 2000 installed, that's how old it is.

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#7
October 25, 2010 at 07:41:26

bingo! I win!Sorry, no matter how old it is, it may have been sitting around cooling off forever before the person decided to sell it.

Unfortunately, even repair shops can't do anything with a bios password, it would be a waste of money to try.

You may as well keep logging in as a guest because even swapping out the HD will not remedy the situation. Other than that, you can use it for a small boat anchor ;-)

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions Cheers


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#8
October 25, 2010 at 07:52:00

If you can log in to Windows then the password you are after is a Windows log-in password.

Try continuously tapping F8 at start up. Once you get to a screen with options, choose to boot into Windows safe mode. You may need a administrator password at that point. Try to just hit the enter key. If you get into Windows safe mode you will be able to make the necessary changes.

That said, what is the problem with logging in a a guest?

I am using Windows 7 and still running Office 2000. If it still works then why upgrade?


If you are not successful booting into safe mode then when in standard mode go to manage> disk management. Post what listings you see there.


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#9
October 25, 2010 at 09:01:09

http://www.pogostick.net/~pnh/ntpas...

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#10
October 25, 2010 at 09:13:11

Hirens boot cd has BIOS removal tools

http://www.hiren.info/pages/bootcd

Wether they work or not, I can't say.

Hard disk passwords can't be removed.

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


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#11
October 25, 2010 at 10:08:12

BIOS password removal tools won't work on newer laptops either. They work on desktops but you can clear a desktop BIOS password by clearing the CMOS anyway.

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#12
October 25, 2010 at 10:10:52

sorry, this is getting pretty comical now...LOL

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#13
October 25, 2010 at 10:35:19

What is comical about it. Unless I misunderstood #6 it appears the OP can log into Windows. That means it is NOT a BIOS password. All mention of BIOS password removal techniques are irrelevant to this thread.

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#14
October 25, 2010 at 10:48:46

Ok, I must be missing something here and you are catching it, (maybe)...the poster is not answering back #1...ok, and the poster is not able to access administrator mode from what I can gather as he can only log in as a guest. He said it appears to be a 'BIOS' password problem
"It appears to be BIOS! "
That being said, what I said is probably right...but then again I have been wrong before...I'll admit that. That's why I find this getting more comical as the people are suggesting password cracks, etc...

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions Cheers


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#15
October 25, 2010 at 11:00:47

whoa! I think I'll do what someone has suggested and just keep signing on as "Guest". I have a great desktop and just wanted to use this as a travel computer.

I want to thank everyone for your quick responses.

Gary


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#16
October 25, 2010 at 11:01:57

You may be correct about there being a BIOS password. If the boot order was set right and there is no hard drive password then I guess they could get to Windows.

I am assuming this is not the case due to the wording of #6. Guess we need to hear from gary again for clarification. At any rate, a BIOS password would not stop a user from changing log in parameters. Might not even stop them from installing an OS from an optical drive. Depends on how the boot order is set.

As far as I know, none of the suggestions in this thread would help with a laptop BIOS password anyway. You are correct in saying we shouldn't be helping with that issue though.

Response #9 is just dealing with Windows passwords.


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#17
December 30, 2010 at 06:44:27

I can assure you that laptop isnt stolen...I couldnt even tell you which password it is...I can say that we can access everything on the computer under the previous owners name ,including the internet, we just cant change anything. I dont know enough about computers to argue which password I need, all I do know is that my daughter tried to change the date and time and it asked for a password....So if ANYONE knows how to help...PLEASE HELP!!..I just gave this thing to her for Christmas!!

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#18
December 30, 2010 at 07:03:24

I believe Toshiba has a restore partition on the hard drive. Look at the link below to see if they are of any help.

http://en.kioskea.net/faq/4811-tosh...

Or possibly try Alt + F10 at start up.

Watch the screens when the computer is first started to see if there are instructions on what keystroke/s to use for a factory restore.

Keep in mind that this will delete everything you have saved or installed since you have owned the laptop. So backup those items first.

After performing a factory restore you may need to download any missing service packs and/or updates. This process may also allow you to make a set of disks to perform the factory restore if the hard drive were to fail.

It appears that laptop came out in 2004. The restore procedure for Toshiba may have changed in 2007. So, there may or may not be a restore partition available.


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