Can't Repair Install Windows XP

Intel / E5200
January 15, 2009 at 14:14:52
Specs: No OS yet, Intel CoreDuo E5200
Hi, I changed my motherboard and CPU but not my HDD.
I wanted to keep my Windows XP and everything on the HDD, so I decided to do a Repair install for the sake of making my windows work with the new hardware.

I have done quite a few Repair installs in my life and I was surprised to find that this time (with the new MB and CPU on), the Windows installer does not offer me to Repair!

I get the Repair console offer, skip it, as always, and then, on the next prompt there is no "Repair" option at all.

Here is what I get (apparently there is no "Press R to repair").

http://img57.imageshack.us/img57/86...

I checked the HDD - it's perfectly OK.
It has one Active Primary partition with the Windows XP on it.

Why can't I get the Repair function then?


See More: Cant Repair Install Windows XP

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#1
January 15, 2009 at 14:53:37
I believe that you select 'Setup' and then in a later window you get the option for a complete install or a repair.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are actually starting the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#2
January 15, 2009 at 15:24:37
You press R for the Recovery Console, not the Repair Console. There is no Repair Console. Aegis is correct-you select 'Setup' and then in a later window you get the option for a repair install.

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#3
January 15, 2009 at 15:27:26
"Here is what I get (apparently there is no "Press R to repair")"

Why does it say "Partition1 (new volume)"?

You can't repair what's not there.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 15, 2009 at 15:29:06
^ @aegis1, nope.

Normally you would get what you described on the prompt after the ""Repair using the Recovery console"" prompt.
Then the "normal" Repair would be offered.

What you see in the screen shot is actually the prompt that should contain the "normal" Repair option.
But it doesn't.

If you still decide to go on and click on "Setup" (which I've done several times while trying to understand what is wrong), you will be asked to format your whole HDD.
If you choose "Don't format, leave the current file system", the next prompt will notify you that there is a folder, named "Windows" that must be deleted.

The installer pretty much does not see the existing Windows installation as such, but rather only sees the Windows folder and wants to remove it and to install a completely new one in its place.

Back to my question: why don't I get the "Press R to repair" option?


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#5
January 15, 2009 at 15:33:56
QUOTE:
Why does it say "Partition1 (new volume)"?

I don't know, mate. That's why I asked for help.

I have a perfectly working Windows XP on this HDD.
Actually, I am using that same HDD and that same Windows XP to post this.
Installed back to my older PC, of course.

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#6
January 15, 2009 at 16:03:33
What did you change from? Was the motherboard from/in an OEM computer (Dell, Gateway, etc)? In other words did your OS come pre-installed?

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#7
January 15, 2009 at 17:01:00
I'm with Othehill. It seems like you might be working with an OEM CD and not a Microsoft CD.

That screen you are getting is not normal if you are booting from a 'Microsoft XP install CD.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are actually starting the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#8
January 15, 2009 at 17:24:43
It is a Microsoft CD that I have been using for three years.
I have done hundreds of Repair installs using that same CD.

Seems that after I moved this HDD to the system with the new motherboard and CPU, the new system can't read my old HDD correctly or something.

I believe that the real problem is that Windows installer can not see the already installed Windows on this HDD. Therefore it doesn't ask me if I want to Repair - it just doesn't see anything there.

Tried fixing the MBR - didn't help.

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#9
January 15, 2009 at 17:57:37
Is this an IDE or SATA hard drive, and how does it show up in the BIOS ?

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#10
January 15, 2009 at 18:18:06
It is a SATA drive - a nice Hitachi, 305 Gigabytes.

Not sure what you mean with your second question, but it shows up OK in the BIOS.
Recognized by the system and everything.

Problem may be that this Hitachi drive was on my old PC together with another hard drive (a Samsung).
They both had Windows XP installed on them but I think they both booted from that other drive and maybe the boot.ini and the other files are not stored on the Hitachi, so now it can't boot by itself and does not get recognized by the Windows Installer.
This is all mere speculation, though.


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#11
January 15, 2009 at 18:45:31
Is the SATA mode set to IDE ? By the way, to do a repair install, you're supposed to hit enter at the screen you posted to setup Windows, not "R", which would give the Recovery Console. Then you select the XP installation you want to repair from the list and press R to start the repair.

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#12
January 15, 2009 at 19:00:36
"Problem may be that this Hitachi drive was on my old PC together with another hard drive (a Samsung).
They both had Windows XP installed on them but I think they both booted from that other drive and maybe the boot.ini and the other files are not stored on the Hitachi, so now it can't boot by itself and does not get recognized by the Windows Installer."

That would certainly explain why it's not being recognized as a disk with an operating system. It has to have a valid MBR, PBR and boot files.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are actually starting the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#13
January 15, 2009 at 19:03:36
Let me clarify my last post. At the screen you posted, select the XP installation you want to repair and press R to start the repair. It doiesn't tell you to select "R"-you just press "R" on the keyboard.

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#14
January 15, 2009 at 19:38:59
Try this:

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/X...


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#15
January 16, 2009 at 00:57:06
@kx5m2g, please read my previous posts.

I have done quite a few Repair installs in my life and I pretty much KNOW how to do a Repair install.

The screenshot you see in my first post is of a screen that appears AFTER I have hit Enter and chosen not to use the Recovery console.
This is the same screen that NORMALLY asks you if you want to hit 'R' for repair.
But in my case it does not offer you this option because the Windows installer doesn't see any OS on my HD.

And that's the real problem, actually.
_


@jam, tried this yesterday. The Recovery console can't copy files to my C. Or at least it reports so.
I will try copying them from another Windows.


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#16
January 16, 2009 at 07:10:26
What happens if you just let the system boot without intervention? I don't see where you tried that.

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#17
January 16, 2009 at 09:30:09
Vladimir88, you can't 'copy' the Master Boot Record or the Partition (Volume) Boot Record. They have to be set up by an OS Install.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are actually causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed, which gives access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#18
January 16, 2009 at 09:32:40
mmm - been there (or somewhere very similar) and got the tea-shirt, and the cream-cakes too...

Possibly this is the reason: IF... the sp in version of XP CD you are using is older than the sp installed on the system as was... you will NOT get the option to repair...; only a new install etc...

So either you create an XP cd with appropriate sp slipstreamed in...; or you're probably out of luck?


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#19
January 16, 2009 at 14:28:27
I managed to cheat the installer that I already have an XP installation on my HDD and thus get the "Repair" option.
Actually, it is not correct to say that I've "cheated" it because I *DO* have an XP installed indeed.

Now I'm using my good old OS with all its 150 Gigs of Program files.
Such a bloody relief!


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#20
January 16, 2009 at 15:01:01
Go into device manager and check the driver for the SATA drive. I think you MAY need to slipstream the AATA drivers into the WinXP CD in order to repair. If the BIOS is set to ACHI then you need the SATA drivers. I believe in order to perform a repair you need to have those drivers if they had been installed originally. Also response #18 MAY be necessary.

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#21
January 16, 2009 at 15:03:13
No one has asked this question. If your current installation is working why do you want to perform a repair anyway?

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#22
January 16, 2009 at 15:27:15
Clue us in, Vladimir88. How did you accomplish that. We can use that information to help someone else with a similar problem.

For what it's worth to XP users: When you click on the 'Command Prompt' you are just causing the 'Command prompt' to be displayed. This prompt gives you access to the 'NT Virtual DOS Manager'.


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#23
January 16, 2009 at 15:57:42
mmm... This seems to be another of those less than clear posts as to what the problem really is; and consequently we appear to have gone wandering about in the desert looking for clues and answers?

I read it as: "have (or had...) an installation but cannot repair it, as the XP setup routine fails to find it..."

The solution alluded to by Vladimir (but no details...) would seem to be another possible one to have around? So yes please "Vladimir" tell us all how you dun it?


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#24
January 31, 2009 at 16:21:03
I was thrilled when I saw this thread. Now that I'm at the end of it, I am discouraged. I used a defrag utility to do a boot-time defrag of the start up files. It BSOD just as I saw the defrag screen. Now I can't boot anything.

WinXP Pro SP3.

When booting with a Slipstream (SP3) CD, I do NOT get the repair as an option. So I was hoping I could find some way to repair the system files, or whatever has been trashed.

In the mean-time, I am installing onto a new hard drive and see if I can recover My Documents and other such important files.

Please don't ask why i backed up my son's computer and not my own. I already hit my head on the wall a few times from this failure.


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#25
January 31, 2009 at 20:45:48
Follow up on this problem: I copied the Hard Drive and used the new one to see what happened if I just ran the Install setup. (remember I didn't get the "repair" options) The install ran as usual, and during the reboots, I saw the other boot options listed. Once the setup finished I rebooted and choose the 'broken' XP installation.

To my surprise, it booted up. I'm not sure that it's at 100%. Windows wanted to install a new found device. Windows Update installed 2 updates and I don't know what they were. Norton Internet Security said something needed fixing, but it didn't. It was something about Mail In and Mail Out. Then I couldn't get the program to run again.

I shut it down now. That's when I saw the two updates being installed.

It's late and I', too tired to figure out what's happening and why. If anyone has a good clue as to what may have happened, please speak up and let me know your thoughts.

Thanks


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