adm. pswrd to use recovery console

Dell / Inspiron 9200
January 8, 2009 at 17:56:06
Specs: Windows XP, Centrino, 1GB
Hi, this is my second post on the same issue. To recap, my comp was afflicted by viruses, which Norton Internet Security 2008 could not catch. I used MalwareBytes to remove 72 infected files and had to reboot. After the reboot, I was no longer able to login as I was logged off everytime (with the following text showing "logging off, saving your last settings") when I clicked on the user icon or any other icon including the Administrator.

I tried booting in Safe Mode, Last Known Good Configuration and also using the other options available, but still could not login.

I did not have a Windows XP boot disk and had to creat one from another pc. Now I am trying to use the boot disk to get to the Recovery Console. However, before getting to the Recovery Console I am being prompted to enter the Administrators password, which I do not know or recallect setting. I would appreciate very much your help in getting around this issue.


See More: adm. pswrd to use recovery console

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#1
January 8, 2009 at 18:17:36
Petri link

Silence is golden but duct tape is silver


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#2
January 8, 2009 at 18:55:44
"my comp was afflicted by viruses, which Norton Internet Security 2008 could not catch"

That's because Norton sucks.

"However, before getting to the Recovery Console I am being prompted to enter the Administrators password"

Did you try leaving the password hitting the ENTER key?

Why not just do a repair installation?


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#3
January 8, 2009 at 18:58:14
It's a bit late for you now but here's just one of things which should be done when your pc is running normally. It's a bug which MS has never fixed. In affected installations the Recovery Console setup will not accept any password even known passwords are rejected. I don't have a solution for your problem.

Extracted from Eldergeek.

"On many XP installations you can't start the Recovery Console because it won't recognize your password. This registry edit causes the Recovery Console not to ask for a password. This works for both XP Home and XP Professional.

Start | Run | Regedit
Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\WindowsNT\CurrentVersion\Setup\RecoveryConsole
Set the DWORD SecurityLevel value to 1
Exit Registry and Reboot"

Good luck.



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Related Solutions

#4
January 8, 2009 at 20:45:49
"However, before getting to the Recovery Console I am being prompted to enter the Administrators password...."

If you mean you booted with the Windows CD, and pressed R the first time you were given the choice to Repair Windows, that black screen interface IS the Recovery Console - you were already in it! However, you may, or may not, have to enter a password before you can actually use the Recovery Console, for security reasons.

You get that prompt for the password whether you actually have a password or not.

This is something I found out only by trial and error:

- if there are no asterisks ("stars"; *s; the uppercase of 8 on your keyboard) on the right beside ....password:, there is no password - just press Enter to continue.

- if there ARE asterisks, the password is the same one you use for Administrator in Windows, then press Enter to continue. Case is important (whether the characters are upper or lower case).


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#5
January 8, 2009 at 21:15:00
If you have access to another computer with a CD burner...
Get the ERD Commander CD here...

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...

Microsoft calls it the Microsoft Diagnostic
and Recovery Toolset...but it's really ERD Commander...

Burn a CD...then boot the computer from that CD...

As you explore the menues, there is a menu, I forget exactly what it's called...that will allow you to change passwords...

You can delete the administrator password, and your own account password...

Then try rebooting into Windows again...see if that helps...
Good luck


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#6
January 9, 2009 at 02:35:34
Thanks, for your suggestions. It turns out I dont need a password. Great now I am in the Recovery Console and the at the Windows prompt (C:\WINDOWS>). However, I am not sure what files (and the commands to use) to repair in order to be able to login into Windows again.

Please help..

Also, would this process delete my personal files in the hardrive? I am under the impression that by using Recovery Console my data will remain intact. Please let me know if that is not the case?


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#7
January 9, 2009 at 05:21:45
wahine, how exactly would one change that Registry value if booting into Windows fails?

Demagedon:

type in cd.. and hit enter

That will take you to the C:\

then type chkdsk /f and hit enter

After that's done, reboot and see if you can get into Windows.

Then, set an Administrator password.

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#8
January 9, 2009 at 19:27:34
"It turns out I dont need a password"

I thought so.
The first time I saw that ...password: line I didn't know what was going on either.
There is no info about the asterisks in the Recovery Console info on the Microsoft web site, that I could find.

Type: help (press Enter) to see the list of commands available in the Recovery Console.

Type: (name of command) /? (e.g. chkdsk,space,/?) (press Enter) to see a short description of how to use the command.

Type: exit (press Enter)
to leave the Recovery Console - the computer will reboot.

Don't boot from the CD when prompted while booting the next time you boot, and see if your computer will boot normally.
......

Your Windows may be too messed up for any command you use in the Recovery Console to do you any good.

If your Windows registry is intact in certain important places, there MAY be a second Repair option available - if there is, it's more likely to get Windows working okay again.

Many call the second repair choice a Repair Install procedure, but I think it more appropriate to call it a Repair Setup procedure, because what it actually does is run Setup again without deleting the contents of the partition Windows is on (which is usually C) first.

An XP Repair Setup will (almost always) not harm your existing Windows installation, but it can only fix things Windows detects as wrong, and/or replace corrupted or missing Windows files that are on your original XP CD. In the case of drastically changed hardware, it will set Windows to the new hardware situation.

You will need a Windows CD of the same version as the one of your Windows installation, and the Product Key, preferably the one that was used to install Windows on your computer (on brand name computers the Product Key is usually on the official Microsoft label on the outside of the case somwewhere), but it can be one for the same version as the one of your Windows installation.

How to do an XP Repair Setup, step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...

If your Windows CD does not have SP1 or SP2 updates included, and you updated to SP2, you may have to install SP2 again to get it working properly. SP1 or later is required for USB 2.0 and hard drives larger than 137gb (manufacturer's size; 128gb in Windows and most bioses).
....

Slipstreamed CD
If your XP CD does not have at least SP1 updates included, and you have hard drives larger than 128gb (in Windows; = 137gb manufacturer's size), and/or USB 2.0 support on the mboard, you need to burn a slipstreamed CD that has the contents of both the original Windows CD and the SP1 or SP2 updates
- e.g.

Slipstreamed Windows XP CD Using SP2
http://www.theeldergeek.com/slipstr...

Directions for using Roxio or Nero.
....

If you have the second Repair choice and run the Repair Setup and that gets your Windows working, you will need to re-register some Windows Update related files (otherwise, you will be able to download Windows Updates, but NONE of them will install) and you may need to re-install some Windows Updates.


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#9
January 10, 2009 at 18:25:44
Tubesandwires,

Thanks very much for your suggestions. I will let you know of the result as soon as I implement them. Much appreciated.


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#10
January 12, 2009 at 15:10:28
Hi, Jennifer Sumn and Tubeswire,

I have run some of your suggestions in the Recovery Console(e.g. chkdsk /p and /r), and, while some issues were found and repaired, I still have the same problem (I am getting logged off as I click on my user icon to login).

If I use the first option in the Recovery Console "to set up windows XP" (or as Tubesandwires expressed "Repair Install procedure") would I lose my data on the harddrive?


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#11
January 13, 2009 at 07:39:05
"If I use the first option in the Recovery Console "to set up windows XP" (or as Tubesandwires expressed "Repair Install procedure")...."

The choice isn't in the Recovery Console.
When you boot using the Windows CD and after the initial files are loaded from it, when you see the first screen that asks if you want to Repair Windows, you DO NOT press R to go to the Recovery Console - you choose to continue on to Setup. The second Repair choice you see later, IF it's available - it may not be.
If you DO NOT see the second Repair choice, "Repair your existing Windows installation" or similar, if you want to retrieve whatever you can, QUIT Setup at that point!!

"....would I lose my data on the harddrive? "

NO, for the most part. As I said
"...what it actually does is run Setup again without deleting the contents of the partition Windows is on (which is usually C) first."

See the
"How to do an XP Repair Setup, step by step:"
link above to see how to do the procedure.
It's for XP Pro - but if you have XP Home it's very similar.

If you have XP MCE (Media Center Edition 2002, 2004, or 2005), Setup looks very much like that for XP Pro, BUT you need to boot using the orginal, or a copy of the, first of the TWO OEM MCE CDs, you need BOTH original CDs, or copies of BOTH CDs, and the Setup procedure is slightly different and has bugs you need to know about - if you have XP MCE on the computer let me know BEFORE you try the Repair Install (Repair Setup) procedure!


You can always try running it to the point where you see whether you have the choice "Repair your existing Windows installation" or similar, or not, and quit Setup if you want to chicken out at that point, without harming any data.
You will either see the choice, or you won't if there is too much damage to the existing registry, or possibly if the Windows CD you use is one without any SP updates.

Some Windows related things are deleted then rebuilt, but for the most part, all the data and personal settings you added after you got the computer will still be on the partition Windows is on (usually that's C) and will still be there.
It runs very much like a regular Setup, except you are asked fewer questions, and have to set fewer things. You have to supply the Product Key - use the one on the official Microsoft label on the outside of the case.
Windows is usually already Activated when Setup is finished.

A few precautions.

Make sure you have the Product Key - it's on the official Microsoft label on the case. If you quit Setup without providing the Product Key, you won't have the "Repair your existing Windows installation" or similar choice when you try booting with the Windows CD again after that.

During running the Repair Install (Repair Setup) procedure, you MUST have NO errors reading files from the Windows CD - if you DO have errors, and quit Setup because of them, the procedure will have trashed your existing registry, and you won't have the "Repair your existing Windows installation" or similar choice when you try booting with the Windows CD again after that.
(your files will still be on the hard drive if you quit Setup when you have problems reading the CD, and you can take steps to retrieve some of the stuff you don't want to lose, but if the second Repair choice isn't there, as far as restoring Windiows itself, you have no choice except to......
- run the Recovery procedure for your Dell model to restore the original data that was on C when you got the computer [which requires you have made a Recovery CD for that purpose, that uses the contents of the intact existing second partition that is there on the orginal brand name system drive]
- run the Recovery procedure for your Dell model to restore the original data that was on C when you got the computer, using a Recovery CD set [which requires you have made a Recovery CD set for that purpose, or you have bought one from Dell for your model, if available]
- or - use a Windows CD or a bootable copy of a Windows CD of the same version along with the Product Key found on the official Microsoft label on the case, to restore just Windows, then you will have to get and load additional drivers for your model, etc., etc.)

- whatever optical drive you have the Windows CD in and it's data connection to the computer MUST be working properly
- the ram must be working properly - don't fiddle with it if it was working fine just before this
- it is a very good idea to make sure the Windows CD is clean, and to use a laser lens cleaning CD in the drive to make sure it's clean, BEFORE you run the procedure.



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