accounts management -Process having file copy errors/failure

September 25, 2012 at 08:44:44
Specs: Windows XP, 3GB RAM
What is the difference between system rights/permissions and user rights/permissions in Windows XP?

I have a "*****server.exe" file whose process runs normally under the user "SYSTEM" (as indicated in the Task Manager). It's responsible (I think) to copy/write files from another PC (either win7 or XP) to the server PC (must be XP), but the process fails unless I run the *****server.exe in debug mode. In debug mode this process runs under current user; ex: user = "Tim Jones" as indicated in the Task Manager. In this mode (command window) the file copy/write process does not fail.

So my question is why would this process fail when it's running under system account, but succeed under the current user account?

The input/output folders are given all the sharing permissions I can possibly think of... unless I missed something- which is possible.

I really need some help. I've been trying to get this process running for two straight weeks, and the manufacturer of the product "doesn't do networking". I'm due for a meltdown, and sending a blistering review to the president of the manufacturer.

Thanks for the help!


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#1
September 25, 2012 at 10:12:50
The server PC is not XP. You may be using it as a file server but there is no server software running on it. The system account might not have permissions to write to the target PC while the user does.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
September 25, 2012 at 11:35:40
I think I was unclear. You are correct, the XP PC is NOT a server. It is running *****server.exe as a sort of virtual "server" which looks for files off of shared folders on the network. When it gets the correct signal from other PCs, it copies the file onto the "server" PC.This transer isn't working because the SYSTEM account is different from the current user's account..I'm trying to determine what is different about it.

Thanks for the help!


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#3
September 25, 2012 at 13:17:26
http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/1288...

That explains some of it.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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