Cannot find registry!

April 9, 2008 at 11:07:51
Specs: Win XP Home, AMD Athlon 3Gb
I need to amend some registry keys to correct an error which prevents me from installing Diskeeper. I select Start > Run and type “regedit” [OK]. I then get the message that Windows cannot find regedit. Can anyone please suggest a way that I can access regedit please. Otherwise my computer is running OK Thanks

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#1
April 9, 2008 at 11:18:09
Have you tried regedt32?

If the Registry won't open, and your receiving errors when attempting to install a program, you may have a virus. Have you scanned your drive with a virus program?

Life's more painless for the brainless.


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#2
April 9, 2008 at 11:41:40
I had your problem when working on someone else's computer.

Your PATH environmental variable is probably screwed up.
The PATH is a list of folders where Windows looks first when you type a name of a program file - if the file is in one of those folders, the program is found and it executes - if it isn't, you get a message it isn't found or similar.
Windows has it's own PATH and may be different from the PATH for cmd mode; cmd mode has it's own PATH and I know from experience sometimes the folders listed get deleted or otherwise screwed up.

Start - Run - type: cmd , click OK
type: path, press Enter.
It should say at a minimum
Path=C:\Windows;C:\Windows\System32

Your drive letter may be different if the Windows installation does not see itself as being on C.
It doesn't matter if they are not in that order - they can be anywhere in the PATH statement.

regedit is in C:\Windows
If C:\Windows is not on the PATH for cmd mode, Windows cmd mode will not find regedit, unless you change folders to the C:\Windows folder.
e.g.
Start - Run - type: cmd (Enter, or click OK)
type: cd\Windows (Enter)
type: regedit (Enter)
OR
at Start - Run, type: C:\Windows\regedit (Enter, or click OK)


If the PATH has at least those 2 folders listed, your problem is something else.


If it's screwed up, you can fix it.
RIGHT click on My Computer, choose the Advanced tab, and choose
the Environmemtal Variables button.

Find the line starting with Path in the bottom box, highlight it, and select the Edit button.
Edit the line in the Variable value box so that it starts
%SystemRoot%;%SystemRoot%\System32;

There are no spaces between entries.
Each entry is ended with a semicolon The last semicolon is optional.
% is the uppercase of 5.
If there are other folders listed, leave them as is.

Click on OK when finished editing, and OK.
You may need to reboot for changes to take effect.


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#3
April 9, 2008 at 12:54:46
Thanks Jennifer for the above. I don't think I have a virus as I always have Zone Alarm firewall and anti virus on.

Thanks Tubesandwires for your very comprehensive reply which is a bit difficult for me to fully comprehend. Anyway, if I take it step by step, here are details of what appears after I have followed your instruction " Start - Run - type: cmd , click OK
type: path, press Enter:
Path=C:\Windows\system32;
C:\Windows;C:\Windows|System32\Wbem;
C:\Program files\Zone labs\Zone Alarm\Mail Frontier etc etc it goes on in the same vein mentioning 3 more different programs.
I then tried your 2 instructions after "e.g."
above and got the replies
"Regedit is not recognised as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file"
and
"Cannot find C\Windows\regedit"
Do I now try the "If it's screwed up" solution or what please??!!



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Related Solutions

#4
April 9, 2008 at 13:23:03
Your path is okay.

"Do I now try the "If it's screwed up" solution or what please??!!"

No.

"I then tried your 2 instructions after "e.g."
above and got the replies
"Regedit is not recognised as an internal or external command, operable program or batch file"
and
"Cannot find C\Windows\regedit""

there must be a colon after C, as in
C:\Windows\regedit


It sounds like it's been deleted.
To make sure, in Windows Explorer or My Computer look in your C:\Windows directory for regedit.exe.
(if exe is not shown, RIGHT click on the file, choose Properties)

If it is there, it may be corrupted.
If it isn't there, or in any case, try this.

If your regular Windows XP CD has SP2 updates on it, insert it in a drive. If it does SP2 is printed on it.
If this a a brand name system with it's orginal software installation on it, in theory you don't need to insert a CD, but theorginal Windows must have SP2 updates included.

(The following will not work if the CD or the brand name software installation does/did not have SP2 updates included originally. In that case you need to get regedit.exe for XP from the web and copy it to C:\Windows, or you can find regedit.exe in the contents of \i386 on your Windows CD and copy it to C:\Windows.)


Start - Run - type: cmd (click OK)
Expand the black window.
type: sfc /scannow (press Enter)

That checks essential system files on the hard drive against ones on the CD (or in the brand name system installation in theory that should already be on the hard drive somewhere) and installs any it finds are missing or corrupted (there may be other files that are missing or corrupted as well).

Expanding the black Window allows more text to be displayed if you get error messages.
.....

You could also try ckecking C for errors.
Start - Run - type: cmd (click OK)
type: chkdsk /f c: (Enter)
Answer yes to any questions.
Reboot.
Let Chkdsk run.
It briefly displays a summary when finished - watch for it.
You may be able to freeze the display by pressing your Pause key; press any other key to continue.

If it finds bad sectors,
Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.


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#5
April 9, 2008 at 16:55:56
Also, try to repair Registry using Microsoft's Tweak-it tool.

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#6
April 9, 2008 at 18:13:14
Hard Disk Analysis/Setup Tools, Major Manufacturers

It's a good day when you learn something


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#7
April 9, 2008 at 21:17:44
Dan Penny
Good link - many in one place!

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#8
April 10, 2008 at 13:31:02
"I don't think I have a virus as I always have Zone Alarm firewall and anti virus on."

That doesn't mean you don't have a virus.

Are the virus definitions up-to-date? Do you run regular scans (either manual or scheduled)?

You may still have picked up a virus since your last scan. It never hurts to run a complete scan (after updating definitions), at the first sign of problems.

Please let us know if you found someone's advice to be helpful.


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#9
April 10, 2008 at 13:35:36
Thanks to everyone for the above advice. I have, at this stage, only gone through Tubesandwires suggestions thus
1)I think I put the colon after C but just in case I tried it again with the same results.
2)Can't find Regedit in Explorer or the Windows folder
3)I have an XP upgrade disc with SP2.Put it in the drive, can't find any mention of Regedit on the disc or in folder 1386. Ran sfc /scannow the blue scan bar moved across the window - no errors or anything else.
4)Tried to run chkdsk as instructed but got the message "Cannot open Volume for direct access Type of file is NFTS Windows has finished checking" (although chkdsk didn't actually run)
I have spent all evening on this and am worn out - I am only a relative novice! I have had enough. It seems to me that I may have to format Drive C and reinstall Win XP. However if I do that I might as well upgrade to Vista, I will have to one day soon.
I don't want to seem ungrateful because I am very grateful for all the advice but it might b e easier to take the computer to the computer shop for them to sort out. I will think about that one.


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#10
April 10, 2008 at 16:34:50
"Can't find Regedit in Explorer or the Windows folder"

Is your folder options/view set to show all files and not hide files of known extensions?

It's a good day when you learn something


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#11
April 10, 2008 at 20:47:51
"I have an XP upgrade disc with SP2.Put it in the drive, can't find any mention of Regedit on the disc or in folder 1386. "

"Is your folder options/view set to show all files and not hide files of known extensions?"

regedit.exe is the \i386 folder!

If you can't see regedit.exe there, go to Control Panel - Folder Options - View - click on the circle beside Show Hidden Files to make the green dot there,
click on the green checkmark beside Hide Extensions for known files types
to remove it,
and click on the green checkmark beside Hide Protected Operating System files to remove it.
Click OK.
You should then be able to see regedit.exe in \i386 on the CD - copy in to C:\Windows.
(you may need to reboot first, but don't think that's necessary)

"Ran sfc /scannow the blue scan bar moved across the window - no errors or anything else."

That's good. Did you try running regedit after that? - I would think that would have restored it. If not, copy it from the XP CD.

"4)Tried to run chkdsk as instructed but got the message "Cannot open Volume for direct access Type of file is NFTS"

That's normal.
You answer Yes to the question after that.
Reboot.
Let Chkdsk run.
It briefly displays a summary when finished - watch for it.
You may be able to freeze the display by pressing your Pause key; press any other key to continue.

If it finds bad sectors, see above.

......

"It seems to me that I may have to format Drive C and reinstall Win XP."

That's very shortsighted.
It takes less than an hour to run Setup from scratch, but that's only the first step.

Even if you didn't have much on the computer you don't want to lose, it takes many hours more, or even days, to load all the Microsoft Updates required, load your video drivers, and load all the programs you want to use again that are not built into Windows.



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#12
April 11, 2008 at 04:07:48
Thanks for the above advice
1) Sci-Guy I have updated my anti virus and run a comprehensive scan of all my Drives. No virus I am happy to say.
2) Dan Penny Done that but no joy
3) effient haven't tried this yet
4) Tubesandwires
a) folder option view set as you suggest.
b) folder i386 was there all the time but named I386 on my computer which I took to be 1386. Anyway with all the files etc "unhidden" none of the folders on the XP CD were called or contained regedit.
c) ran sfc /scannow again this morning, same results as yesterday. Then tried to run regedit, again no joy, same results as yesterday.
d) Tried chkdsk again, said yes & rebooted. Chkdsk didn't seem to do anything but returned the same message about not being able to open the volume & that it had finished checking.
e) you are quite right about " That's very shortsighted". I have quite a bit of stuff on my computer and I know that formatting etc will be a long drawn out pain. I will keep trying for the time being but I get the feeling that I have hit a brick wall at the moment. Strange how my computer appears to be working OK with no apparent operating problems. Any other suggestions will be gratefully received!




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#13
April 11, 2008 at 06:59:46
As stated; "regedit.exe is the \i386 folder.... copy it from the XP CD."

This is the quickest way to get that file back. It's not compressed so no extraction is necessary. Simply copy it to C:\Windows (if "C" is your O/S drive).

It's a good day when you learn something


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#14
April 11, 2008 at 07:17:35
" folder i386 was there all the time but named I386 on my computer which I took to be 1386. Anyway with all the files etc "unhidden" none of the folders on the XP CD were called or contained regedit. "

Yes, it's I386.
I typed i386 to make it more clear what it actually is.
The default fonts make it easy to confuse capital i ( I ), lower case L ( l ) and one ( 1 ), especially if you are using higher resolutions so the fonts are tiny, or if you are older like me or don't have perfect vision otherwise and have a hard time making out really small fonts.

I have no upgrade XP CDs to look at but I know of no reason regedit.exe would not be in \I386 on any XP CD.
It's on the original XP Pro full version retail, the original OEM XP Home (always full), OEM XP Home (always full) SP1, and OEM XP Home (always full) SP2.

You can't find it if you use My Computer to look at the CD - all that does is autorun the CD.

You have to use Windows Explorer
(Start - Programs - Accessories - Windows Explorer)
I always have a shortcut to that on my desktop.
There are some things My Computer is useless for - one of them is when you want to see the contents of a CD that autoruns when you click on it in My Computer, if it doesn't have a selection Browse CD or similar.

Open the I386 folder and scroll down to regedit.exe (yes, there are a lot of files to scroll down through),

or if you Search the CD, make sure it is set to searching the whole CD, not just the root folder, or not some other drive letter -
click on More Advanced Options and turn on Search Subfolders (there should be a green checkmark in the box) if it isn't on.
The vast majority of the time this setting should be on!

You don't need these for finding regedit.exe, but
Search system folders, and
Search hidden files and folders
should have a green checkmark too,

and in ANY case, the vast majority of the time Case sensitive should NOT have a checkmark beside it.
That requires whatever you search for be exactly as you typed it, the alphabetical characters uppercase or lower case or a combination of those.
e.g. if Case sensitive is switched on, typing regedit.exe will NOT find what is on the CD - REGEDIT.EXE.
......

Also, when you search the partition Windows itself has been installed on and has been booted from, that's usually C, there should be TWO copies of regedit.exe - one in C:\Windows, one in C:\Windows\system32\dllcache.

If there isn't one in C:\Windows\system32\dllcache copy it to there too.

If there IS one in C:\Windows\system32\dllcache, copy it to C:\Windows if it isn't in C:\Windows.


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#15
April 11, 2008 at 08:10:51
Even if you can't figure out what is wrong, you probably have the option of running a Repair Setup procedure (often called a Repair Install) - that attempts to Repair your existng Windows installation by running Setup again, and does not harm anything already on the Windows partition that you have installed after Setup was intitially run.
It takes a little less time to run than the original Setup did, less than an hour, and it should fix this problem for sure.
However, you may have some minor problems after you run it, such as you may be able to download Microsoft Updates but they won't install - that is easy fixed - and if the original upgrade CD did not have SP2 updates you will probably have to install them again.

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#16
April 11, 2008 at 08:51:58
"Tried chkdsk again, said yes & rebooted. Chkdsk didn't seem to do anything but returned the same message about not being able to open the volume & that it had finished checking."

"returned the same message about not being able to open the volume "

That is NOT normal.

What you typed in cmd mode should have been
chkdsk /f c: - there is a space between chkdsk and /f, and /f and c:
it must be c: , not just c

When you see
"Cannot open Volume for direct access Type of file is NFTS"

you must type Y , press Enter, when it asks the question after that

You then reboot, and chkdsk will run before the desktop loads.
DO NOT press any keys after the blue screen with the text that mentions chksdk appears.
....

If you STILL get a message while chkdsk is running in that situation that it can't open some volume, try using chkdsk /x c:
instead of chkdsk /f c: at the cmd prompt.

That is supposed to force volumes that won't open to open, and also do what /f does.
......

If you STILL get a message while chkdsk is running in that situation that it can't open some volume, try using chkdsk /x/r c: instead of chkdsk /f c: at the cmd prompt.

That takes MUCH LONGER to run the next time you reboot, but it is supposed to force volumes that won't open to open, it checks the entire C partition for bad sectors including the free space, moves any data found on bad sectors to good sectors, and otherwise does the same things /f does.
......

If that won't open the volume either, you have a major problem, and it could very well be the hard drive is failing.

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.


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#17
April 12, 2008 at 13:56:39
Tubesandwires Thanks I had a go at the above but somehow
got sidetracked and again inserted my XP upgrade disc. I
then had another look at the i1386 folder and, surprise
surprise, I found 4 regedits:
1) Regedit with a picture of what looks like blue building
blocks flying about above. This appears to be the Registry
Editor 5.1.2600.2180 143kb
2) CH File 38.7kb
3) H 2.45kb
4) regedit 32 EX File 1.29kb
All 4 are dated 4/8/04
It looks as though I have wasted everyones time by missing
these files - my apologies.
My only worry is that as far as I can see Regedit is not
followed by .exe in any of the 4 files.
Anyway, if one of these files has to copied elsewhere can
you please tell me which one and to where please. I
suspect that you may have already told me the answer
above but I am afraid my head is in such a whirl I
can't remember. Thanks once again for all your help.

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#18
April 12, 2008 at 18:17:47
"My only worry is that as far as I can see Regedit is not followed by .exe in any of the 4 files."

Do you have "Show hidden files" selected in your Explorer View, and "Hide files of known extensions" NOT selected?

It's a good day when you learn something


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#19
April 12, 2008 at 20:07:07
"Regedit with a picture of what looks like blue building
blocks flying about above."

That's regedit.exe
Copy in to C:\Windows

"My only worry is that as far as I can see Regedit is not followed by .exe in any of the 4 files."

(Dan Penny's)
"Do you have "Show hidden files" selected in your Explorer View, and "Hide files of known extensions" NOT selected?"

As in response 11...

"If you can't see regedit.exe there, go to Control Panel - Folder Options - View - click on the circle beside Show Hidden Files to make the green dot there,
click on the green checkmark beside Hide Extensions for known files types
to remove it,
and click on the green checkmark beside Hide Protected Operating System files to remove it.
Click OK.
You should then be able to see regedit.exe in \i386 on the CD - copy in to C:\Windows.
(you may need to reboot first, but don't think that's necessary)"

As in response 14...

"Also, when you search the partition Windows itself has been installed on and has been booted from, that's usually C, there should be TWO copies of regedit.exe - one in C:\Windows, one in C:\Windows\system32\dllcache.

If there isn't one in C:\Windows\system32\dllcache copy it to there too."



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#20
April 13, 2008 at 08:40:06
Tubesandwires
WONDERFUL!!!! I have followed your instructions and I now have regedit in C:\Windows & C:\Windows\system32\dllcache.
It also seems to work Ok. So I am very very grateful to you and all the other people who responded to my cry for help without which I would still be scratching my head!! Many thanks.

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#21
April 13, 2008 at 08:56:01
We're glad to hear you have solved your problem.

If this ever happens again...

If there IS one in C:\Windows\system32\dllcache, copy it to C:\Windows if it isn't in C:\Windows.


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#22
April 13, 2008 at 13:16:25
Tubesandwires

Thanks. All the best Noel


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