Boot from a logical drive

March 14, 2012 at 14:52:35
Specs: Windows XP
Okay, my computer, XP, has been running poorly and I replaced it, but there is software that I can no longer get that I need to run on my old PC and it won't run on Win7. My new PC is Windows 7, I partitioned the disk drive and I made an image backup of my old computers drive and put it on the new partition. My idea is to be able to dual boot the system into either XP or 7 based off of these two partitions. However, I can not mark the partition with XP on it as active, how can I make it bootable where I would go into the boot menu and select which partition I want to start from?

The partition with 7 is labled as "Healthy(Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition)" and the partition with XP is labled as "Healthy(Logical Drive)" There is also a partition called "SYSTEM RESERVED" that is labled as "Healthy(System, Active, Primary Partition)" and an unnamed partition labled as "Healthy(OEM Partition)"


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#1
March 14, 2012 at 15:21:26
Dual boot requires the older Operating System be installed first.
In this case XP. Then install Win 7.

The following relates to XP as being the newest O.S. ----
http://support.microsoft.com/defaul...
HOW TO: Create a Multiple-Boot System in Windows XP

Watch for help from others.


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#2
March 14, 2012 at 15:34:00
And there is no way your image of the old XP operating system will boot in the new hardware environment anyway even if you resolve the problems of configuring the dualboot menu and getting your logical drive marked as active.

If you have all your install media for XP and the software you wish to run then your best bet might be to consider running XP in a virtual machine within Win7.

This would require you to install XP and the software.

I gather however that you may not have installation media for whatever the software is. If that is the case then you are stuck using the old computer to run that software. Do you still have that system? If so we may be able to help with it's "running poorly" situation.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#3
March 14, 2012 at 16:05:58
what if i where to use a program like bootit bm? Would that allow me to boot from the XP partition, or is there absolutely no way to boot XP on the new hardware?

Im actually doing all of this for my mom and her old computer has gotten so bad that it takes about 20 minutes to launch firefox, I refuse to get on it and this was the best solution I could think of.


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Related Solutions

#4
March 14, 2012 at 16:17:44
Only one partition on one hard drive on a system can be flagged Active, at any one time.

When you set up a properly working dual or multiboot configuration, whatever operating system partition you choose when you first boot is flagged as Active by the multiboot program

I DO NOT recommend that you use the Windows operating system's built in multiboot feature to dual or multiboot XP and Vista or Windows 7 in this case !

You are supposed to install the older Windows operating system first, but you CAN get the Windows 7 multiboot feature to work when it was installed first when there is a working XP installation on another partition if you follow certain procedures.

However, by default, whenever you boot XP, ALL the System Restore restore points are DELETED in Vista and/or Windows 7, every time you boot XP !

If that concerns you (you may eventually NEED to try using a previous System Restore restore point, rather than installing Windows 7 from scratch) ......

If you have one of the more expensive versions of Vista or Windows 7 - e,g. Ultimate, that has the bit locker (bitlocker ?) feature, you can use that feature to get around that problem.

If you DO NOT have a more expensive Vista or Windows 7 version that has the bit locker (bitlocker ?) feature, then you're much better off using a third party multi-boot program that is Vista and Windows 7 "aware" (compatible) to multiboot your operating systems, instead of Windows 7's built in multiboot feature.

E,g. I use BootIt N.G. to dual boot (XP) MCE 2005 and Vista, and there is a video tutorial on the maker's web site about how you HIDE the partition Vista's or Windows 7's Windows itself was installed on while booting XP. It's not free but it's reasonably priced. .
.........

In your situation, if it's only the one program, or only a few programs, you want to run in XP, you're better off installing Microsoft's Virtual PC 2007 (virtual machine) in Windows 7, then installing an installation of XP in that Virtual PC 2007, then installing the programs you want to use in that.
(No problems with XP deleting the System Restore restore points in Windows 7 when it's booted.).

Of course, you must have a full version XP CD to do that.

Update

"there is software that I can no longer get that I need to run "

If you mean by that , that you cannot install that program from scratch....

Well that throws a monkey wrench at the idea of using Virtual PC 2007 in Windows 7, installing XP , then installing the program you want to use.
.....

" There is also a partition called "SYSTEM RESERVED" that is labled as "Healthy(System, Active, Primary Partition)" and an unnamed partition labled as "Healthy(OEM Partition)"

If this is a brand name system computer that still has it's original brand name supplied software installation, DO NOT mess with those partitions if you want to be able to run a Recovery procedure to restore the original software contents of the other large Windows 7 partition.

Vista and Windows 7 has the built in ability to SHRINK existing partitions without losing the data on them to provide un-allocated space to make a new partition on, or to EXPAND an existing prtition without losing the data on it if there is un-allocated drive space adjacent to it on the same physical drive, but I DO NOT recommend you do that just to run one or a few programs in XP.

The HELP documentation about how to use the built ability of Vista to expand - EXTEND - or contract - SHRINK - an existing partition without losing the data on the partition.

The same probably applies to Windows 7.

It's NOT in Help and Support (at least it isn't in Vista) - it's in Disk Management's Help.

In Vista....
Control Panel - Classic View - Administrative Tools - Computer Management - Disk Management

In Windows 7......
Control Panel - display as Large icons or Small icons - Administrative Tools - Computer Management - Disk Management

RIGHT click on the drive letter of the existing partition, click on Help.

Choose

Manage Basic Volumes

Extend a Basic Volume

or

Shrink a Basic Volume


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#5
March 14, 2012 at 22:58:45
Okay, right now I'm trying my luck with BootIt BM, which is the updated version of BootIt NG, we'll see how it works shortly. But, one other thing I have tried is taking the old computers hard drive and putting it in an enclosure and just booting straight from it. So far I've had the most success that way. It was able to get to the Windows XP splash screen but it would crash before actually launching the OS. Is their any reason why that would be happening/does that sound like anything that's remotely possible to do?

And thanks for everyone's help so far, I'm sort of lost when it comes to setting up dual boot systems.


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#6
March 14, 2012 at 23:07:33
The drivers will be completely different, and even if you get XP Booting does the new hardware even have XP support.

The best option is to install XP in a virtual machine.....

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#7
March 15, 2012 at 08:37:06
Jolicloud

"The best option is to install XP in a virtual machine....."

I agree, but Note what I said in response 4

"Update

"there is software that I can no longer get that I need to run "

If you mean by that , that you cannot install that program from scratch....

Well that throws a monkey wrench at the idea of using Virtual PC 2007 in Windows 7, installing XP , then installing the program you want to use. "
.....

BootIt info

Lopts of support for it:
http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/su...
.....

Go here:
http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/ho...

See this video

Prevent Losing Vista Restore Points when Multi-Booting with Windows XP (video)

The same probably applies to multi-booting XP and Windows 7
.....

"But, one other thing I have tried is taking the old computers hard drive and putting it in an enclosure and just booting straight from it. So far I've had the most success that way. It was able to get to the Windows XP splash screen but it would crash before actually launching the OS. Is their any reason why that would be happening"

When a third party multi-boot prgram is NOT being used, Microsoft does NOT allow loading an existing regular Windows 2000 or higher Windows installation from removable media, including an external hard drive or a flash drive or a memory card - all you get is a blue screen error - nothing further happens. .
(There are probably oddball or modified Windows versions that can be loaded from removable media. There is probably also a way of tricking Windows into detecting removable media as an internal hard drive.)

If you use a third party mutltiboot prrgram to load XP from the external drive, that may work (if that's what you've done I'm surprised that it does) , or if you use a third party multiboot program (or Windows' built in multi-boot feature) to load an existing XP installation from a partition on an external hard drive
when the Windows installation was installed on a computer that had a different mboard, then you try to use that same Windows installation with a differemt motherboard, if the present mboard's hardware (main chipset, primarily) is more than a little different XP WILL NOT load all the way normally.
Typically you see the first bit of XP's Windows graphics, then various things will happen
- .a black screen with a blinking cursor top left, nothing further happens
- or the computer restarts for no apprent reason, Windows shows the first bit of graphics, the computer restarts for no apprent reason, etc., in an endless loop
- or other symptoms.

You can't fix that situation without losing your personal data on that Windows XP installtaion unless you boot the computer from a full version XP CD and run the Repair installation of Windows procedure, often incorrectly called a Repair install, on the partition it was installed on..


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#8
March 15, 2012 at 10:28:19
I set up BootIt BM and it recognizes the XP partition as a bootable drive, it's just that when I try to boot from it I get an error saying "System32/ntoskrnl.exe is missing or corrupt." so it sounds like it'll work if I can find my XP disc and boot into the recovery mode to fix it.

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#9
March 15, 2012 at 10:48:05
See Response 10 in this regarding the details and requirements of trying a Repair installation of XP
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

Scroll down to:

"- If that doesn't help, you can try running a Repair installation of Windows"
......

If the hard drive is SATA, the initial files loaded from the XP CD the CD may NOT find it !
See this....
Installing XP and SATA drive controllers, SATA drives; the SATA drive controller bios settings.

See response 2:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
......

You MAY NOT be able to run that procedure on an existing XP installation that's on a partition on an external hard drive, but you CAN run it on an existing Windows installation on a partition on an internal hard drive.

NOTE that you NEED to make the emergency boot disk - a floppy or a CD - for BootIt, if you haven't already done so.

After you have used the XP CD to boot the computer and run the Repair installation of Windows, you will (probably) need to re-set BootIt to boot the computer from the proper partition BootIt wants to boot from, because running the Repair installation procedure (or booting the computer from the XP CD for whatever reason) sets XP's partition as the Active partition.


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