Can I uninstall 7 then install XP on netbook

November 7, 2011 at 17:46:37
Specs: Windows XP

Heres the thing, I got a PACKARD BELL DOT SE/W-410UK netbook for my B-day, but the windows 7 starter pack isn't very good. I don't want to upgrade to a better form of windows 7 because my school uses that system and I dislike it. What I would really like is to have windows XP on it to make it run like a normal but tiny pc because it would be awesome if I could use it like my normal pc, which uses XP and is what i'm used to.

I haven't put much onto my netbook, just a couple of pictures that I can take off easyly, and I understand how to uninstall an operating system. I have an external cd drive that I can use and I was wondering, If I were to uninstall windows 7, would it work if I tried to install XP using an ordinary installation disk?

Thanks!


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#1
November 7, 2011 at 17:54:07

Yes, you can "downgrade" to XP, but you need to first find out if there are XP drivers available for all your hardware on your machine. Otherwise you'd wind up with only a "semi-working" netbook. You'd also (legally) need to obtain another copy of XP.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#2
November 7, 2011 at 18:00:09

Wow, fast reply, thanks! :D

I figured that if the cd method would work I could purchase one online from amazon or software4students, so thats fine. Thanks for the advice, ill check out the specs later.

Thanks again!


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#3
November 7, 2011 at 22:42:21

If you have enough disk space you could also install xp in another partition and have a multiboot configuration.

I find your statement that xp is normal interesting. I find the variants of windows similar. I think you could also install a version of Linux and add it to the multiboot mix.


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Related Solutions

#4
November 8, 2011 at 04:58:03

I foresee several issues.

1st of all, XP is 10 years old so there may not be drivers for your new hardware.
2nd, your netbook has a SATA HDD & XP does NOT recognize SATA. You will have to jump thru some hoops to get it to install. How to get it to install has been discussed numerous times - do a search.
3rd, your netbook has no CD/DVD drive. The external should work but sometimes they are problematic.
4th, Win7 is the "now", XP is the past. You should be learning the now. You stated your school has already switched to Win7, you should do likewise. You're not doing yourself any favors by clinging to an outdated OS.

Also, Tiny XP is an "illegal" version of Windows & can NOT be discussed in these forums. You blew it by mentioning it.


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#5
November 8, 2011 at 09:11:55

:O im sorry, i didn't know about that. I just meant I wanted normal xp to work on a netbook, which in my head is a tiny computer, so thats where I got that from. I didn't even know that that existed. I would never use an illigal version like that and I apologise.

The reason I don't want windows 7 is because something about it bugs me, and all I really want to use my netbook for is surfing the web and playing some old games. The main pc I use which i'm typing this from uses xp and I would just like the netbook to work the same.


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#6
November 8, 2011 at 16:01:16

As mentioned before, if you can find all hardware drivers, and your netbook will boot to USB, there shouldn't be that much problem installing XP. I've installed it on my older Asus EeePC 701 using nLite and it works fine with only about a 600MB install. You might want to look over these pages before proceeding (especially the last one if you want to significantly reduce the installation size):

http://en.kioskea.net/faq/3065-inst...

http://liliputing.com/2008/04/insta...

http://www.i64x.com/eeexp.php

While I had an external USB DVD drive to install from, it probably would have also worked to use a flash-drive (USB key) as mentioned in the above links.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#7
November 8, 2011 at 19:33:13

When the files initially loaded from the XP CD cannot find SATA drives, the EASIEST way to fix that is to change a setting in the bios. (The same thing applies to loading files from the \i386 folder any other way.)

Installing XP and SATA drive controllers, SATA drives; the SATA drive controller bios settings.
See response 2:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

I stated in that....

"The detailed info about how you set the SATA controller mode or similar - it varies
depending on the bios version - is probably in the manual for your mboard model, in the descriptions of settings in the bios.
If you need help with that, you must provide us with the make and model of your mboard."

That's assuming you have a generic desktop system with a retail mboard model in it.

If you have a brand name system, similar applies, but we usually cannot find what you see in a brand name system bios version regarding that to refer you to on the web.

Whatever the setting is, when the files initially loaded from the XP CD cannot find SATA drives, it's presently set to SATA or AHCI in the bios, it's changable, and at least one other choice is an IDE compatible mode of some sort.
.....

You probably have one big obstacle.

Usually you CANNOT install XP from an XP CD in a USB optical drive because the contents of the CD will NOT recognize the USB optical drive model !
In that case, the CD is recognized as bootable but when it tries to load all you see is a blue screen and nothing further happens !

( For that matter I don't know if the XP CD will recognize ANY USB optical drive model. In theory, you could make yourself a "slipstreamed" CD that has the ability to recognize the Plug-n-Play ID of the USB optical drive you're using integrated into the contents of the Windows CD, but I've never seen or heard of a procedure to do that. If you do that, you might as well integrate the SATA controller drivers for your mboard and the SP3 Windows updates into the CD if it doesn't have those while you're at it .
E.g. you can do at least the latter two things with the freeware nLite program.

The XP CDs also cannot recognize a USB floppy drive model unless it's an OLD model in a short list of models that were available when XP was first released, circa 2001 - 2002. There IS a procedure to make a "slipstreamed " CD that has the Plug-n-Play ID of the model you're using integrated into the contents of the Windows CD. If you do that, you might as well integrate the SATA controller drivers for your mboard and the SP3 Windows updates into the CD if it doesn't have those while you're at it .
E.g. you can do all those things with the freeware nLite program. )


.....

If you find that you CAN get XP drivers for all the devices on your computer's mboard and for any other devices inside the case connected to it .....

You CAN install XP by following a procedure

- to install it from a USB flash drive - search the web for info about that -

- to install it by removing your hard drive, connecting it to another computer, delete all data on the hard drive, make one small e.g. 2 gb FAT32 partition on the drive, install an older operating system on it, e.g. ME or 98SE or 98 or Dos 7.x (legal and free on the web), you copy the \i386 folder from a suitable XP CD to that partition, then you remove the hard drive, install it on your computer, the older operating system will (probably) boot on the computer, then you use a command to start the network install version of Setup from the \i386 folder on the drive partition and install XP on the remainder of the drive space. When XP has been installed, you copy the \i386 folder from the small partition to an XP partition so you don't need to supply the XP CD to install things not in the default installation.

However, - the older operating system must be able to recognize the hardware on your computer (at least the main chipset) and be able to install at least generic drivers for it. That may not work with a recent computer.
- if the hard drive is SATA, you MUST set the SATA controller mode in the bios to an IDE compatible mode when you want to load the older operating system (unless you can find SATA controller drivers for the main chipset that work in the older operating system and provide those drivers on a floppy disk in a conventional (built in) floppy drive).
..........

wizard-fred said

" If you have enough disk space you could also install xp in another partition and have a multiboot configuration."

You could do that but

- you're supposed to install the older operating system on the drive first in order for the built in Windows multi-boot ability of Windows 7 to work properly.
When you install XP second, by default you will have access only to XP.
However, there are workarounds you can look up for that that will make it use the Windows 7 built in multiboot capability.

.........

It has one glitch you may be concerned about.

If you use the built in ability of Windows 7 to multi-boot operating systems, when you load XP, it will DELETE ALL of the System Restore restore points in Windows 7, EVERY TIME you load XP !.
You can fix that problem if your version of Windows 7 (or Vista) has the bitlocker feature built in, but your version of Windows 7 (and my version of Vista) DOES NOT have that built in.

The same thing applies to multibooting XP and Vista.

I got around that with my XP MCE 2005 / Vista Home Premium dual boot system by installing the paid BootIt! N.G. third party multi-boot program, then configuring it so the Vista partition Windows itself is installed on is hidden from XP when you boot XP (there's now a video tutorial about how to do that on the BootIt! N.G maker's web site).


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